Electronic kit equals more practice

I'm using low volume cymbals and Black Hole RTom heads. I prefer that setup to my old e-kit, but I still have the same problem. It's great for memorizing songs, but I can't really do anything other than bash. There's just no real "feel" or nuance. That would have been fine during my bashing days, but it kinda sucks now. The only e-kits I've liked are the high-end Roland kits, and those are out of my snack bracket. For that kind of money, it would make more sense to invest in a sound booth than an e-kit.
The other thing is e-kits are not the greatest investment. When I think about all the money I wasted on midi drums back in the late ‘80s (during the time when I hardly had any money), if I had bought regular drums instead, they would have held their value or be worth even more! Does anyone want to buy a Roland PM-16 pad to midi interface that I bought new for 1500 bucks? It doesn’t even have any sounds on it…LOL.
If you haven’t noticed, the exception of course is the original Simmons drums/modules (the only electronic drums that were ever really cool), which are now selling for a fortune! Now I wish I didn’t sell mine
 
I've had a Roland TD-17KVX for a few years. I bought it to practice in the house whenever I wanted. It DID give me more practice time, but my improvements in playing were slightly lost when going back to the acoustic for rehearsal and gigging. So, I decided to take it to the rehearsal space and bring my acoustic kit home. The biggest drawback of the ekit for me was the flippin' hi-hat, not to mention the layout constraints and goofy sounding drums. The band, however, loved it since it eliminated the volume wars, but I was fed up with playing it. In addition, practicing on the acoustic at home still meant playing in the garage and limiting to reasonable hours in order to keep the neighbors happy. What to do?

One day, I saw a video on YouTube about EFNOTE. After hours and hours of scouring videos and forum posts, I decided to "gamble" and purchase their flagship, the 7X. I had high hopes, but was still nervous... until I set it up and played it. It "feels" like an acoustic kit. It sounds like many one, too. It exceeded my expectations.

The other day, I schlepped it over to the rehearsal studio, plugged it into the PA, and played with the band for about 5 hours. It sounded absolutely incredible! We are a cover band that play a wide variety of genres, and the ability to change kits on the fly to fit the song made everyone smile. I am now considering selling my acoustic, cymbals, and Roland kit to buy an EFNOTE 5 ("bop" size) to keep in the rehearsal space.

No more fiddling with tuning and micing or chopping wood. We have a bar gig in a couple weeks and I'm going to use the 7X for the first time "live," and I cannot wait.
I don’t get it. Why make electronic drums that look like real drums? For that price you should at least get the convenience of not having to haul all that gear around
 
I don’t get it. Why make electronic drums that look like real drums? For that price you should at least get the convenience of not having to haul all that gear around
It does look cooler but secretly I agree :)
 
The other thing is e-kits are not the greatest investment. When I think about all the money I wasted on midi drums back in the late ‘80s (during the time when I hardly had any money), if I had bought regular drums instead, they would have held their value or be worth even more!

This lesson took me some time to learn. There are a handful of reputable sellers on ebay with all kinds of used Roland pads and modules, more or less half the price of new gear.
When you ever decide to sell it your only loss is in the shipping costs and any sellers' fees.
 
I definitely practice a hell of a lot more with my electronic kit. Plus, my timing is much better because I usually play along to the radio or music files. It is a little different from my acoustic kits, but I got a Roland VAD kit, which are basically 12 and 14 inch wood-shelled drums. All the hardware is the same as an acoustic kit, including a realDW 5000 double bass pedal and a real Hi-hat stand. I couldn’t get used to the electronic hi-hat cymbals, so I bought some little black 10 inch Stagg cymbals to replace them with. They are louder, but they sound and work great. It does take a little warming up to get used to the acoustic drums when I do a gig, but not nearly as much a problem as you’d think. I simply love my electronic practice kit.
 
Forgive me if this is a dumb question, but with almost everyone recommending owning a practice pad for practice, isn't an Ekit pretty much a deluxe practice pad that has the ability to put out sounds like drums?
Yes, practice pads with sounds. I like the sound with headphones. And the customers at the bar like the barnyard animal sounds.
 
Yes, practice pads with sounds. I like the sound with headphones. And the customers at the bar like the barnyard animal sounds.
Ya, I used to work with a keyboard player who drove us completely nuts with barking dogs when sampling keyboards first became affordable. Just remember that a little goes a very long way :)
 
What's the jazz drummers resource?

Thanks,
Caroline
Came across the Jazz Drummers Resource on YouTube; "52 licks", 1 new jazz phrase each week. They were posted about 10 years ago but only just come across them.
I quite like them for the down to earth way they are presented... no 'the secret to awesome drumming pros don't want you to know' stuff, just straight forward, no frills tuition. I started with #34, Philly Joe's inverted double stroke and having great fun.
 
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I don’t get it. Why make electronic drums that look like real drums? For that price you should at least get the convenience of not having to haul all that gear around

They look like real drums, play like real drums and sound like real drums. I'd argue they are real drums. For that price I get nearly 20 kits in one.

I've never before been a real fan of edrums and had NEVER considered playing them live. But, here I am.

Perhaps counterintuitively, I now have less gear to haul around and it doesn't take me as long to set up. No tuning. No mics. Only thing that remains to be seen is how soundcheck goes, but I anticipate a much shorter time based on how it went in the rehearsal space.
 
They look like real drums, play like real drums and sound like real drums. I'd argue they are real drums. For that price I get nearly 20 kits in one.

I've never before been a real fan of edrums and had NEVER considered playing them live. But, here I am.

Perhaps counterintuitively, I now have less gear to haul around and it doesn't take me as long to set up. No tuning. No mics. Only thing that remains to be seen is how soundcheck goes, but I anticipate a much shorter time based on how it went in the rehearsal space.
I really like using my Ekit with the covers band, as you say, 20 kits in one.
No mics and no tuning is true but I've found that the vagaries of PA systems have a dramatic affect on the reproduction of the kit, more so than mic'ing drums. You'd think drum samples would be the same but apparently it's not. Make sure you're familiar with editing your kit before you do a live sound check, especially eq'ing options.
 
I really like using my Ekit with the covers band, as you say, 20 kits in one.
No mics and no tuning is true but I've found that the vagaries of PA systems have a dramatic affect on the reproduction of the kit, more so than mic'ing drums. You'd think drum samples would be the same but apparently it's not. Make sure you're familiar with editing your kit before you do a live sound check, especially eq'ing options.
That's a great point! Fortunately (?), we use our own PA system with XAir mixer with configs based on the venue (very few of them), but your point is well-taken. I imagine it will be a bit more involved if we ever decide to gig at a venue with their own sound.
 
They look like real drums, play like real drums and sound like real drums. I'd argue they are real drums. For that price I get nearly 20 kits in one.

I've never before been a real fan of edrums and had NEVER considered playing them live. But, here I am.

Perhaps counterintuitively, I now have less gear to haul around and it doesn't take me as long to set up. No tuning. No mics. Only thing that remains to be seen is how soundcheck goes, but I anticipate a much shorter time based on how it went in the rehearsal space.
This is probably a ridiculous idea, but if each of your drums had a speaker in it (and there is room for that), than that would be a real evolution in electronic drums...where the sound actually comes out of the drums! This is the only way to me that they could actually start to approach real drums. What are you going to use for your personal sound reinforcement?
 
I have a handheld JBL flip speaker thst I play with that limits my max volume. So I play along to that now and I can play low enough no more complaints- that drove me to ekit. Something to add to my tool box- keeping it quiet. I cut old heads for dampening rings to tone kit down also so that helps.
 
This is probably a ridiculous idea, but if each of your drums had a speaker in it (and there is room for that), than that would be a real evolution in electronic drums...where the sound actually comes out of the drums! This is the only way to me that they could actually start to approach real drums. What are you going to use for your personal sound reinforcement?
They tried that already (with the bass drum at least- see 5.03) and it didn't exactly set the e-drum world on fire 🤷‍♂️

 
That's a great point! Fortunately (?), we use our own PA system with XAir mixer with configs based on the venue (very few of them), but your point is well-taken. I imagine it will be a bit more involved if we ever decide to gig at a venue with their own sound.
I've been gigging my DTX6 kit for just over 6 months now and the difference in PA abilities to reproduce it has been palpable. One venue we play at regularly has a quite expensive EV foh, but for some reason it really struggles with the toms. First time we played there I just did some basic eq adjustments from the module which was ok but not perfect. Second time there, and with a bit of experimentation at rehearsals, and I'm using sample laying with extra tom sounds with more punch and dryer than I would normally like, but the EV seems to like it and for that particular PA works perfectly.
You don't always get a second chance to experiment and get it right but for that reason I've setup a bunch of presets based on experience of various systems to hopefully have something that sounds good. Issues so far with PAs, other than toms (which for some reason is a common thing, have been; inability to cope with the bass drum, so I layer an 18 dry sample on top of a 22 with resonance, cymbals can be harsh so have a 'washier' set to cope with that, snares fair ok but the rim shots not so much so have a bunch of different ones to suit, and hihat is normally ok sound wise but the volume varies a lot, but that's an easy cure in the mixer section although something to be aware of.
 
This is probably a ridiculous idea, but if each of your drums had a speaker in it (and there is room for that), than that would be a real evolution in electronic drums...where the sound actually comes out of the drums! This is the only way to me that they could actually start to approach real drums. What are you going to use for your personal sound reinforcement?
I use in-ears and a Porter and Davies throne, although I've been using an EV 12" monitor with the ekit in rehearsal lately. May even try that out next gig.
 
They tried that already (with the bass drum at least- see 5.03) and it didn't exactly set the e-drum world on fire 🤷‍♂️

Wow man, I can tell you’ve spent a lot of time thinking about this stuff, and you put an incredible amount of work into that video! You are definitely an authority on all things e-drums
 
This is probably a ridiculous idea, but if each of your drums had a speaker in it (and there is room for that), than that would be a real evolution in electronic drums...where the sound actually comes out of the drums! This is the only way to me that they could actually start to approach real drums. What are you going to use for your personal sound reinforcement?
I think of an Ekit more like an acoustic kit when it's mic'ed up. After all you don't have a speaker per drum when you go through a pa.
 
I think of an Ekit more like an acoustic kit when it's mic'ed up. After all you don't have a speaker per drum when you go through a pa.
It’s not quite the same to me, because you still have the acoustic sound of the drums and cymbals coming back at you
 
I use in-ears and a Porter and Davies throne, although I've been using an EV 12" monitor with the ekit in rehearsal lately. May even try that out next gig.
That’s cool. Something to think about is you can get a KSub for almost the same price as that throne, and you don’t get that weird feeling of your butt vibrating…ha ha!
I’ve been using a Ksub along with a 12” monitor for my acoustic drums for years, and it works great. Since the KSub has casters, it is pretty easy to move around.
https://www.guitarcenter.com/QSC/KS...-Q2cPV9ZlUvc8hgBskFTwNHnly7MCdbBoC6xgQAvD_BwE
 
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