Expert Drumming Techniques

hugug

New Member
I've been drumming for a number of years now and not to toot my own horn (or bang my own drum as it would be) but I feel I've gotten pretty good. My question here is how can I make that last push from good drummer to great drummer? I am doing rudiments, metronome work, stick technique, etc, but I was just wondering if you guys could send me some links, videos or just what you do to help improve your playing. Like what your daily routine consists of, what books you own, what sites you use.. I am looking for advanced techniques to improve my game.
 

C. Dave Run

Gold Member
What is the goal here? Self improvement or musical improvement?

If self, get a teacher. Start a love affair with the click. Steal ideas from other drummers you look up to.

If musical, go play with musicians out of your league. Unless they are colossal jerks and you suck, you can only improve.
 

jda

Silver Member
in this post-covid environment if you can take every opportunity to play as may styles and even long extended stays in bands that are not your style (yet..)
Gigs. is what I'm trying to say. Gig as much as often as is possible. Variety of styles.

Backing up - and meshing with- 'other people' is where you'll find what and how what works
immerse your drumming hands (and feet) with others (lol)

Good Luck@ It ain't 1990 anymore (gig wise?) but power on!
 

BGDurham

Well-known Member
I concur that getting a teacher and/or a band is your next step. In my opinion a person can only go so far on their own, it often takes outsiders' perspective (e.g., a teacher or bandmates) to find and challenge your weakness so you can strengthen them. It's basically the plot of Rocky III: Rocky thought he was doing what he needed to do to be great, but he wasn't and Clubber Lang rocked his world. Apollo began coaching Rocky, challenged his weaknesses, and got him going again. I won't spoil the ending for everyone (;)), but that's my recommendation for you.
 

I-P

Active Member
I concur that getting a teacher and/or a band is your next step. In my opinion a person can only go so far on their own, it often takes outsiders' perspective (e.g., a teacher or bandmates) to find and challenge your weakness so you can strengthen them. It's basically the plot of Rocky III: Rocky thought he was doing what he needed to do to be great, but he wasn't and Clubber Lang rocked his world. Apollo began coaching Rocky, challenged his weaknesses, and got him going again. I won't spoil the ending for everyone (;)), but that's my recommendation for you.
rocky GIF
 

ZDrumMan

Member
There are a lot of smart people on this forum and a bunch of good ideas so far. Let me ask, how are you at controlling dynamics and tempo at the same time? It all plays into being a musician. When I started to struggle with playing musically, my technique was good. But I quickly found that if I had a, "ah-2-ee" pattern in my left hand with 2 being accented, my right also wanted to play 2 louder. Focusing on just making the left hand play the accent threw my tempo out the window - UNTIL I started to focus on making my playing musical. Somehow, that focus change made that two-hand independence work much more smoothly. Another thing I found is repetition. Just making your dynamics, correct and same note placement, and identical sound measure after measure (and after a fill) was a struggle as I was always creating and playing. I started to focus on grooves and found out just how much all of my techniques made me suck. Long story short, it is the details of playing that make your musicality shine and not physical prowess.
 

PorkPieGuy

Platinum Member
I have also had the question in years past, but what I do is try to have specific goals...and nothing abstract. I've all but quit trying to find that specific "key to unlock talent" and working on my transition from "good" to "great." I find specific things I want to learn, and then I work on those specific things...whether or not I'll ever use them. Here are some things I've specifically worked on in the past:

  • Learn the Roseanna shuffle.
  • Get my right hand where I can play 400 bpm comfortably for a few minutes so I would stop struggling playing at 382 bpm (in which a specific song requires).
  • Learn how to relax while playing a solid country swing.
  • Learn how to tune drums.

I feel that these sorts of goals are always more attainable than "going from good to great." I mean, ultimately, we all wanna be great at what we do, but having these big, abstract goals can sometimes be frustrating; however, if you have smaller, more manageable goals, it gives specific things to work on.

Hope this helps!
 

alparrott

Platinum Member
My daily routine includes listening to music and playing along to music (either recorded or with other musicians), working on my understanding and interpretation of the music and its needs. Dynamics, phrasing, being in lockstep with the other instruments, playing for the song/vocal/soloist, improvising, etc.

The mechanics of drumming are just a means to an end, which is music and musicality. Once you reach the point where you can access technique on demand, concentrate on being the best band member and ensemble musician you can be.
 

doggyd69b

Silver Member
I've been drumming for a number of years now and not to toot my own horn (or bang my own drum as it would be) but I feel I've gotten pretty good. My question here is how can I make that last push from good drummer to great drummer? I am doing rudiments, metronome work, stick technique, etc, but I was just wondering if you guys could send me some links, videos or just what you do to help improve your playing. Like what your daily routine consists of, what books you own, what sites you use.. I am looking for advanced techniques to improve my game.
At this point in your playing... can you play a song that you once considered really difficult and play it with what now seems like minimal effort? If you have, have you recorded it? maybe even video record it so that you can see and hear yourself and be really aware of your actual abilities. If you haven't, then find a song that you might consider challenging and give it a shot.
I for example don't find Rush's songs particularly challenging to play (the parts alone are not that hard) but to me the hard part is to have the patience to memorize ALL the combined parts that make a whole song. There are other songs (mostly metal) that are beyond my skill mostly because of the inhuman speed of the bass drum (rolls I can do just fine). So, while I think I am good, I am not by any means an expert.
 

beyondbetrayal

Platinum Member
I've been drumming for a number of years now and not to toot my own horn (or bang my own drum as it would be) but I feel I've gotten pretty good. My question here is how can I make that last push from good drummer to great drummer? I am doing rudiments, metronome work, stick technique, etc, but I was just wondering if you guys could send me some links, videos or just what you do to help improve your playing. Like what your daily routine consists of, what books you own, what sites you use.. I am looking for advanced techniques to improve my game.
Take lessons with someone better than you. Lots of pros do lessons. Rather than a techinque or beat, they will teach you a concept. a sticking, or group of stickings that you work on and build and can go a long way with. or create rules for your playing to stay within. it works great.
 

MG1127

Active Member
Books, videos, etc etc etc.

None of it means anything if you don't play music.

What is the point of learning an instrument?

To play music.

Want to improve?

Play music and make it feel right... learn how it's supposed to feel by listening obsessively.

There's not a book or video in the world that can teach you that.

The music will tell you what you suck at ... I promise
 
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