Fellow Teachers - Student Not Hitting Hard Enough?

groovemaster_flex

Silver Member
I have a few students who, no matter how many times I show them... Or how many times I tell them, just won't hit the drums. We've gone over various techniques, I've jammed with them, I've told them to visualize things, watch other drummers, watch me, blahblahblah, but they still hit the drums like... Well, wimps.

How can I encourage my students to play the drums for articulately?
 

chaymus

Senior Member
I play very lightly most of the time, it's not necessarily bad but is definitely limiting. Try emphasizing full down strokes and a lot of accents and rebounds warmups.

I played this way from the beginning because I was in an apartment at the time, so all of my practice was driven with the idea to be quite. It was hard to open it up on command even knowing I was allowed and encouraged to do so. If this is the case push pad work for accents and heavier stuff.
 

DrumEatDrum

Platinum Member
Get a guitar and an amp. Learn to play a song on it.

Then make them play along to your guitar playing. When they realize they can't hear themselves, most likely instinct will tell them to hit with a bit more force.
 
By the way - You can try to use "drums" as an anger management therapy.

Ask them (few students), what are those things they "hate" in life. For every mention, they must HIT real hard the snare or floor tom.

...I bet those two shy little sheeps will roar as lions and tread on like elephants! ;*)
 
Last edited:

Fuo

Platinum Member
Damn teachers are never happy!

Youre hitting too hard, lighten up!
Stop being a pussy, hit those things!

Your grip sucks, we need to fix it!
Stop worrying about your grip, youre overthinking it.

Let the stick bounce!
Stop relying on bounce, use your wrists!

You seem to have a natural moeller motion wih your right hand, stop and use wrists!
Stop using wrists and do moeller motions!
 

brentcn

Platinum Member
There's really not much you can do to persuade a student to change their approach. Not all students love drumming, some are just keeping their parents happy by showing up for lessons, and being involved in something. The only thing you can do is find out why the student won't hit hard. Some are just shy, some have sensitive eardrums, some aren't allowed to hit hard while practicing at home, and some just don't give a *&%# (like most teenagers). On rare occasion, a student just likes softer music, and there's nothing you can do past showing them how to play a rimshot, and explaining that certain genres of music demand a certain approach, or else you'll lose the gig.

The students who love drumming enough will find a way to sound good in a band, and they will learn by watching others and listening to themselves in recordings. If he or she doesn't sound good, it's not a reflection on you as a teacher, so don't take it personally. The student owns the progress, not the teacher. The best you can do is inspire them!

To Fuo - *&$^%& students! Is it so hard to understand that a good player has not one, but MANY techniques, and can play quiet, loud, and everywhere in between? WTF?!
 

Fuo

Platinum Member
There's really not much you can do to persuade a student to change their approach. Not all students love drumming, some are just keeping their parents happy by showing up for lessons, and being involved in something. The only thing you can do is find out why the student won't hit hard. Some are just shy, some have sensitive eardrums, some aren't allowed to hit hard while practicing at home, and some just don't give a *&%# (like most teenagers). On rare occasion, a student just likes softer music, and there's nothing you can do past showing them how to play a rimshot, and explaining that certain genres of music demand a certain approach, or else you'll lose the gig.

The students who love drumming enough will find a way to sound good in a band, and they will learn by watching others and listening to themselves in recordings. If he or she doesn't sound good, it's not a reflection on you as a teacher, so don't take it personally. The student owns the progress, not the teacher. The best you can
To Fuo - *&$^%& students! Is it so hard to understand that a good player has not one, but MANY techniques, and can play quiet, loud, and everywhere in between? WTF?!
Ooops. My post was a joke. Forgot the :) at the end to make that more obvious.
 

groovemaster_flex

Silver Member
I do play guitar with them! We're doing Cut The Curtains by Billy Talent, which is a pretty balls-to-the-wall rock song. I think they lack the confidence to play harder, but even so. I'll try what you guys are saying!
 

BassDriver

Silver Member
Technique?

Confidence?

Enthusiasm?

Have these students played with any other musicians?

Have these students played with any other musicians who use amplified instruments?

...those are the kind of questions I would ponder.

I remember a drum teacher who bugged me into playing loud. He eventually made me do rimshots on habit (which is quite useful for simple backbeat playing). My first lesson with him was funny - showing me how to hit a strong backbeat on the snare, insisting that every strike should be freakin loud.

I think it comes with experience playing with other musicians that you learn about dynamics and tempo and a whole lot of small lessons that you cannot learn very well from a drum lesson.
 

groovemaster_flex

Silver Member
True enough! I try to jam with my students as much as possible; playing guitar with my student while he/she drums is a regular part of the lesson. I find that a lot of the younger students are very timid or (on the flip side) way too loud.

We also trade 2s, 4s, and 8s frequently, and I try and have the students match my volume. It's worked in some cases, other times it just frustrates the students, so I try and gauge with which students that method works with.

I encourage all of my students to form or join bands as well, as I found that playing in a band increased my desire to learn and my overall musicality exponentially. Nothing better than playing with real people, although jamming to CDs and iPods can be fun, too!

I also have a recording interface set up, and once a month I'll record my students playing in a lesson to show them how they improve. That way, the students can also hear how dynamically they play.

Anyways! It's just some students... I don't know what it is. Maybe it's just the personality type, in which case, is this an issue that I'd even be able to remedy? I'm still relatively new to teaching, so I'm still learning! I just try and remember how I learned how to play and apply that to them :)
 

Ms.Beatie

Junior Member
True enough! I try to jam with my students as much as possible; playing guitar with my student while he/she drums is a regular part of the lesson. I find that a lot of the younger students are very timid or (on the flip side) way too loud.
:)

Wow. Your classroom sounds awesome! How do you go about finding teacher jobs like the one that you have? I have been looking into changing some things in my life and this definitely sounds like a great career that you have going for you. Hope to hear from you soon!!!

Lyndsay
 

bobdadruma

Platinum Member
I have a few students who, no matter how many times I show them... Or how many times I tell them, just won't hit the drums. We've gone over various techniques, I've jammed with them, I've told them to visualize things, watch other drummers, watch me, blahblahblah, but they still hit the drums like... Well, wimps.

How can I encourage my students to play the drums for articulately?
Just teach them how to play Jazz and the problem will solve itself! :)
 

Dr_Watso

Platinum Member
Damn teachers are never happy!

Youre hitting too hard, lighten up!
Stop being a pussy, hit those things!

Your grip sucks, we need to fix it!
Stop worrying about your grip, youre overthinking it.

Let the stick bounce!
Stop relying on bounce, use your wrists!

You seem to have a natural moeller motion wih your right hand, stop and use wrists!
Stop using wrists and do moeller motions!
LOL. That's good stuff.

How about this classic from the band:

"You're not listening to us enough, we need more accents and fills"...
"Can you stop listening and comping us so much? Just lay it down already!"
 

Too Many Songs

Senior Member
I have a few students who, no matter how many times I show them... Or how many times I tell them, just won't hit the drums. We've gone over various techniques, I've jammed with them, I've told them to visualize things, watch other drummers, watch me, blahblahblah, but they still hit the drums like... Well, wimps.

How can I encourage my students to play the drums for articulately?
I'm not a teacher (though I've had plenty of lessons from very good ones) but the answer to this seems obvious to me. Stop telling them to 'watch' and tell them to 'listen'.
 

drum loops

Junior Member
Just have them practice on their own. I think the more they practice the more confident they will be and will play louder and get into the song. Also, make sure that they appreciate the song and are familiar with it.
 
W

wy yung

Guest
I recomend using Gary Chaffee's "Pattern" series of books to teach all dynamic levels. Try Rhythm and meter
patterns.


Aside from that, I let student "go crazy" and just bash when they are shy. This helps loosen them up.
 
Last edited:
Top