Filming yourself while playing

wildbill

Platinum Member
I've got an old Zoom Q2HD fine for me-.....
I have one of those too, but think it turned out to be a scam.
Some kind of scuffle between MS and apple, and nothing plays back .mov files now.
Possibly a case of simple planned obsolescence.
Was going to start a thread about what are people using now, but am unlikely to waste any more money on it.
So as long as this thread was going already, I decided to derail it - sorry 'bout that. Carry on.
 

Auspicious

Well-known member
I find that if I count as I am playing and try to play more on the beat then the lag disappears.
Ok I will try that next time.. I am not counting too much while playing.

Yup. It's a great way to take the wind out of your sails, reset, and practice. If you want to know where you NEED to improve listen to a recording of your self. The timing, touch, feel won't lie like your ears do when you are in the moment.

Video is great too as you can SEE what you are doing wrong. If you want to really make it bad try playing with no click, no backing tracks. JUST you. now listen to a pro play.
I dit it for the first time today.. just for the matter of testing the microphone of the camera, and honnestly I liked some things.. good suggestion. Playing the music in my head, playing "A Cappella"

Yep. This is why lots of pros smile while playing.
In my videos from today, there was an improvement in my appearance. But I think I'll be good with my faces of pain and struggle, I noticed that as a positive thing, it's awesome hahaha.

I recommend that all of my students record themselves playing both audio and video if possible, it's a humbling experience for sure! I still record myself playing just to keep my confidence as low as possible!
hahaha :p My confidence is already rock bottom, only good things can happen to me.

Amen. Recording myself was the single most effective training tool to stopping bad habits of my drumming.
Allright!
 

Auspicious

Well-known member
I spent a good amount of time tonight, placing the camera at the right distance of the drums to prevent, i don't know, clipping? and I learned to use basic fonctions in Kdenlive, the video editor open source for Linux.

I successfully recorded my drumming and I was able to incorporate the original sound track in a different time line track. The music is high quality but the drum is low fidelity from the webcam. Somewhat it works ok with the music, I mean, for the learning process.

The video is a bit too poor for me to publish right now.. but I know how to do it quickly now.
 

Rob Hirons

Well-known member
It's just a type of "what's on your mind" comment.

--> I thought I was better then that.

As I don't have a professor in my quest of learning drum.. and since I have the the obligation of using Teams at the job.. I bought myself a 40$ Chinese webcam. It's pretty bad at recording the drums but somewhat it's not that bad either.

It's good enough to tell me that I don't play in time almost all the time 🥶

I was never of fan of filming myself but the camera is not lying, only the harsh reality. I think it's going to help me over time.

End of thought.

(Recommended for DIY people)
It took me a long time to get used to seeing / hearing myself playing. But once you get over the initial unease, it becomes really really helpful.
 

Auspicious

Well-known member
ALSO, recording yourself may make you realize you play a specific lick way too often, to the point that it becomes cliche.

I've had guitarists who constantly quote the same guitar lick in their solos. I don't think they'd be using it as much if they listened to themselves more, no matter how good the lick is haha.

I am definitely guilty of this though, and recording my playing has made me more aware of it.
I noticed that, it's true.
 

johnjssmith

Junior Member
I have one of those too, but think it turned out to be a scam.
Some kind of scuffle between MS and apple, and nothing plays back .mov files now.
Possibly a case of simple planned obsolescence.
Mostly anything can play .mov video, it's been QuickTime's native format since its inception in the '90s and it can be viewed in the usual "aftermarket" video players, such as mpv (mpv.net on windows), mpc-hc and vlc, all of witch can be downloaded easily and for free.
Good luck with getting back to recording yourself :p
 
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iCe

Senior Member
I have a Zoom Q2HD too and it's a great cheap device. Yes it records video in .mov, but those can be converted with other tools/programs to whatever you want. These days i use it mostly for audio recording at rehearsals to listen back later what we played, how it fits or doesn't fit in a song etc.
It have some problems picking up low end, but for it's price i'm not complaining!

Once everywhile i video myself playing to see and hear how i'm playing. Is my technique ok, am i not overstretching to reach anything etc.
A great tool and also can be very confronting when you start using it. Years back i thought i nailed parts just to hear back later how sloppy it was etc. Great tool for reflecting on what needs attention.
 

Auspicious

Well-known member
If it goes well with my webcam, maybe I'll invest in a Zoom later, to get a better microphone. I've seen how good they are already in DIY videos.

Yesterday i did another video but I understand what the problem is, there is no "UNDO" button in drumming. I occasionnaly share some sketches, drawing on astronomy forums but with the sketches, I can correct them easily until I feel OK to publish them.

But with drums, if the take is bad, it's bad :p I need to record another one, can't really correct some parts of it with Audacity like I use Gimp for the sketches. :)

It's just new for me and the fact that I need to start recording again and again. 3 days newbie heheh
 

wildbill

Platinum Member
Mostly anything can play .mov video, it's been QuickTime's native format since its inception in the '90s and it can be viewed in the usual "aftermarket" video players, such as mpv (mpv.net on windows), mpc-hc and vlc, all of witch can be downloaded easily and for free.
Good luck with getting back to recording yourself :p

"....
Buy this domain
The domain mpv.net may be for sale by its owner!
...."

Just one example.
Don't mean to derail the thread, but rather than waste bandwidth talking about it, I'd rather know what camera people are using to record and play back on a pc without major hassles.
 

johnjssmith

Junior Member
Here you go - https://mpv-net.github.io/mpv.net-web-site/
mpv.net is the application's name, they have a page on github, you click "Download", then under the "Assets" tab you choose the version that you want, either to-be-installed or installed or portable/installer-less, uncompressed or compressed, and zip-compressed or 7z-compressed (to be opened with 7zip).

Also I don't think it's a derailment at all, it seems pretty on topic to me, and to answer you other question, I use my phone to record myself when I'm lazy, attached to a "phone holder", which is in turn attached to a ball head, or an EOS 6D and EOS 5Dmk3 when I want to record good quality video, to make drum videos for youtube for example.
Both those Canon cameras record MOV video by the way, and I have no issue playing it back on any device using the software I mentioned above and more.
 

cbphoto

Gold Member
I'd rather know what camera people are using to record and play back on a pc without major hassles.
Canon 70D with a 24mm pancake lens. Manual settings: 1/30 sec, f5,6, ISO 640. Camera video compression mode: ALL-I. Picture style: one from here.

Eight tracks of audio is recorded into my DAW (Studio One), is mixed and output to 48kHz/24bit wav file. This wav file is imported into Adobe Premiere as part of the project.

Footage is edited in Adobe Premiere and output from Adobe Encoder in the desired codec (eg., YouTube 1080p, Adobe makes easy).


 

SomeBadDrummer

Well-known member
ALSO, recording yourself may make you realize you play a specific lick way too often, to the point that it becomes cliche.

I am definitely guilty of this though, and recording my playing has made me more aware of it.
Me too! Going back to the 1980's when a drummer friend mentioned to me that I was using a certain fill too often. My one studio recording session proved the point. Understanding there is a problem is the first step to correcting it, so I'd rather know about it and fix it, than remain unaware and continue repeating worn out fills. I've more recently begun to expand my musical listening (spotify is awesome) to help me to continue to expand my repertoire. I love playing rock but also enjoy jazz and funk/fusion, which different styles I think helps diversify my playing.
 

cbphoto

Gold Member
Me too! Going back to the 1980's when a drummer friend mentioned to me that I was using a certain fill too often. My one studio recording session proved the point. Understanding there is a problem is the first step to correcting it, so I'd rather know about it and fix it, than remain unaware and continue repeating worn out fills. I've more recently begun to expand my musical listening (spotify is awesome) to help me to continue to expand my repertoire. I love playing rock but also enjoy jazz and funk/fusion, which different styles I think helps diversify my playing.
Variety indeed! I often ask my 20-something spawn for new music and they gladly provide. Some techno, some live instruments. Always with a vocalist (something I don’t always wanna hear).
 

Otto

Platinum Member
Don't feel alone...I have had my ego torn apart as well by recording.

note that some equipment may not be recording accurately and throwing in timing inconsistencies.

I like to record a click with my playing...then synch the click in 'real life' to the recording when listening back to verify my recording tech is not drifting in some form...lost a lot of ego while learning that issue.
 

cbphoto

Gold Member
I like to record a click with my playing...then synch the click in 'real life' to the recording when listening back to verify my recording tech is not drifting in some form...lost a lot of ego while learning that issue.
Drum Fun (now extinct) released a series called Test of Time. It’s a compilation of tunes that drop out for several measures throughout each tune. It’s a great way to calibrate to a tempo without a click.
 

SomeBadDrummer

Well-known member
Drum Fun (now extinct) released a series called Test of Time. It’s a compilation of tunes that drop out for several measures throughout each tune. It’s a great way to calibrate to a tempo without a click.
Where would one find an extinct compilation of Drum Fun?
 

wildbill

Platinum Member
Here you go - https://mpv-net.github.io/mpv.net-web-site/
mpv.net is the application's name, they have a page on github, you click "Download", then under the "Assets" tab you choose the version that you want, either to-be-installed or installed or portable/installer-less, uncompressed or compressed, and zip-compressed or 7z-compressed (to be opened with 7zip).

Also I don't think it's a derailment at all, it seems pretty on topic to me, and to answer you other question, I use my phone to record myself when I'm lazy, attached to a "phone holder", which is in turn attached to a ball head, or an EOS 6D and EOS 5Dmk3 when I want to record good quality video, to make drum videos for youtube for example.
Both those Canon cameras record MOV video by the way, and I have no issue playing it back on any device using the software I mentioned above and more.
I've been using something called VLC Media Player for the .mov files. I downloaded for free.

Thanks. I'll give them a try. I guess I gave up on it a few years ago.
 
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