Ever regret buying a drumset?

drumnut87

Well-known member
not regretted buying, but definitely regretted selling some. bought a few clangers in cymbals though. like a HHX stage ride, sounded gongy and with a dull bell.
 

bermuda

Drummerworld Pro Drummer - Administrator
Staff member
Absolutely.

In 1984 I bought a brand new Sonor Phonic Plus (I think) 5-pc including all hardware for $1500. they looked great and the Sonor quality is (generally) hard to beat.

They were the worst-sounding drums I've ever owned, or played. No tone, not even from the metal snare (how do you screw up a metal snare?)

A few years after they just sat at home, I traded them for a Syndrum Quad set-up, which I still have. I normally don't prefer to let gear go, but I was glad to be rid of those.

Bermuda
 

drumnut87

Well-known member
Absolutely.

In 1984 I bought a brand new Sonor Phonic Plus (I think) 5-pc including all hardware for $1500. they looked great and the Sonor quality is (generally) hard to beat.

They were the worst-sounding drums I've ever owned, or played. No tone, not even from the metal snare (how do you screw up a metal snare?)

A few years after they just sat at home, I traded them for a Syndrum Quad set-up, which I still have. I normally don't prefer to let gear go, but I was glad to be rid of those.

Bermuda
wow, thats impressive they managed to let them go through with that bad a tone.
 

Darth Vater

Senior Member
Yep, Yamaha Stage Custom and Gretsch Catalina Maple. Considering I've owned 19 different kits over the years I don't think that's too bad.
 

larryace

"Uncle Larry"
I lost money on snare drum once but I don't regret owning them (Canopus Zelkova)

I learned a lot from that drum. Namely what I don't care for. (really sharp bearing edges and vertical grain)

Other than that it was really cool to see how they made it. The inside was gorgeous. I was very intrigued with it in Sam Ash.

After the honeymoon was over, I realized that it wasn't working for me.

I hardly ever sell stuff.

My worst sounding kit (out of the box) I have experience with was a Yamaha Gigmaster. It was hard to find a new set with a 20" bass drum that I didn't have to wait for. So I gave them a shot. The most choked set of brand new drums I ever heard.

I had to:

1. ISO mount the rack toms
2. Get 3 air suspension feet for the floor tom
3. Remove every stinking rubber lug gasket on every stinking drum, and make damn sure that no one could ever use them again.
4. Brush lacquer the interiors of all the drums. (Stinky!)

In addition to reheading and lubricating everything.

After that they sounded good enough that I didn't want to push ice picks in my ears when I played them.
 

Benthedrummer

Junior Member
I bought a second hand Tama Rockstar DX.

Piano black, long lugs etc etc.

The bass drum was absolutely bloody awful.

The toms were lifeless no matter what I did to them.

Just a dreadful pile of plies and chrome.

Regret selling my Premier Genista......BIG time.
 

Benthedrummer

Junior Member
I lost money on snare drum once but I don't regret owning them (Canopus Zelkova)

I learned a lot from that drum. Namely what I don't care for. (really sharp bearing edges and vertical grain)

Other than that it was really cool to see how they made it. The inside was gorgeous. I was very intrigued with it in Sam Ash.

After the honeymoon was over, I realized that it wasn't working for me.

I hardly ever sell stuff.

My worst sounding kit (out of the box) I have experience with was a Yamaha Gigmaster. It was hard to find a new set with a 20" bass drum that I didn't have to wait for. So I gave them a shot. The most choked set of brand new drums I ever heard.

I had to:

1. ISO mount the rack toms
2. Get 3 air suspension feet for the floor tom
3. Remove every stinking rubber lug gasket on every stinking drum, and make damn sure that no one could ever use them again.
4. Brush lacquer the interiors of all the drums. (Stinky!)

In addition to reheading and lubricating everything.

After that they sounded good enough that I didn't want to push ice picks in my ears when I played them.
Funny you should mention the Yammy Gigmaker.

Just bought a second hand one in 10,12,14, 20 configuration......... absolutely LOVE it.

So much bark and cut.
 

C.M. Jones

Well-known member
Yes, my first kit ever in the 1980s. It was a Ludwig, and while the drums themselves were okay, the hardware was another matter. The experience turned me off from Ludwig, and I vowed not to buy from them again. That oath might be unfair, as I know they make good equipment, but I can't shake my early disappointments. Even so, I do have sentimental memories of that set, so I can't say it was a comprehensively bad stage of ownership.

I sold the Ludwig set three years later and switched to Pearl. I've bought nothing but Pearl kits for over thirty years, and I've never regretted any of them. I have no real desire to play anything but Pearl. They're my manufacturer. Because I don't acquire equipment from multiple drum makers for the sake of sampling it or through some misguided effort to conquer boredom, I save a lot of time, money, and regret. How much equipment do we really need anyway -- not equipment we're semi-curious about but need?
 
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Bo Eder

Platinum Member
I bought a used Pearl Vision that I ended up regretting - for some reason the spurs were mounted a little off and to make the drum level, one leg was shorter than the other. This must’ve been one of those “B” stock kits you hear about so often. I sold it pretty quickly.
 

Darth Vater

Senior Member
I lost money on snare drum once but I don't regret owning them (Canopus Zelkova)

I learned a lot from that drum. Namely what I don't care for. (really sharp bearing edges and vertical grain)
Don't let that Zelkova sour you on sharp edges and vertical grain. That thing is a doorstop. I had one for about 2 weeks. Like you I was impressed with the construction and looks. It also had excellent articulation but to be honest, that Zelkova wood (Redwood) really blows for drum sound. I certainly wouldn't use that thing for a general reference on bearing edges or grain direction.
 

drumnut87

Well-known member
I bought a second hand Tama Rockstar DX.

Piano black, long lugs etc etc.

The bass drum was absolutely bloody awful.

The toms were lifeless no matter what I did to them.

Just a dreadful pile of plies and chrome.

Regret selling my Premier Genista......BIG time.
i got the tama rockstar made in japan model, i find the toms sound good off the mount, but soon as you put them on the tom mount they lose a lot of their tone and go quite dead.
 

drumnut87

Well-known member
as for actually buying a drum, i remember buying a tama starclassic performer birch/bubinga snare, and unless i cranked it tabletop tight both heads the thing sounded absolutely horrid, tired multiple head and tuning combos and it would not have it whatsoever.
 

paradiddle pete

Platinum Member
I've whittled it down to Gretsch USA, Rogers, Craviotto and Sleishman.... Tried most of them but not for me ..... not really regretting buying any sets as they all have a purpose and a lesson to be learnt... I Know the ones I won't buy again..Same goes for Cymbals..
 

caddywumpus

Platinum Member
Nope. Every drum set I've bought has taught me something. Sometimes it has to do with how cool a particular drum set sounds. Sometimes it teaches me that I'm glad I don't play that particular kit.
 
Back in the days when average drummers used to have only one drum set, I bought a brand new Sonor Lite in scandi birch. I saved all my money to replace the matching snare with a Sonor Signature HLD 562, which was a tad more expensive.
While the Lites were my dream for many years, I never really liked the snare drum that much. Even though it was a fine piece of craftsmanship, I am more into lighter drums without die cast hoops :)
 
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