Dying for help!

Pocket-full-of-gold

Platinum Member
But if OP really wants someone to tune the drums properly for him, it's an option to consider. Sounds like he's pretty frustrated (I've been there).
I'll do it.......for $75.......and I'll be back in a week or two when they need tuning again.......for another $75, naturally.

Of course he could also pay someone $75 as a one off for them to teach him how to do it too. FWIW, I'm up for that lesson as well.
But I still reckon a guy in a drum store will show him the process for nothing anyway. :)
 

MattA

Senior Member
One of the greatest tips I can give is to use two tuning keys at once.

When you're tensioning one rod, use the second key on the opposite rod.

I've found it produces a much more even and consistent tuning across the drum.
 

Ryan_Coke

Member
Jimmy, thanks for that. Will look into it.
Matt funny how you mention tightening 2 at a time. Tried it tonight and worked MUCH better. Thx guys
 

JBoom

Senior Member
I just want to say that this thread offers some great advise, and I'm mostly posting to keep it going!

I would chime in on some key points:

* Learning to tune IS frustrating and can take as long as that complicated Buddy Rich tune you want to play note for note. It takes practice.

* Tune-bot should have been invented years ago! It brings science to what was once only an art. But you do have to learn to use that as well (it doesn't just do the work for you, and it has a few quirks you have to get used to, like picking up on unwanted overtones).

* Acoustics matter. Your drums will never sound live that way any drums sound recorded. So, if you're used to e-drums, you may never be satisfied with live acoustic drums (especially in a room without any acoustic dampening on the walls).

* I've found that using studio headphones while playing can cut out enough of the room's overtones that you can appreciate a good tuning. (please note that studio headphones are not appropriate ear protection, and appropriate ear protection can work just as good but do not to my taste, as they cut out too much of the sound).

*Also, if you lack proper acoustic dampening or the funds to add them to a room, old mattresses propped up around the walls can work quite well if you're on a low budget (old mattresses can often be obtained for free).
 
Top