dw tuning problems

Unix

Silver Member
Ive heard that some people have had trouble with their dee dubs anybody got any info

I never heard that DW shell where worse then other to tune.
Stop asking everyone about everything, go in a store and try some kits, make your own choice and get one.

People can give you some leads, but they can't tell you what sound good in your own hear and what it is made to be played for you.
 
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Drewbrew

Member
I never heard that DW shell where worse then other to tune.
Stop asking everyone about everything, go in a store and try some kits, make your own choice and get one.

People can give you some leads, but they can't tell you what sound good in your own hear and what it is made to be played for you.
Well I'm sorry sir but I dont live near a music store that has a dw drum set set up to play. Even the local guitar center doesnt have one set up. And believe me I've tried
 

bobdadruma

Platinum Member
There are numerous threads and posts about different manufacturers drums. If you search this site you will learn about the different shell and wood types. You will learn about how head selection is also an important factor in drum sound.
You still have to go and try as many different drum configurations that you can until you know what you want. Only then can you make a decision about the drums that you want to buy.
One of the best sounding kits that I have ever heard was a beat up Pearl Export! I even like my Pearl Rhythm Traveler. I also like expensive kits. I like my vintage Gretsch kit.
I have played many drums and head configurations over the years. I find something that I like and dislike about all of them. There is no Perfect Drum and head set up!
Plan some trips to different stores and play different drums. Play as many other drummers kits that you can and ask the owners questions about their kits.
As you gain experience with different sounding drums you will eventually learn what you like and want. When you find something that you like, You will know it! It will work for you!
I have never seen any drum that couldn't be made to sound good.
Remember, Drums are what you make them! You experiment with head selection and tunings until you like what you hear. I have known drummers that have kits that are made up of drums from three different kits. They find a drum that they like and they add it to their kit. Some drummers refinish their drum shells on these kits so that their drums match. Some don't! Some use a different head configuration on different drums on their kit.
 
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Les Ismore

Platinum Member
Ive heard that some people have had trouble with their dee dubs anybody got any info
DW's tune up fine. To hold tuning DW now has what's called 'True Pitch' tension rods.

Standard tension rods are 12/24 the 24 being 24 (tpi) threads per inch. True Pitch is 30 threads per inch, a fine(er) thread. 30 tpi means more turns on the key/finer tuning and (theoretically) more resistance to loosening from vibration.

Don't go out and buy DW True Pitch for those reasons, b/c they won't fit your lug-nuts (unless you have the correct DW's).

Any drum, including ones with tube lugs can be cured of detuning with the purchase of
'Tight Screws' (pic ☟). These are tension rods that have a channel cut in them, a nylon strip is inserted into the channel. The strip extends up above the threads and fills the receiving threads completely.

Yamaha solved detuning years ago with a nylon insert in their lugs, same principle as you see on tight screw, only on the receiving threads.
 
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Steady Freddy

Pioneer Member
I own two DW kits, a Yamaha MCAN, and a Ludwig Classic Maple. I also own six DW snares and have had several others.

I have straight shells on the Luddies and Yammies and re-rings on the dubs.I don't have any trouble getting the dubs to tune up. I've had them cranked up, tuned low, and everywhere in between. They always sound great.

I've used clear, coated, single ply, and two ply heads from Evans, Remo, and Aquarian.

The drums have always sounded great. My favorite heads are coated G2s over clear G1s on my Collectors kit, and Clear G plus over clear G1s on my VLT kit. Other combos have worked out well also. I use a EQ1 or EQ3 on the bass batter and an EMAD reso.

Snare heads are mostly Ambassadors over Hazy Ambasadors or Hazy Diplomats.

Clearly not everyone likes DWs and that's cool, but I love em. I haven't had any issues at all with them. My Yammies and Ludwigs are cased and stacked. I just seem to play the dubs all the time.

HTH
 

RobertM

Platinum Member
Drew:

To go along with what Francois (Unix) and Les and others have said, I haven't heard of DW Collectors shells having problems worse than anyone else--Tama, Yamaha, Sonor, etc. Yamaha uses the nylon insert, as noted by Les, and Sonor has a special tuning rod to address potential detuning issues, and Tama uses special "Hold-Tight" washers to stabilize the tuning screws.

I used to own a DW Collectors kit. The only "problem" I had with it was, to my subjective ear, the tuning range of the DW shell was somewhat limited. My DWs sounded great and held tuning quite well, but they did not sound good to my ears when tuned high for bebop/jazz, but that's just me. Otherwise, my DWs sounded great, and I even received compliments from audience members and sound engineers about their sound.

A drum professional friend of mine used to play DW years ago (c. 2000), and he didn't like his DW Collectors because of detuning issues. However, he played heavy grunge rock (e.g., Sevendust, later/slower Corrosion of Conformity) and liked to tune his heads very low (meaning loose) to get more of that darker, heavier, growling register out of his toms and floor toms. He noticed that he had to retune his toms frequently and tired of this, so he switched to Pork Pie and has never looked back. Now, that is still just a single subjective player's response. If DW really had significant tuning issues, I don't think you would see heavy rock players or high-profile drummers like Neil Peart using their kits. No amount of paid endorser luring would work if your product is that flawed.

Francois is right: you just need to wade through what sound makes you happiest. If you think that you might find yourself longing for a different drum kit months or years down the road--which, given your waivering from your various posts, sounds like might happen--then getting a DW would be a good investment, like Unix recommended. And it is no insult regarding your waivering--I don't think Unix meant to insult you at all by recommending DW. Many of us waiver constantly about what we want out of drums, and that is totally normal in my book. It takes time, experience, and sorting through your own personal tastes to tease out what you really want, and given the cost of drums, you really want to make sure because it is no small amount of money. You will get good resale value out of a DW kit and be able to reinvest the money in another kit. If you go custom, like with a Tempus Fiberglass kit or Pork Pie or GMS, etc., etc., you will lose more on your investment if you go to resell versus if you are selling a DW Collectors or Yamaha Recording Custom, etc. Investing in a high quality custom kit like a Unix stave or Brady ply shell Jarrah, on the other hand and to my mind, is more about really customizing a sound to your ears. Especially when it comes to Unix's work, you are investing in a personal builder's unique art--it is not, I would hope, something any of us would want or have to part with sometime down the road.
 
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RobertM

Platinum Member
I own two DW kits, a Yamaha MCAN, and a Ludwig Classic Maple. I also own six DW snares and have had several others.

I have straight shells on the Luddies and Yammies and re-rings on the dubs.I don't have any trouble getting the dubs to tune up. I've had them cranked up, tuned low, and everywhere in between. They always sound great.

I've used clear, coated, single ply, and two ply heads from Evans, Remo, and Aquarian.

The drums have always sounded great. My favorite heads are coated G2s over clear G1s on my Collectors kit, and Clear G plus over clear G1s on my VLT kit. Other combos have worked out well also. I use a EQ1 or EQ3 on the bass batter and an EMAD reso.

Snare heads are mostly Ambassadors over Hazy Ambasadors or Hazy Diplomats.

Clearly not everyone likes DWs and that's cool, but I love em. I haven't had any issues at all with them. My Yammies and Ludwigs are cased and stacked. I just seem to play the dubs all the time.

HTH
Freddy,

Don't tell Aydee your MCANs sit in your cases!
 
W

wy yung

Guest
Drew:

To go along with what Francois (Unix) and Les and others have said, I haven't heard of DW Collectors shells having problems worse than anyone else--Tama, Yamaha, Sonor, etc. .
Really? Work in a drum store. DW cannot seem to cut a decent bearing edge. The best DW drums I ever heard were the Keller shells. I do not rate DW drums ate all. And I work at a shop that sells them!

Horrible drums. They just have a great advertising dept.

(not for long though. I am moving)
 

TTNW

Pioneer Member
Stop asking everyone about everything, go in a store and try some kits, make your own choice and get one.

People can give you some leads, but they can't tell you what sound good in your own hear and what it is made to be played for you.

Hey dude, I think some of us would like you to search some of the previous threads. Nobody wants to squelch your interest but you throw a lot of questions out without taking the time to read what's been discussed before.

Otherwise, it's cool. You should know by now that DWs as well as any set of drums are only as good as the drummer that tunes them, puts decent heads on them and makes them sound "good to them".

My sons set of shitty CBs sound better than than a set of DWs at Guitar Center that just arrived without any thoughtful tuning.
 

Steady Freddy

Pioneer Member
Freddy,

Don't tell Aydee your MCANs sit in your cases!
LOL!! Wouldn't dream of it, The MCANs are great drums. My dubs have 12 and 14 inch rack toms and the Yammies are 8, 10, 12. I just like the bigger sizes.

Of the four kits I own the Yammie kick rules. One of these days I'll find a 14 inch MCAN rack tom and then we'll see what's up.

Sound is just so subjective. You find a sound that you like, and then you go with that for a while. If and when your tastes change, you go with something else.

You don't have to marry the friggin things.
 
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