Everybody's Kit Looks Cooler Than Mine

MntnMan62

Junior Member
Form over function is typically not the way to go when you are doing something that takes lots of practice and skill to do it well. It doesn't matter what your drums look like. All that matters is that you sound good playing them. If by setting them up to look good, you feel uncomfortable while playing them, how does that help you get and keep gigs? It doesn't. Don't be so shallow. Appreciate your drums for looking good for the way you play them.
 

GOOSE72

Well-known member
They were not unplayable for him. That was awesome. I would be in hospice care after trying 30 seconds of what he did on that kit.
 

roncadillac

Member
Wooooo buddy, I would shred on that tight set up all day. Nice!

Maybe you associate the look with having toms up high? I commonly gig 2pc and 3pc kits and I also feel my kit looks 'weird' or atleast lacking when I look at it from the crowd POV. However, I always get compliments on what I do with so little so apparently no one else looks down upon it.

You do you, homie.

Throw some octobons up to your right and riff on some 80s King Crimson grooves.
 

SYMBOLIC DEATH

Senior Member
Are you running 2 x-hats?
I think if you are able to do what you want to do on it, then who cares what it looks like. When you're playing live shows again that's when we break out the Voelker rack with chain cymbal booms.
 

Odd-Arne Oseberg

Platinum Member
I get that some old school rock, rockabilly etc... cover bands want to look authentic, but otherwise I don't really get how the looking cool part factors in.

I've met some people who obsess over it, but I can't say I've seen much when it comes to my favourite musicians care much.
 

J-W

Well-known member
So does this mean that people whose kits look aesthetically pleasing are somehow not being ergonomic and could be playing “wrong”? Are they poseurs?
Yes. Apparently you can't be good AND have a nice looking kit. All time drum related should be spent perfecting your playing and getting your drums set up "ergonomically" instead of worrying about what your kit looks like.
Neil Peart probably could have been a good drummer if he hadn't had those legless stands, the custom inlays on his toms or those smaller toms mounted so damn high over his hi-hat stand. We won't even get into the gold plated hardware. I'm sure that affected his rudiments drastically. Nicko McBrain probably could have rocked out if he didn't have such deep toms and his ride cymbal so high. Speaking of high ride cymbals, you can see Danny Carey really struggle on ride patterns with that thing up there and at such an angle. He'd be a much better drummer if it was flat and over his bass drum for sure. Then there's Simon Phillips....talk about tom overkill and cymbals almost out of reach. He's got nothing on Jack White. :rolleyes:

I hate to break it to some of you, but form and function are not mutually exclusive.
 

MrInsanePolack

Platinum Member
I don't think it's question of whether it's a cool setup or not. It's certainly not traditional. Is it one bass drum? I can't tell. Do you ever use rack toms and if so, where would they go?
Not necessarily this one in particular. Just any if them. I set my drums from behind. The view in the front never really strikes me as inspiring because of it. It doesnt matter. I dont think it means anything and it certainly doesn't bother me or I wouldn't set up so differently. The front view just doesn't inspire me. The drivers seat, sure. Just seems weird.
 

Darth Vater

Senior Member
Not necessarily this one in particular. Just any if them. I set my drums from behind. The view in the front never really strikes me as inspiring because of it. It doesnt matter. I dont think it means anything and it certainly doesn't bother me or I wouldn't set up so differently. The front view just doesn't inspire me. The drivers seat, sure. Just seems weird.
I think I'd have to see it from the front to understand what you're shooting for. I'm pretty old skool but I've often wondered about using a remote hi hat. If I did I'd probably have it off to the right underneath my ride. I don't get that Jack White setup at all but hey if that's his bag so be it.
 

bud7h4

Silver Member
Always. I set my drums up from the driver's seat. I keep things low. When I look at them from the front I'm never happy. Yet whenever I see pictures of others' kits, I'm never displeased with what i see.* This is not a brand/color/size/hardware style thing. It's just a positioning thing. Is it just me?
😄 I thought it was just me too. I do actually like the way my kit looks in person but it never translates to photos except for the overhead pics. I've taken a few dozen pics, and the only ones I like are overhead.
 
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KEEF

Senior Member
I've always managed to get my kits set up comfortably AND looking good (to my eye at least) but it is a trial and error process and consequently I now have one of almost every type of clamp/arm/attachment ever produced! :ROFLMAO:
 

cbphoto

Gold Member
My take: function over form. If it doesn‘t feel good or doesn’t fit I arrange the gear until it does. The foundation is the throne height, snare height & tilt, bass pedal position & tension, hi hat pedal position & tension. Everything else is fluid, and I’ve tried many different arrangements for toms & cymbals.

I never consider looks important ’cuz, you know, I look so good I could play trash cans and no one would notice.

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