e-drum kit for heel-toe double-kick

Nongus

New member
I'm an experienced player who has used lockdown to finally get my aching legs in shape to play heel-toe double-kick at speed. I've spent an unholy amount of time with my direct drive pedals on a practise pad and its working out nicely. I play a lot of heavy music so its been fun developing this technique.

Anyway - I'm looking to get my first electronic kit. I don't want to spend super crazy money but I'm not looking for entry level either. Specifically, I want to be able to hear the heel-toe results effectively, so:
1. It would be good to have the option of pressure sensitive as well as 'triggered' output
2. Something hardy enough with a realistic bounce to withstand the rigours of metal.

So, please - recommendations, dos and donts...? Can anyone recommend a kit or two?
 

electrodrummer

Senior Member
Standard "what kit" post:

1. Budget?
2. Budget?
3. What have you played and enjoyed?
4. What features are you interested in?
5. Where are you?
6. ....and... budget :) ;)

To which I'll add...
  • Download and read the manuals of anything you're interested in to get a grip on usability and features.
  • Hit some things. Buy what YOU like the feel of.
  • Look for expansion flexibility
  • Look for MIDI note layering and switching and zero limits on what note or channel can be used on the kit.
  • Look for multi-zoned pads (pref 3-zone snare as a minimum)
  • Avoid proprietary cable snakes.
  • Avoid cheapo Medeli-badged stuff.
  • Get 2nd user for more for your money.
No - go and test-drive :)

---

(all this won't stop people shouting out specific kit models, even though they don't know your budget ;) 3:) )
 

Nongus

New member
Standard "what kit" post:

1. Budget?
2. Budget?
3. What have you played and enjoyed?
4. What features are you interested in?
5. Where are you?
6. ....and... budget :) ;)

To which I'll add...
  • Download and read the manuals of anything you're interested in to get a grip on usability and features.
  • Hit some things. Buy what YOU like the feel of.
  • Look for expansion flexibility
  • Look for MIDI note layering and switching and zero limits on what note or channel can be used on the kit.
  • Look for multi-zoned pads (pref 3-zone snare as a minimum)
  • Avoid proprietary cable snakes.
  • Avoid cheapo Medeli-badged stuff.
  • Get 2nd user for more for your money.
No - go and test-drive :)

---

(all this won't stop people shouting out specific kit models, even though they don't know your budget ;) 3:) )

Thanks for that - I don't mind being spammed with suggestions
budget - £400-£1000.
 

electrodrummer

Senior Member
Thanks for that - I don't mind being spammed with suggestions
budget - £400-£1000.
Cool (that's a heck of a range!) - so what have you actually tried? What features you want? (Looks like you're in the UK "£" - where are you? )

As for your questions:

1. It would be good to have the option of pressure sensitive as well as 'triggered' output
- kicks use a piezo pickup. It'll detect velocity - usually translated on a scale of 1-127. Most modules let you change the sensitively and velocity curve.

2. Something hardy enough with a realistic bounce to withstand the rigours of metal.
- "realistic" - edrums are "real". Not acoustic, though. If you want something to emulate an acoustic - use an acoustic kick. As far as edrum kick pads are concerned, and "feel" - YOU need to try some out as this will be a very personal decision. Rubber vs silicone vs mesh, vs (etc)
If you want "hardy" - then avoid Alesis and Medeli badged stuff (Fame, Carlsboro, Millennium, TourTech ete ). Stick with Yamaha or Roland.
 
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lefty2

Platinum Member
I have an inexpensive Alisis nitro kit (not mesh) and it does not do well with a double pedal. It works great with a single pedal but it doesn’t pick up the double pedal because it’s not striking the center of the pad.
 
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