Electronic drums for practicing

kds

Member
Looking for guidance about a quality electronic kit I can use for practicing (headphones and Bluetooth capability) and easily transfer over to an acoustic for performing. Thanks.
 

No Way Jose

Silver Member
Personally I did not like it. I sold my electronic drum kit.
 
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Tiges

Well-known Member
Not much to know, about them there all basically the same,the internet has many, for sale with heaps of info, personally I do not like them,Good luck.
 
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Bo Eder

Platinum Member
Looking for guidance about a quality electronic kit I can use for practicing (headphones and Bluetooth capability) and easily transfer over to an acoustic for performing. Thanks.
People always argue this with me because “at lest you’re playing on something”, but I don’t think it works out well. If your end goal is to be playing acoustic drums and cymbals, then you’re better off practicing on those. Triggering a perfect sound and “producing” a perfect sound are two very different things, and electronic pads do not help you. But I do get you don’t want to bother anyone.

I would suggest getting with neighbors and family members and coming up with a time when everyone understands you’ll be playing and they’re ok with that. If that means hosting a bbq with your neighbors, then it couldn’t hurt to have more people with you then against you.
Or is your goal to be playing electronic drums on a gig?
 

Square

Active Member
People always argue this with me because “at lest you’re playing on something”, but I don’t think it works out well. If your end goal is to be playing acoustic drums and cymbals, then you’re better off practicing on those. Triggering a perfect sound and “producing” a perfect sound are two very different things, and electronic pads do not help you. But I do get you don’t want to bother anyone.

I would suggest getting with neighbors and family members and coming up with a time when everyone understands you’ll be playing and they’re ok with that. If that means hosting a bbq with your neighbors, then it couldn’t hurt to have more people with you then against you.
Or is your goal to be playing electronic drums on a gig?

I can see your point on triggering vs producing. I can also say, I see this clearly when I move from electronic to acoustic kits. With that stipulated, I will say that there are other areas of benefit.

For me, at this point in my journey, mechanics are my main focus. I'm not talking about the mechanics of producing a perfect sound. I'm talking about the mechanics of applying a fill to a groove, or building a groove or working on timing across a variety of situations. For this, an electronic kit has been a godsend. I can work much of the day, and night without disturbing those with whom I share a home.

I get it. I see it. Moving the application to the acoustic set requires I revisit what I've learned and look for a bit more nuance in my playing.

I work evenings, the wife works days, and I have two college students in the house with a mix of on/off line things happening. Getting a large block of time on the acoustic kit, consistently, is just not in the cards for me.

To that point, I have a Roland TD-17KVX which has the features the OP is looking for. Sounds are not great, but tolerable. Otherwise, I have no complaints.
 

brentcn

Platinum Member
Looking for guidance about a quality electronic kit I can use for practicing (headphones and Bluetooth capability) and easily transfer over to an acoustic for performing. Thanks.
Such a kit does not exist. The "easily transfer" thing is the issue. However, e-kits with mesh heads feel much more realistic than solid rubber pads. This also raises the price, of course. Ddrum now makes a "hybrid" kit (they're selling the electronic interface separately).

So many things go wrong when self-instructing on an e-kit. The positioning of the pads and cymbals doesn't reflect an acoustic kit's ergonomics (or lack thereof). A bass drum pedal technique that works well for an e-kit often winds up useless. The balance of sounds necessary to make an acoustic kit sound good, can't be learned on an e-kit, because the electronics are too forgiving of uneven dynamics. In particular, the volume and tone coming from the snare and bass drums, relative to the hi-hat and ride cymbals, will be way off.

However, you can avoid many of these pitfalls on an e-kit if you have personal, private instruction. A good teacher will display technique and positioning you can copy, and steer you away from techniques that are sure to cause problems later. An absolute must is a practice pad with good rebound (Evans RealFeel is my go-to here), to get your hand technique off to solid start. No cutting corners there.

Historically, my students with an e-kit at home for practice usually ditch it within a year or two, if their goal is to play live with other people. I often recommend buying an acoustic kit and muffling it down with things that can be quickly removed for the occasional loud practice session.
 

Macarina

Silver Member
Simply put, if you are confined to loudness issues, than an e-kit is your best choice.
I’ve had an e-kit going on 10 years and have adapted to their setup and feel. While I wouldn’t mind also having a small acoustic set, I could not practice at home if it were not for the e-kit.

I don’t think any sets have Bluetooth. I use a Good set of headphones.
 
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pccoder

Member
Looking for guidance about a quality electronic kit I can use for practicing (headphones and Bluetooth capability) and easily transfer over to an acoustic for performing. Thanks.
There is absolutely nothing wrong with practicing on e-drums and then playing on acoustic. It's so annoying to hear when people say that is problematic. All my in-person lessons have been with an acoustic kit, and I have an e-kit at home (which is all I play). If there was no simple transition from one to the other e-drums wouldn't even exist.

I don't know anything about an e-kit module supporting bluetooth. Just plug in some nice in-ear monitors and you should be fine.
 

electrodrummer

Senior Member
Looking for guidance about a quality electronic kit I can use for practicing (headphones and Bluetooth capability) and easily transfer over to an acoustic for performing. Thanks.

(Bluetooth is not necessary!)

Anyways:

Stock what kit post:

Few questions:

1. Budget?
2. What have you played and enjoyed?
3. What features are you interested in?
4. Where are you?
5. ....and... budget :) ;)


And things to consider...

• Hit some things. Buy what YOU like the FEEL of.
• Hit some things. Buy what YOU like the SOUND of.
• Download and read the manuals of anything you're interested in to get a grip on usability and features.
• Avoid proprietary cable snakes.
• Look for expansion flexibility
• Look for MIDI note layering and switching and zero limits on what note or channel can be used on the kit.
• Look for multi-zoned pads (pref 3-zone snare as a minimum)
• Avoid cheapo Medeli-badged stuff (most would suggest Yamaha / Roland for proven reliability and support)
• Get 2nd user for more for your money.

Now - go and test-drive - and remember electronic drums are not acoustic drums :)
 

harryconway

Platinum Member
Looking for guidance about a quality electronic kit I can use for practicing (headphones and Bluetooth capability) and easily transfer over to an acoustic for performing. Thanks.
First - electrodrummer knows his stuff. See above.

Yes ..... there ARE kits with Bluetooth. Roland TD-17KV is one. Heres a video rundown of that kit ..... and I would reccomend this guys channel (65 drums) if you want info on e-drums. He covers a lot. From dedicated e-kits, to acoustic/electric conversions ..... and everything in between.

 

yammyfan

Senior Member
Glancing at some of the other replies, I see that others have the same thoughts and experience that I do. Playing electronic drums is just barely adequate as a substitute and in the end they will stunt your growth as a drummer. Do what you must but get away from them as soon as possible.
 
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C.M. Jones

Diamond Member
I've never played an electronic kit I've liked. Both the sound and feel (especially the latter) are all wrong to me. I understand the appeal of electronic kits for quiet practice, but if confronted with decibel-containment concerns, I'd rather place mutes on acoustic drums than fool about with simulated devices. There's just no substitute for genuine shells and bronze cymbals in my book.
 

pccoder

Member
I've never played an electronic kit I've liked. Both the sound and feel (especially the latter) are all wrong to me. I understand the appeal of electronic kits for quiet practice, but if confronted with decibel-containment concerns, I'd rather place mutes on acoustic drums than fool about with simulated devices. There's just no substitute for genuine shells and bronze cymbals in my book.
Also, e-drums have helped maintain my marital status. ;)
 

C.M. Jones

Diamond Member
Also, e-drums have helped maintain my marital status. ;)
Less expensive than court settlements, I guess. :D

Fortunately, my wife has never complained about my drumming. She has a musical background too, so we've always been on excellent terms with regard to sound waves.
 
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dboomer

Senior Member
They work fine for me. I don’t particularly like the way they look but I would prefer to play a high quality electronic kit if I were playing rock gigs, not so much for jazz.

I would stay away from bluetooth to headphones. Too much latency.
 
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