Ever feel like going back to your roots and using pie tins as cymbals?

CommanderRoss

Silver Member
The description was priceless!:

"Sabian's new 2" Pie Hats really put the "trash" in trashy! The price tag may be high, but they have a beautiful crisp, dark sound, getting out of the way almost instantly for the rest of your groove. A perfect addition to any kit."

When I was a broke teenager, I'd make my own cymbals from sheet metal. Funny thing is, many of those early attempts are common now in the stack configs I see.

Maybe I was onto something & didn't know it. ;-)
 

Bo Eder

Platinum Member
The description was priceless!:

"Sabian's new 2" Pie Hats really put the "trash" in trashy! The price tag may be high, but they have a beautiful crisp, dark sound, getting out of the way almost instantly for the rest of your groove. A perfect addition to any kit."

When I was a broke teenager, I'd make my own cymbals from sheet metal. Funny thing is, many of those early attempts are common now in the stack configs I see.

Maybe I was onto something & didn't know it. ;-)
Nah, you just had no way of marketing that trash and convincing all the youngins to spend all their money on junk!
 
M

MasterBlaster

Guest
I'd get the larger one, maybe toss in a rivet or two.
 

Frank

Gold Member
I never tried the pie tins in the old days.

I Did, though, play the coffee cans as a little guy. I can remember doing that as a 4 or 5 year old.

I was very happy to see the wave of super affordable yet good sounding low end kits. The good news today is that a young student can get started on some very nice sounding equipment - without needing a second mortgage. That wasn't the case 50 years ago. You either started with a very incomplete kit, or, you bought one of the "imported" kits that were terrible quality.
[we used to use another term for these kits 50 years ago, but it is an inappropriate term.]

I spent my first years playing on real junk. An incomplete, low end old used kit with no snare and a single terrible cymbal. I would tape electrical wire to the reso of the large tom and attempt to use it as a snare drum. It was such a dramatic difference between what I felt and heard at home v.s. what I felt and heard when I jumped on my teacher's beautiful, big, shiny, awesome sounding white Rogers kit in his studio for the Saturday morning lessons. Those were the days. Didn't know it then, but man, those were the days.
 

Dr_Watso

Platinum Member
I collected old butter tubs when I was a kid for my play drumming. Even had special longer pencils I saved just for the purpose.

Sometimes I'd use metal bowls as "cymbals". Never tins like that.
 
M

MasterBlaster

Guest
Garage Pert!

As a child, I'd set up a kit made from various trash cans and rock out in the garage while my dad was at work. He couldn't stand it, but Mom was cool.

My cymbals were the lids... unique tone!
 

markdrum

Silver Member
Yeah, My Mom used to have a set of mixing bowls with flat bottoms. She finally had to hide them from me but they weren't bad.
 

J-Boogie

Gold Member
Love the traffic cone John! I love yelling through those things, adds bass and volume, must do the same for bass drum. Very interesting!
 
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