Everybody's Kit Looks Cooler Than Mine

PorkPieGuy

Platinum Member
If it's any consolation, I swear it feels like almost everyone's kick drum pedals are set up better than mine, and I own two great pedals. When I try to improve them, they just get worse, so I just leave them where they are.
 

NouveauCliche

Senior Member
If it's any consolation, I swear it feels like almost everyone's kick drum pedals are set up better than mine, and I own two great pedals. When I try to improve them, they just get worse, so I just leave them where they are.
I have this exact same problem. Funny to hear it from someone else haha.
 

Xeno

Member
If it's any consolation, I swear it feels like almost everyone's kick drum pedals are set up better than mine, and I own two great pedals. When I try to improve them, they just get worse, so I just leave them where they are.
Yes! I played around on Scott Travis's kit once back in the 80's. He had the same pedals I had and they felt smooth as butter with great response. Never was able to get mine like that.
 

moxman

Silver Member
Odd setup - you're a rebel! My take is - ergonomics and ease of use.. as well as giving the audience something to look at. It bores me to death if I go to a show and can't see the drummer play because they have a wall of toms and cymbals in front blocking the view. I position my cymbals out to the sides and use low profile toms..and 'try' to sit up straight - no hunching! like the Germans told the Beatles 'Mak Show!'
 

Yamaha Rider

Well-known member
I've always managed to get my kits set up comfortably AND looking good (to my eye at least) but it is a trial and error process and consequently I now have one of almost every type of clamp/arm/attachment ever produced! :ROFLMAO:
Fab avatar! 😆
 

SmoothOperator

Gold Member
Always. I set my drums up from the driver's seat. I keep things low. When I look at them from the front I'm never happy. Yet whenever I see pictures of others' kits, I'm never displeased with what i see.* This is not a brand/color/size/hardware style thing. It's just a positioning thing. Is it just me?

*tom angles kits not included. That falling down Daru Jones kit either. He's a monster, but his kit LOOKS funny.
I think you can tell by looking at a kit when someone is compensating. Like they have looked for all kinds of shortcuts, overlapping cymbals, drums really close together, in odd patterns.

I think comes down to aesthetics at some point. I prefer all of my drums and cymbals to have some characteristic independence and space. EG the placement is not such that it is the fastest to get from point A to point B, but such that the instrument sounds the best where it is. Its a trade off, but I have long arms, and I prefer a little motion in my play.
 

cbphoto

Gold Member
If it's any consolation, I swear it feels like almost everyone's kick drum pedals are set up better than mine, and I own two great pedals. When I try to improve them, they just get worse, so I just leave them where they are.
  1. Adjust the height of the footboard so that its travel feels comfortable. Some guys like the travel low-to-lower, some guys want it zeroed (the neutral, starting position) at 45º. It seems it’s a matter of heel up or heel down style. Heel down guys typically have a lower zero-position footboard.
  2. Lower the beater height 1cm. It should feel very quick. If not, lower more. If it feels too puny, raise slightly. Some guys want the beater to strike at the center of the drum. I find this causes bounce-back and makes my beater dribble against the head. By striking the head off-center, bounce-back is reduced (quite a bit for a small distance off-center).
  3. Adjust spring tension for the new beater height.
  4. Buy those cool, blue glitter drummer shoes you’ve always wanted.
 

MrInsanePolack

Platinum Member
If you played out, would the setup change much?

There's precious little room to move
Probably not. I've been doing the 2 rides thing for years now, that wont change. The center hats are about 6 months new, but I really dig it.

Honestly this isnt a problem. No matter how I arrange the kit, my inspiration is at the drivers seat, not the front. I look at others peoples kits, and they look great from the front. Not so much the drivers seat for me.

Perfect example, your Guru kit. The pic of it all set up in double bass configuration is beautiful. I could never play it like that though. Toms are too high, stuff is too spread out and far away. But it looks cool.
 

Dr_Watso

Platinum Member
I may as well be ray charles with my stage setup because the only thing that matters to me is how it sounds. No way would I compromise play-ability for looks.
 

wraub

Well-known member
In both of these posts, you mention that you find the view from the driver's seat inspiring... I'm still relatively new to the drum thing, but... isn't that kinda the point? The front view is for others, but to set down in player position and find the position inspiring is the key to new places, imo.
But, again, still new, and, also, not you :), so, ymmv and whatnot.

I find my set inspiring from every angle, and the inspiration is to play, to grow, to create, to dust and polish, and maybe, sometimes, just hit stuff. :D But in the driver's seat, it's the inspiration that moves me to try.

Then again, I may just need coffee.





Not necessarily this one in particular. Just any if them. I set my drums from behind. The view in the front never really strikes me as inspiring because of it. It doesnt matter. I dont think it means anything and it certainly doesn't bother me or I wouldn't set up so differently. The front view just doesn't inspire me. The drivers seat, sure. Just seems weird.
Probably not. I've been doing the 2 rides thing for years now, that wont change. The center hats are about 6 months new, but I really dig it.

Honestly this isnt a problem. No matter how I arrange the kit, my inspiration is at the drivers seat, not the front. I look at others peoples kits, and they look great from the front. Not so much the drivers seat for me.

Perfect example, your Guru kit. The pic of it all set up in double bass configuration is beautiful. I could never play it like that though. Toms are too high, stuff is too spread out and far away. But it looks cool.
 
Last edited:

MrInsanePolack

Platinum Member
In both of these posts, you mention that you find the view from the driver's seat inspiring... I'm still relatively new to the drum thing, but... isn't that kinda the point? The front view is for others, but to set down in player position and find the position inspiring is the key to new places, imo.
But, again, still new, and, also, not you :), so, ymmv and whatnot.

I find my set inspiring from every angle, and the inspiration is to play, to grow, to create, to dust and polish, and maybe, sometimes, just hit stuff. :D But in the driver's seat, it's the inspiration that moves me to try.

Then again, I may just need coffee.
I just find it odd that I can look at someone elses kit from the front and get excited about it, but not so much mine. That's all.
 

SYMBOLIC DEATH

Senior Member
I just find it odd that I can look at someone elses kit from the front and get excited about it, but not so much mine. That's all.
Are you able to specifically pick out what you don't like about the view of the front of your kit? I get that it doesn't do anything for you, but what specifically is causing that?
 

MrInsanePolack

Platinum Member
Are you able to specifically pick out what you don't like about the view of the front of your kit? I get that it doesn't do anything for you, but what specifically is causing that?
I think it's a height thing. All my stuff is low and flat. It's great to play, but looks funny. Oh well, I'm not losing sleep over it.

You're sure about that? Do your clothes compliment the set finish? An underdiscussed trick that all the masters know.
Speaking of sleep, we have sheets in that exact same zebra pattern as the curtains in the first pic.
 

Armor of Light

Senior Member
I could not care less about someones set up, tom angles or whatever, as long as their playing is ok..

This set up is maybe also not looking “cool”, but who cares if you can play like he plays..

For everyone not familiar, thats Tony Allen on the pic, who will make any set up look “cool” btw lol..


View attachment 93692
Eww..those tom mounts. JK! I love Pearl and that guy is awesome.
 

GOOSE72

Well-known member
Yes. Apparently you can't be good AND have a nice looking kit. All time drum related should be spent perfecting your playing and getting your drums set up "ergonomically" instead of worrying about what your kit looks like.
Neil Peart probably could have been a good drummer if he hadn't had those legless stands, the custom inlays on his toms or those smaller toms mounted so damn high over his hi-hat stand. We won't even get into the gold plated hardware. I'm sure that affected his rudiments drastically. Nicko McBrain probably could have rocked out if he didn't have such deep toms and his ride cymbal so high. Speaking of high ride cymbals, you can see Danny Carey really struggle on ride patterns with that thing up there and at such an angle. He'd be a much better drummer if it was flat and over his bass drum for sure. Then there's Simon Phillips....talk about tom overkill and cymbals almost out of reach. He's got nothing on Jack White. :rolleyes:

I hate to break it to some of you, but form and function are not mutually exclusive.
J-W I agree with almost everything you said.
 
Top