Electronic drumset for a beginner

BlackToothGrin

New member
Do you guys have any suggestions on edrums in the 500-800$ price range. I'm in the market for a first drumset and i've been looking for a set with all mesh pads. I have played the electric guitar for about three years now and I play mainly metal, so a double bass-compatible drum tower would be nice aswell.
 

electrodrummer

Senior Member
YOU need to go and hits things. Buy what you like :) Mesh is not the be-all-and-end-all - it has its issues (bouncy / hotspots).

Get 2nd user if you can - you'll get more for your money (we have a saying - buy your second kit first!) Look at Roland or Yamaha. Avoid generic Chinese kits.
 

BlackToothGrin

New member
YOU need to go and hits things. Buy what you like :) Mesh is not the be-all-and-end-all - it has its issues (bouncy / hotspots).

Get 2nd user if you can - you'll get more for your money (we have a saying - buy your second kit first!) Look at Roland or Yamaha. Avoid generic Chinese kits.
I've found a few used kits online. Are 5 year old drum modules outdated? My fear is that i find a few year old kit for half the price and in a couple of years that kit is useless because the lack of sounds and so on...
 

electrodrummer

Senior Member
I've found a few used kits online. Are 5 year old drum modules outdated? My fear is that i find a few year old kit for half the price and in a couple of years that kit is useless because the lack of sounds and so on...
Outdated? No! (acoustic drummers love 50-year old stuff!). I often gig with 20+ year old electronic stuff. No complaints.

Lack of sounds? Not really applicable if you like the stock sounds and/or get something like a Yamaha DTX5x2 series and you can load you own sounds into it. You can always plug into a PC and run software sound generators as well. (again - let's face it - acoustic drummers use one set of sounds for everything!!)
 

KamaK

Platinum Member
Do you guys have any suggestions on edrums in the 500-800$ price range. I'm in the market for a first drumset and i've been looking for a set with all mesh pads. I have played the electric guitar for about three years now and I play mainly metal, so a double bass-compatible drum tower would be nice aswell.

When I was looking for an e-kit to practice on, I had the following requirements..

I wanted to spend ~$500
I wanted a reliable vendor (Yamaha or Roland)
I wanted AT LEAST one mesh/silicon/good/not-hard-rubber pad
I wanted a real BD pedal and not a piano pedal
I wanted a real HH stand and not a piano pedal.

Unfortunately, a kit did not exist in my price range and I ended up having to more-than double my budget for A Yamaha DTX-532.... Which, coincidently, I now have for sale for $500 on CL.
 

Mr_Runner

Well-known member
Hi like above if you know of any shops (or find them) that have kits and possibly different makes on display see if you can try them out and maybe try to get some good advice if there's someone you can find like that at a shop like this. One thing though electric drumming is a very expensive business and you'll see that if you look into any Roland / Yamaha stuff. Yeah it's meant and I hope is better quality and could hopefully last significantly longer than some other makes but you'll pay for it alright. I bought a Roland recently (my second kit) and found out just how expensive Roland / Yamaha is. My first kit and in my opinion a very good first kit generally speaking and very good value for money again in my opinion was my KAT KT2. I think it cost me about £600 brand new. Not sure if it could accommodate a double bass though? Rubber pads though as I think you were after mesh. My new Roland has mesh and I also tried out the Yamaha silicone pads and all seemed ok although mesh and silicone seemed better than rubber with more 'give' but I think mesh is the best from what I've seen so far and in my opinion.

One guy along with some people here on the forum helped me out quite a bit;


He seems an alright guy, seems to have been into electric drumming for some time but has a lot of videos on his channel nearly all electric drumming related. He's covered a lot of different stuff in his videos and also tried quite a lot of kits and equipment out and documented them with his opinions and features of the stuff. I found some of his videos very useful in particular when it came to buying a kit / or your first kit. Yes it takes a bit to get through it but in my opinion it was reasonably good stuff and I found myself agreeing with quite a lot of what he was saying. His name is Justin I think and he just seemed like a reasonably honest and straight up guy. Shops can be good for trying stuff out but I think you need some back up like this just incase someone working at a shop advises you but not in your best interests necessarily as at the end of the day they're there to sell and make money. A good person at a shop will be like this but also will look at your circumstances and needs etc to give you the best advice. Not all of them are like that though or even good enough possibly. My guess is Justin will probably have covered a lot of things that you're trying to find out.

He advises on second hand stuff as well. A good few people say second hand Roland / Yamaha stuff is good and probably for the most part they could be correct as it's supposed to be better quality stuff that lasts longer. I myself wasn't totally convinced as I see it as electronic stuff which in my opinion hasn't always been great second hand. Any electric equipment can fail and nothing is indestructible no matter what make / brand it is. I just hope that the Roland / Yamaha stuff just lasts longer and significantly I'm hoping generally speaking. You'll pay though but sometimes you get what you pay for / or get something that does or doesn't do the job well. Sometimes it's either pay now or pay more later. Not only that but I've heard Roland / Yamaha can keep its value quite well in the second hand market so I don't know how much you'd get off (from new price) unless you got a really good deal which probably isn't going to be that common. I heard Roland was very good second hand but then on Ebay I saw second hand Roland modules that had LCD problems I think and I don't even know how old the stuff was. It maybe a case of knowing which versions are the better ones for second hand but that can either take quite a lot of experience or research but perhaps you could find that out sooner than this if you needed to. I've also heard about several different faults with several different models of Roland cymbals which again are meant to be good quality and therefore should hopefully last longer relative to type of use. Also with anything second hand you don't know what someone has been doing with the stuff or treating it differently to how you would perhaps. Some people can be less than honest when selling their stuff and a lot of second hand stuff can have very little if any warranty and you seem to need to be more 'lucky' here although research and experience can sometimes increase that unless you were lucky anyway and more fortunate which could be rarer here.

In the end though you may have to spend more than your budget to get something reasonably good. I got what I needed but in the end I spent far far more than I wanted to. In the end it was that or nothing. This seems to be the case with a lot of stuff in life and especially electric drumming. However it's your first kit so this might not come into play quite as much. If you carry on your requirements may change, increase etc in time and that's when you may need to spend more money and in my case a hell of a lot more money for your needs to be met let alone what you want.

In terms of stuff becoming cheaper in time that can happen with a lot of stuff. You can try to consider the future in terms of what you may need something to do etc to keep your options open but you also need to consider your needs at present. If you carry on your needs etc can change and some of those future needs can essentially be impossible to predict especially if you're starting out. You can try but it seems to be all part of experience, learning curve etc. Again the '65 Drums' link covers some of this stuff in terms of upgrades and getting another kit but that's one thing I may have disagreed with on the channel and what Justin was saying about the possibility of upgrading parts of a kit - upgrades seem to be even more expensive at least in terms of buying new sometimes to the point where you may as well buy a new kit which can be the case with other stuff, spare parts, repairs. Again the second hand market can come in here but I've stated my general opinion on that and another thing I may have at least partly disagreed with on the channel. I agreed with a good bit of the stuff on the channel but disagreed with a few things but not a lot. Sometimes as you gain more knowledge and experience with stuff you can disagree perhaps a bit more due to your own and direct experience being different but generally speaking I thought the channel along with this forum was a really good starting point. The VDrums forum might be ok as well.

Check out the link above, it covers lot of stuff and some of the above.

I don't know I think sometimes you need to invest and put your hand in your pocket (if you can) especially if you're more serious about something and have some experience. Not that many people seem to want to do this even if they have the funds and may have different financial priorities even if it's alcohol etc. Usually if you go cheap, that's exactly what you'll get (with the possibility of it not being up to the job and what you need it to do well) and even more so with electric drumming unfortunately. Ironically by going cheap in the first instance you can actually end up paying more in the long run than if you made a better first choice and spent more. Justin also covers this in one of his videos (surprise surprise) and it displays this situation and principle well as an example. It was a vid about building your own kit I think and buying all the parts separately with it saying it can start out cheaply but in the end could work out way more than if you just bought a full kit. If you genuinely can't afford something ok, see if you can save up, even if it takes a bit and maybe use something else temporarily if you can. Not sure about other countries but in the Uk I got my kit 0% interest free over 2 years I guess as long as the monthly payments are manageable. I also got a 3 year warranty. With second hand you'll probably get neither (sometimes a 3 month warranty if bought from a shop at least in the Uk) and cough up a good wedge (and up front) anyway at best.
 
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