Every Groove Essentials 2.0 Groove

Seafroggys

Silver Member
Here's my first post-mortem post.....about statistics. Probably not that interesting to most, but it's interesting to me!

So like I said, this whole project took 5 years, 11 months, 21 days (just a week and a half shy of 6 years). That's roughly an average of 1 video every 30 days, or once a month. However, the actual variance was pretty wild. In 2015 I did 9 (including the first one, which was the tail end of 2014), there was a long gap in the summer as I got busy setting up a new band. 2016 was my most prolific year, did 32 videos. That has to do with the fact I moved back in with my parents (and thus, my studio) temporarily, and for about 3 months I was pumping out videos left and right very quickly. These were the last of the rock videos, and all the funk and r&b videos. 2017 slowed down again, only did 6 videos, the jazz section and the first video of the specialty section. This is mainly because the I set up my Bop drums to do the jazz vids and was too lazy to switch back to my regular set for a long, long time. Then, in 2018 I recorded zero videos (more on that later). Got back to it in 2019, did the bulk of the specialty videos and scored 10 videos. Then in 2020 was my second most prolific year at 15 videos, the rest of the specialty videos and all the odd-meter vids.

The longest gap in time between videos was between Groove 80 slow and Groove 80 fast....a total of 487 days, or near a year and a half. This was the reason why I didn't play anything in 2018. The next longest was between Groove 87 slow and Groove 87 fast, which was about 7 months; this took up the first half of this year, meaning my 15 vids this year was squished all into the second half. The third longest was between Groove 82 slow and Groove 82 fast, which was back in mid 2019 and took 6 months. All 3 were in the specialty category, and all 3 took so long because of sheer physical difficulty; I could not physically play that fast. It wasn't a mental thing, even in isolation my sticks just couldn't play the speeds required of me. They all required woodshedding. I'd say Groove 87 fast was the hardest in the book, but I also spent the most time woodshedding that. I could have practiced 82 fast a lot more, but that was also when I moved back out of my parents and I spent less time at my studio because I wanted to get away from them, ahaha.

So breaking down by section; the fastest section I went through was funk. Like mentioned earlier, this was during my 2016 blitz, did an average of 1 video every 6 days, or faster than one a week. Next quickest was this year's odd-meter section, which I practiced a lot because of quarantine so I learned it fast, with one video every 12 days. Next was the R&B section, which was during the 2016 blitz, with one video every 2 weeks. After that it slows down quite a bit; the rock section was one video every 24 days. It was the largest section at 22 videos, and was part of the 2016 blitz, but there were also long gaps prior to that as well (the fourth longest gap was in this section, between 52 slow and fast, at 5 months). Then the jazz section, only 5 videos, was 34 days per video, largely due to a few months off between the RnB section and the jazz, but the frequency once I started was fairly quick. Then the specialty section at one video every 72 days, or over one every two months; even though there were two sections of quick released videos, the overall average was really affected by the three videos mentioned earlier and the sheer amount of time between them. From the end of the last jazz video, to the last specialty video, this section took me 1182 days, or over 3 years. So pretty much half the time I spent on this entire project was spent just on that one section, and it wasn't even the largest section!

I even ran some stats on shirts I wore during videos? Won't spend too much time on here, but there's a 3 way tie with 5 videos each; a generic black shirt, my "There's no Planet B" shirt, and no shirt. Five shirts I no longer have. About half the shirts are only worn once. Some shirts I'm surprised at how few times I wore them, considering how much I like them. What shocked me the most was my ultimate drum shirt, my "Save a Drum Bang a Drummer shirt," which when I calculated the stats after recording groove 99, I never wore at all during any of these videos. So that's why I wore it for Groove 100....end on a good note ;)

Anyway, that's it for statistics, I'll make another post in a few days about the actual playing.
 

GetAgrippa

Platinum Member
How did your beard score LOL-just kidding. I've really enjoyed the "ride'. 5 years that's dedication man which section did you personally like best-funk, rock, jazz, etc? And how do you think it has impacted your playing and would you do it again? I find it all very inspiring kudos for that as well as your own personal goal attainment. Of all the grooves you learned which you think most applicable in real-time playing and you find yourself falling into those patterns? And thanks for posting the whole experience-I find it all fascinating. Even the time element-the clothes stuff I don't notice-you could have been naked on all of them. I did notice the beard though LOL. And you have great drumming posture-I still slump and can't manage a smile if it killed me.
 
Here's my first post-mortem post.....about statistics. Probably not that interesting to most, but it's interesting to me!

So like I said, this whole project took 5 years, 11 months, 21 days (just a week and a half shy of 6 years).

Very interesting to me, and I remain so damn impressed by your diligence.
 

Seafroggys

Silver Member
Thank you guys. I plan on self-reviewing every video, may not post the whole thing but maybe like the top 10 and bottom 5 or something like that.

As mentioned before, yes I have used some of these grooves for gigs. Groove 50, 51, 67, 82, 84, and others. I distinctly remember using Groove 50 for a charity gig back in 2015 (I had only learned and recorded the video a few months earlier, so it was still fresh in my memory) and the guy who wrote the song was really impressed with the choice of groove I used for his song, calling it unique and perfect. So that was cool.

But really, and especially going back through some of the earlier posts in this thread, I learned more than that. I got better playing to a steady tempo, with musicians that do not adapt to your own mistakes (since its, you know, a recording). I got better at not rushing fills, which I use to do a lot. I got better at woodshedding new grooves. A lot of those early videos, I was a little too eager, I maybe worked out the groove on my own with no metronome, then jumped right into it when it wasn't really ready yet. But now, especially the last 20 videos or so, I slowed way down, turned on the metronome, and learned it SLOW to a click. Then slowly sped it up. Eventually I could play it at speed, in time, and it felt good. Which is why the hard odd-meter grooves turned out very well because I worked on them a lot. Go back to Groove 48 Fast....fairly easy groove, but boy that did not feel and sit well. It wasn't because I was technically a much shittier drummer, I was fully competent to play it perfectly back then, but my methodology back then was far more rushed and less thorough.

I'd say overall, my least favorite sections, to play, the quality of the backing track, and also the quality of my playing, was probably the Rock and RnB sections. Funk and Odd-Meter were probably my best overall sections. Specialty had some blah stuff in there but otherwise that turned out well. Jazz was in the middle, it was overall really fun, but the absolute worst of my performances was in this one (Groove 79).
 

Seafroggys

Silver Member
Shit sorry for double posting, but something exciting came up today!

So it turns out Hudson Music (the publishers of GE) is hosting a drum competition for Groove Essential videos! It's about to end but I just found out today (I'm a follower of Tommy Igoe on FB). I told him I recorded videos for all the GE 2.0 stuff and he told me to look at the list and submit one of them!

So there is a select list that we have to choose from (Hudson is providing the charts and backing tracks for free so those who don't have GE can participate) from both 1.0 and 2.0. So I got that list, and I can't decide which ones I want to do. I immediately dismissed 58 slow and 97 since I think those aren't as good, even though 97 is the most recent. But of the remaining ones, what one do you think is the best? At this point it's starting to get subjective, but I can't really pick.


I know I have no chance in hell of winning....there's some obnoxiously good drummers out there than can kick my ass twelve ways, but it would be fun to submit. I'm thinking the brushes one might give me the best shot if I'm thinking strategically, but I want to legit put my best foot forward here.
 

Seafroggys

Silver Member
So....I'm not done ;)

The Global Tours at the back of the book are medleys of a bunch of the different songs/grooves.....5 at a time! So it's 15+ minutes of playing, quickly switching from one to another with usually a 2 measure solo. I was planning on doing just the Global Tours from Groove Essentials 2, but then realize.....except for 3 special videos, I haven't done the GE 1 tracks (nor do I have plans on doing them), so why not start with those so I could learn those?

So here it is, the first Global Tour, featuring rock, jazz shuffle, calypso, funk, and a baiao samba. Man that baiao samba was killer. Since it's such a long piece, my 'standards' for mistakes are more relaxed, so there's some boffed fills in there, but for being literally take two, I'm pretty happy.

 

Seafroggys

Silver Member
And next Global Tour!

This one was overall harder than the first one, but I only spent about half the time learning. It's actually pretty good, except for my Songo (that's rough, but I survive it).

The five grooves are a fast swing, slow rock, 2nd Line, Songo (Afro-Cuban groove), and a Merengue.

 
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