Expeience at a small music store.

Push pull stroke

Platinum Member
Called the store on the phone to see what's up with trying some gear out. Guy says "Owner's not here at this time I'm alone. Could you call back and maybe schedule a time to come in and try something?"
'No thank you.'

I truly just don't have the time or patience for this sort of thing, so it's off to
another shop when I'll need gear.
That same little snot? Wow
 

Reggae_Mangle

Silver Member
I *hate* having a salesman hovering over me when I'm checking out gear. It's okay if they ask "can I help you" or something, but the ones who start breathing down your neck when you're trying something really irritates me.

When that happens, I usually stop playing and walk out. Can sympathise with the OP in this case. You're a customer, not some thief coming in from the cold (which is how some of those store clerks act).
 

K Chez

Member
When I was shopping for my kit many moons ago, I had an ignorant salesman experience at a local shop. I knew what kit I wanted and was calling around (yes, we had to use a phone back before the internet!) to various shops checking pricing and availability. A Local shop was a Ludwig dealer, so I stopped in and they had what I was looking for, but in a different color. When I asked the sales guy how much the kit was, his reply was a sarcastic, "Oh, it's a lot!" and walks away! I was totally put off and was like FU and left. I had gotten several of the same quotes since most of the places probably didn't have what I wanted in stock and had to order it in. One shop in particular said they could have it much sooner than the others, so I was going to go with them, just had to make an hour plus trip to make the deposit and get it rolling. Before I was able to do that, I needed a head or some sticks in a pinch and went to the local place again since it was on my way to rehearsal. This time the owner was there, who I knew through him getting shirts from the screen printing shop where I worked. I mentioned I was getting a new kit and he asked why I wasn't getting it there - I told him what had happened and how his guy basically implied that I couldn't afford it, so I went elsewhere. He asked how much I was paying, so I gave him a number about $500 lower than it actually was. He goes behind the counter, gets out the price list and calculator. "wow, that's really a good price - I can't beat it, but I can match it." And they could get it two weeks sooner. So thanks to a crappy employee, I got a $500 discount.
 

trickg

Silver Member
There are so many interesting responses here.

Let's look at the thing with the kid asking you to stop hitting cymbals. He probably was trying to conduct business over the phone, but clearly he went about it in the wrong way. He probably should have said something along those lines - politely asked for a pause from the playing while on the phone. That's not too much to ask because cymbals are loud, and that kind of white noise makes it hard to speak over the phone. Sadly, customer service is a dying skill, and this store is suffering because of it.

Now let us address this bit about the music performance degree. I wish I had money for every time I gigged and had to tolerate someone with a music degree who was terrible. I have no performance degree. I have no degrees at all. However, I've got literally thousands of gigs under my belt with a 30+ year musical resume that would inspire envy among many. What I don't do is bludgeon people with the specifics of that resume - I go and I gig, and I try to humbly do my level best every time, no matter the gig or the venue. In cases of churches where I drum, oftentimes the other band members have no clue I'm also a trumpet player and singer.

I truly hope that's not something you'd actually say.

To the OP, it seems like you've done your best to give this store a chance, and also a second chance. It doesn't seem like they're interested in doing the kinds of things that's going to keep their business afloat during these times where Mom & Pop shops are closing down every day.
 

Push pull stroke

Platinum Member
There are so many interesting responses here.

Let's look at the thing with the kid asking you to stop hitting cymbals. He probably was trying to conduct business over the phone, but clearly he went about it in the wrong way. He probably should have said something along those lines - politely asked for a pause from the playing while on the phone. That's not too much to ask because cymbals are loud, and that kind of white noise makes it hard to speak over the phone. Sadly, customer service is a dying skill, and this store is suffering because of it.

Now let us address this bit about the music performance degree. I wish I had money for every time I gigged and had to tolerate someone with a music degree who was terrible. I have no performance degree. I have no degrees at all. However, I've got literally thousands of gigs under my belt with a 30+ year musical resume that would inspire envy among many. What I don't do is bludgeon people with the specifics of that resume - I go and I gig, and I try to humbly do my level best every time, no matter the gig or the venue. In cases of churches where I drum, oftentimes the other band members have no clue I'm also a trumpet player and singer.

I truly hope that's not something you'd actually say.

To the OP, it seems like you've done your best to give this store a chance, and also a second chance. It doesn't seem like they're interested in doing the kinds of things that's going to keep their business afloat during these times where Mom & Pop shops are closing down every day.
Why is this thread still going?
 

Mustion

Senior Member
The "personal touch" of a mom & pop is kind of a double edged sword. When I lived in the DC suburbs I went to a local store one day to pick up some sticks. After I bought what I needed and was going to the door the owner/only person there decided to go on a weird politics rant apropos of nothing. Not sure what about myself indicated I wanted to hear it much less agreed with his views (I didn't) but I can tell you I never went there ever again despite it being the closest store !
 

Lee-Bro

Senior Member
The "personal touch" of a mom & pop is kind of a double edged sword...the owner/only person there decided to go on a weird politics rant apropos of nothing. Not sure what about myself indicated I wanted to hear it much less agreed with his views (I didn't) but I can tell you I never went there ever again despite it being the closest store !
I've experienced this SEVERAL times w/ home repairs. I've had contractors come out w/ their (meaning they own it) company vehicle and to my surprise some of them have had some very polarizing and offensive political stickers on them, and I'm not talking about "Zildjian, the only serious choice" variety. I simply refuse to hire someone whose political stance is so alienating. As a result, I've had to give some of my business to some of the bigger nationally franchised service companies, when I really wanted to work w/ the independent guys. What's the same in drum shops is the same in house repairs.
 

Mustion

Senior Member
I've experienced this SEVERAL times w/ home repairs. I've had contractors come out w/ their (meaning they own it) company vehicle and to my surprise some of them have had some very polarizing and offensive political stickers on them, and I'm not talking about "Zildjian, the only serious choice" variety. I simply refuse to hire someone whose political stance is so alienating. As a result, I've had to give some of my business to some of the bigger nationally franchised service companies, when I really wanted to work w/ the independent guys. What's the same in drum shops is the same in house repairs.
Agreed. It isn't surprising that contractors may have viewpoints on a certain side of things, but it certainly isn't wise to advertise them. And, I feel that way regardless of whatever one believes. It's like the rules of what not to talk about at work (politics, sex, religion) have been forgotten in the twitter era. It's obviously naive to think that everybody you give money to shares your views, but they don't need to be put out there. Recently I got hooked by an overpriced product that was advertised incessantly on television in commercials featuring the charismatic company owner. As I went online to check it out, one of the first results in my search were tweets by said owner that not only did I disagree with, but seemed pretty unbecoming of a person in that role. I saved my money that day...
 

oldskoolsoul

Silver Member
..As I went online to check it out, one of the first results in my search were tweets by said owner that not only did I disagree with, but seemed pretty unbecoming of a person in that role. I saved my money that day..

To be honest, i think when you would go check everything out before buying (product and/or seller) regarding "honestly made", "political views" and all such things, you will end up buying nothing at all anymore..

The chance that you will meet a totally 'clean' person/product in any business, is kinda little..
 

Mustion

Senior Member
To be honest, i think when you would go check everything out before buying (product and/or seller) regarding "honestly made", "political views" and all such things, you will end up buying nothing at all anymore..

The chance that you will meet a totally 'clean' person/product in any business, is kinda little..
I agree, I actually made that point in the same post. The issue in this case was that with no digging at all--just looking up the product--I straightaway was presented with this guy's social media political rants (due to the way google presents search results, I guess) which turned me off right away. And honestly, regardless of the views presented, I'm not a fan of people using social media as a soapbox like that anyway.
 
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