Fast playing and relaxation don't work and play well together within me

GetAgrippa

Diamond Member
I didn't use ear buds, because I was a sweat ball, but I use to run along to songs in my head. It would set my pace and often when I'd a hit a running wall the music would drive me through it to go longer distances or pick up my pace. It's crazy how it can give you a psychological and physical boost.
 

JimmyM

Gold Member
What part of your hand is actually tensing up? Are you squeezing your thumb and opposing finger too tight? Is your wrist working overtime because your fingers aren't pulling their weight? Maybe your technique needs looking at. You can get past this roadblock if you consider it thoroughly.

I really like Bill Bachmans teaching, check him out if you haven't. Don't be afraid to throw some money at the issue, a lesson or an instructional video will pay itself off in no time.
I would like to think I don’t grip too tightly or not use my fingers. I’ll allow for the possibility, though, and see what happens when I can do some playing.
 

Xstr8edgtnrdrmrX

Diamond Member
I didn't use ear buds, because I was a sweat ball, but I use to run along to songs in my head. It would set my pace and often when I'd a hit a running wall the music would drive me through it to go longer distances or pick up my pace. It's crazy how it can give you a psychological and physical boost.

i do the same on my bike. I set my pedal cadence to whatever song is in my head.
 

Xstr8edgtnrdrmrX

Diamond Member
for going up hill, it is usually "Battery" or "Damage Inc" by Metallica....or some other fast, aggressive song
 

GretschedHive

Silver Member
I don't walk in time to the music (at least I don't think I do). I just walk and play.
Yeah, I don't mean to walk in time. But I have trouble keeping myself from falling into the rhythm, or subconsciously trying to, and it's rarely the right speed.
Here's I secure the pad:

AH! That makes sense. What a great idea! My wife sometimes puts a board across the handholds on either side and puts her laptop on the board so she can type as she walks--even at a really low speed, she found herself walking well over 5 miles without even noticing. I wonder if it'd be the right height for a pad, and if the pad would stay or would bounce too much...
 

Xstr8edgtnrdrmrX

Diamond Member
I wish I could hook up a pad to the handlebars of my bikes! That would be great combination, but I can't ride "no hands" anymore, and there would be no way to do that on dirt and rocks
 

C. Dave Run

Silver Member
I wish I could hook up a pad to the handlebars of my bikes! That would be great combination, but I can't ride "no hands" anymore, and there would be no way to do that on dirt and rocks
You could get one of those wheel stands that makes the bike stationary.
 

Xstr8edgtnrdrmrX

Diamond Member
You could get one of those wheel stands that makes the bike stationary.

nah...if the bike ain't rolling through the woods/outside it ain't biking!!

I do bring my Mienl knee pad and sticks on long bike trips though, and play on my knee while resting sometimes
 

Drum108

New Member
The 5-3-1 method is excellent for gradually building speed and endurance while not forcing speed all at once.
5-3-1 is a method that takes any rudiment or or note value like eights or sixteenths for example and using a metronome, play at a tempo that is comfortable (relaxed and using correct sticking) for 5 minutes, then play the same exercise again at a tempo a few beats faster for 3 minutes, then a few beats faster still for one minute. Do this until you have reached the speed you want. you should now be able to play that exercise at your desired tempo without stress or tension. Note: allow only 10 to 15 seconds between tempo changes.
This does take time so be patient. Speed comes with practice and playing. Hope this helps.
 

eric_B

Senior Member
I've posted this pic and video before, but here's how I had to build speed. While I walk, I'll put on my headphones and practice rudiments along with the tempos of songs. If I get bored, I'll change a rudiment during the choruses or something like that. I try to change it up between songs. So for example, I may just do a single-stroke roll through an entire song. The next song I may do paradiddles during the verses then do flam-taps during the chorus. The next song I may do doubles all the way through. The next thing you know, you've been walking for 30 minutes and you've done 30 minutes worth of non-stop practicing.

It won't take long to notice a difference. For example, I started doing this when our lead singer brought in an original song and I couldn't make it through the first verse without wearing out because my riding hand was having to play at 191 BPM. I started working on it, and within a couple of weeks, I was able to play it. Now, I'm able to relax during the song. I posted a link to us playing it live.

View attachment 119334

Great idea. I'm wondering: do you select songs based on BPM or do you slow down/speed them up?
 

Push pull stroke

Platinum Member
I didn't use ear buds, because I was a sweat ball, but I use to run along to songs in my head. It would set my pace and often when I'd a hit a running wall the music would drive me through it to go longer distances or pick up my pace. It's crazy how it can give you a psychological and physical boost.

Indeed, plus the adrenaline from performing can help too, I’ve found. But I prefer not to practice to music, most of the time, to challenge myself.
 

1 hit wonder

Active Member
My current band plays twice a week, so my stamina came back quickly.

However, Tom Petty's Running Down a Dream was their starter, frequently. But there's no set list ever, so do I spend time warming up for a maybe? Last week I asked for it to come later in sets after warming up. Even then I play the ride part minus a 16th note, or in 8ths or minus two 16ths scattered in. Freebird, yes they play it. The snare 16ths in the guitar solo parts, I play it as quads with a double pedal and snare.

Yes, Freebird
In your face.
:)
 
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PorkPieGuy

Platinum Member
Great idea. I'm wondering: do you select songs based on BPM or do you slow down/speed them up?

No, I just put on my headphones and listen to XM radio. I play along with whatever comes on. If it's a slow song, I double the tempo.
 

eric_B

Senior Member
No, I just put on my headphones and listen to XM radio. I play along with whatever comes on. If it's a slow song, I double the tempo.
I see, it sure is more inspiring than playing along a metronome but you have little influence over the tempo, let alone slowly increasing every couple of minutes.
 

ottog1979

Senior Member
However, Tom Petty's Running Down a Dream was their starter, frequently. But there's no set list ever, so do I spend time warming up for a maybe? Last week I asked for it to come later in sets after warming up.
This is one reason why I always try to warm up before a gig for at least 10-15 minutes. I bring a pad and extra snare stand and either warm up on stage (smaller stages/ venues) or off/ behind stage. It's not quite the same as 20 minutes into a set but a lot better than starting cold. Why waste the first 3-4 songs before you're warm & fluid?
 

iCe

Silver Member
It's not that I'm trying to be a speed demon, either. I'm talking stuff like Ramones level 8th note hi hat work and spangalangs at fast tempos. I can do it for about 20 seconds and then the tension gets to me. Tried using different sticks, grips, fingers, practicing at slow tempos them building up to it, etc. Same results every time...OK for the first 10 seconds, then the tension starts to mount, then I have to let off it. Have that same problem with bass, too. I can be quite fast with my picking fingers when I want to be in short stretches, but need a pick to do long stretches like Joe Dart in "Deantown."

But as of yet, I haven't seen a drum pick, so I guess I need to deal with it another way. How do you all deal with it?

I'm a bit late to this party hehe
We do a Rush medley and there is some serious hihat action going on in there. Lot of 16th notes on the hihat (Tow Sawyer for example) with just one hand. There are several techniques available to use which one i use depends on how the muscles in my arms/hands feel.

Sometimes i use my fingers to create motion (move hand up and down, but use index and ring finger to "propel" the stick like a lot of drummers use in blast beats), sometimes i use a semi bastardized version of the the push/pull/Moeler technique, sometimes i go back and forth to relax the muscles after every few bars.


And also, yeah, practice :)
 
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