Electric VS acoustic drum feel.

Sausagetoad

Active Member
It's strange. In some ways, electric kits are 'da bomb' because they respond quickly like practice pads. The larger toms are not as 'loose.' But inasmuch as they are quick with stick response, they lag a bit electronically. And are not as dynamic, especially snares. They never really get it right with the snare, it stumbles a bit in a closed roll. I have a Roland TD-17 and ATV pads, so it's not low-grade stuff. The kicks are cool because real ones are hard to get right, but the snares don't cut like real ones.
 
Here we go again... ;)
  1. Electronic kits are "real". My synths are real. My Strat is real.

  2. Electronic kits are NOT acoustic kits. Completely different instrument. A Korg synth is not a Steinway grand. They share a similar input interface, but that's it. The former can do so much more - and you don't buy a synth for a few K and only use the piano preset and never touch the mod wheels etc. Don't limit yourself to only sounding like it's 1958. Or your playing techniques to the same period.
Embrance the ekit like your keyboard player embraces the Korg MS10 and doesn't complain that it doesn't feel or sound the same as their grandma's upright piano.

vince_clarke_piano.fw.png
 
I like the drums on most kits & on higher end kits I think that the mesh heads & responsiveness are OK.

But, even on a top end electronic kit, for me the cymbals are not there yet. Especially the hi-hats which are still a fairly weak imitation.

The plus side of this is that I can browse Drummers World looking at all the sparkly kits & venues etc. & fantasise about having a practice space where I'd be able to play to my hearts content without upsetting neighbours, playing on whatever acoustic kit is what I imagine in that fabled room...
One day... One day. Please!

In the meantime I'll put up with my rubber kit! "Almost like the real thing" ;-)
 
I like the drums on most kits & on higher end kits I think that the mesh heads & responsiveness are OK.

But, even on a top end electronic kit, for me the cymbals are not there yet. Especially the hi-hats which are still a fairly weak imitation.

The plus side of this is that I can browse Drummers World looking at all the sparkly kits & venues etc. & fantasise about having a practice space where I'd be able to play to my hearts content without upsetting neighbours, playing on whatever acoustic kit is what I imagine in that fabled room...
One day... One day. Please!

In the meantime I'll put up with my rubber kit! "Almost like the real thing" ;-)
You're right about the hi-hats. Gotta use real ones. I can live with the crash cymbals, mine are chokeable. Ride cymbal, meh....Ideally, or to play live, one would need to use a real snare, hats, & cymbals. The toms and kicks are quite doable....
 
if You want the massive dynamic range and feel of an acoustic kit then use an acoustic kit, if you want the consistency and ability to experiment then use an e-kit or triggered samples. I saw Bill Bruford give a demo of Simmons SDX a long time ago and really nothing has changed in twenty or more years.
 
Here we go again... ;)
  1. Electronic kits are "real". My synths are real. My Strat is real.

  2. Electronic kits are NOT acoustic kits. Completely different instrument. A Korg synth is not a Steinway grand. They share a similar input interface, but that's it. The former can do so much more - and you don't buy a synth for a few K and only use the piano preset and never touch the mod wheels etc. Don't limit yourself to only sounding like it's 1958. Or your playing techniques to the same period.
Embrance the ekit like your keyboard player embraces the Korg MS10 and doesn't complain that it doesn't feel or sound the same as their grandma's upright piano.

View attachment 136040
Here we go again. There's a huge group of drummers looking to get electronic drums as a substitute for acoustic drums for various legitimate reasons. And contrary to your point, there are many electronic drums/VST setups that have the goal of mimicking the sound and feel of an acoustic kit, just like there are many electronic pianos that have the goal of mimicking an acoustic piano.

I understand what you're saying about them being different instruments but it's not helpful trying to beat your opinion into the heads of drummers who have completely different (and equally legitimate) priorities from you. Saying this because I've seen you comment the exact thing on another thread.
 
It's strange. In some ways, electric kits are 'da bomb' because they respond quickly like practice pads. The larger toms are not as 'loose.' But inasmuch as they are quick with stick response, they lag a bit electronically. And are not as dynamic, especially snares. They never really get it right with the snare, it stumbles a bit in a closed roll. I have a Roland TD-17 and ATV pads, so it's not low-grade stuff. The kicks are cool because real ones are hard to get right, but the snares don't cut like real ones.
I know they're more money and you've probably already shelled out a lot, but I find the VST route provides a more "real" playing experience. It's hard to describe but the way the pads respond with those sounds makes it play more like an acoustic. EZ drummer 3 has a free trial if you're interested in trying.

Still not perfect, but better than what came stock on my efnote imo.
 
You mean the TD-20? It was probably the KD-120 (never actually tried this one but looks like a solid pad).

View attachment 136607
I like my ATV 13" kick pad, it's very responsive. I wish that they'd all put a slight curvature on the bit where the pedal mounts, like a rim, because pedals are made that way, they don't like flat surfaces. But all electric kits do the same thing with that. 1689201194158.png
 
I like my ATV 13" kick pad, it's very responsive. I wish that they'd all put a slight curvature on the bit where the pedal mounts, like a rim, because pedals are made that way, they don't like flat surfaces. But all electric kits do the same thing with that. View attachment 136608
How do the ATV's feel to play - pretty much the same as Roland's?

And yes, it is annoying they don't give much space to mount the pedal (which is why I went for the KD140).
 
How do the ATV's feel to play - pretty much the same as Roland's?

And yes, it is annoying they don't give much space to mount the pedal (which is why I went for the KD140).
Yes, pretty much the same. They were invented by the same guy that invented Roland VDrums. Except with the ATV's you get a kit with larger pad sizes for much less money. If you use a Roland module, there's very little perceivable difference. I like the ATV module for cymbals, but you can't muffle the drums, they ring for days, so I prefer the Roland module for the drums. I run 2 modules.
 
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