DW Machined vs. Trick Pro 1V Bigfoot

jginalbany

Senior Member
Sorry to take up space with such a subjective question, but given the cost of these pedals, I was hoping for a little input/feedback, etc.

I realize that both pedals are very expensive and that the cost won't help me play better. Nonetheless, I'm intrigued by the features offered by each and given that this is my first double-pedal (played/borrowed others, but not owned) and my only hobby, I thought I'd take the plunge.

I'm looking at used versions of each pedal with the most notable difference seeming to be the spring system for each (Trick=compression; DW=expansion). I don't have a chance to try either, but I can return them if I'm not happy. The DW is more expensive, but I'm trying not to dwell on price. Thanks for your time.

Jim
 

dzarren

Senior Member
i say buy both and return the one you dont want.

The thing with pedals, is that they tend to grow on you. You get used to them over time even if you have trouble with the initially.

Get both if it is within your funds and just return the one you like less.


with direct drive, if you have never played one, is quite different from chain drives, in my experience. Direct drives really produce exactly what you put in, so any slop in your playing will be very apparent.

I find my playing seems much cleaner (on double kick) on my iron cobra double chain pedal. I feel like chain drives seem to "average" out your motions and in general it gets a bit smoother. Direct drives will really force you to clean up your playing.
 

Duck Tape

Platinum Member
As mentioned, direct drive may not be your bag, I would personally stay away from direct drive pedals as I owned a demon drive for 1-2 years and decided to sell it. I know the demon drives will differ from other direct drive pedals but I believe I learned the practical differences between chain and direct drive.

Anyway, ignoring that, I have a dw 9000 and it's a gem of a pedal. I have handled a trick pedal in store (and played one briefly) and they are a serious piece of engineering, I would say more impressive than the dw to behold (not sure about playing). Quality wise you can't go wrong with either but one thing the trick has over the dw is that it has been around longer and refined and the dw is brand new.

Just curious to know, what other pedals did you borrow?

If you are an average drummer who plays some rock or jazz (as in not a speed metal guy or WFD olympian) I would recommend you stay with double chain and regular footboard length. From owning iron cobras, mapex falcons, pearl demon drives, eliminators and dw9000's, that's what I have decided.
 

Tommy_D

Platinum Member
Honestly, I think both are way over engineered and I do not believe anyone needs all these adjustments who's increments are measured in fractions of a millimeter. Both pedals carry a "bling-bling" factor and that's what you are really spending your money on. As you know, neither pedal will make you a better player. In fact, both pedals may end up making you spend more time tinkering with them instead of learning how to play them. So you are effectively making yourself a worse player because you will always blame some sort of pedal adjustment on why you cant play a certain part instead of working on your technique.

I'm not going to convince you that buying a different, more cost effective and simpler, pedal is the way to go, but its been my experience that simpler is better. I love the idea of having all these adjustment options (I have a Pearl Eliminator, Mapex Falcon, and Tama Iron Cobra pedals, so I'm familiar with lots of adjustments), but in the end all of the pedals played exactly like I wanted right out of the box. I tried tinkering with the adjustments, but it just made them feel worse. The only 2 adjustments that I think are necessary on a pedal are spring tension and beater angle. All the other ones are just time wasters.
 

SlitYourDrums

Senior Member
When I tried them, I liked the Trick more.
But if you're able to return one, I'd do that, as someone pointed out pedals do grow on you.
Also, check out the DW 9000, as it is very smooth and it might feel better especially if you come from chain drive.
 

konaboy

Pioneer Member
Have you ever played direct drive pedals before? My experience with Direct Drive is the total opposite of Duct Tape's. I started on a Speed king then went to a DW 5002 chain drive in the late 80's, then the 5002 delta hinge when it came out in the early 90's then to a 9000 when it came out. 5 years ago after reading about the love many have for the Yamaha flying dragon direct drive I decided to give one a go. It was like being home again, I love the feel of direct drive pedals.

Now for the difference between the DW and Trick, the Trick will have a few more adjustments to it. Both are well machined. I've never put my foot on the DW but the Trick pedal seems to feel extremely light. For myself I honestly can't justify the cost of either of these pedals since there are other pedals out there that are just as good at a fraction of the price. If you are set on getting one of these two and you can do like someone suggested get both and return the one you don't like. If not roll the dice and get the one that you think will fit you best, has the adjustment features you want and looks best to you.
 

Trschne

New member
This is a fairly old post I know.. I've tried both, I personally like the feel of DW9Ks with swapped out beaters. I use Tama Iron Cobra rubber beaters. The stock DW beaters are heavy, which is the biggest complaint.. Definitely more speed and lighter feel.. DW makes quality stuff however..
 
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notvinnie

Senior Member
I have tried the DW Machined Chain Drive pedal at NAMM and it felt like the best pedal I've ever set foot upon. Too pricey for me though. I saw Jimmy Branly playing one at the Baked Potato and he seemed to love it (and he endorses Yamaha).

I should also mention that I played the new Pearl P1030 SOLO BLACK at NAMM too, and it felt really, really nice too. Difference being it will only cost a bit over $120!
 

Steady Freddy

Pioneer Member
I have had a Trick Pro IV for over ten years and never got it to feel right. Normally I play DW9000 chain drive. I'm happy with those. The new machined pedals look nice but I doubt I'd see and advantage to them.
 

NackAttack

Well-known member
I’ve had the Trick Pro1-V for a few months and I absolutely love it. It’s surprising how many people say they can’t get them to feel right. I found a setting fairly quick that feels amazing. Hopefully I don’t lose that feeling! The DW MDD looks awesome though.
 

Bo Eder

Platinum Member
I also had the Trick Pro-1v pedal and I initially loved it. But given my experience with pedals and playing, what I discovered I was doing with every pedal I ever owned, was that I was making them feel just like the ancient Camco cam/strap I grew up on. At that point I stopped trying all the newfangled pedals and just stuck with what my foot plays best. I mean, there’s no point in having the $500 pedal if I’m gonna make it feel like a Camco from 1978 that mom and dad bought for $50. That said, I’m now playing a single DW9000 that I love, and I installed the nylon strap instead of the chain. So I basically have the newest and best Camco pedal out there 😉
 

NackAttack

Well-known member
what I discovered I was doing with every pedal I ever owned, was that I was making them feel just like the ancient Camco cam/strap I grew up on.
I’ve heard this more than once as well. It makes sense. I however, don’t have that much experience with a variety of pedals. I had a speed king for about a year, probeat twin pedals for about 5 years and then Iron Cobras for about 16 years. I went straight from that to the Tricks. They feel insanely different. I think I knew going in that it would be a drastic change and there might be some learning curve and “getting used to” so I was pretty open minded as I went through the different adjustments. I loved my ICs but the Tricks feel so much better. If I had bought another chain drive like the dw5 or 9k I could totally see myself subconsciously setting it up to feel like my IC.
 

Bo Eder

Platinum Member
I’ve heard this more than once as well. It makes sense. I however, don’t have that much experience with a variety of pedals. I had a speed king for about a year, probeat twin pedals for about 5 years and then Iron Cobras for about 16 years. I went straight from that to the Tricks. They feel insanely different. I think I knew going in that it would be a drastic change and there might be some learning curve and “getting used to” so I was pretty open minded as I went through the different adjustments. I loved my ICs but the Tricks feel so much better. If I had bought another chain drive like the dw5 or 9k I could totally see myself subconsciously setting it up to feel like my IC.
Yeah, once I became conscious of what I was doing, I stopped looking for the “magic” pedal and committed to the same class of pedals.
 

mitra182

New member
Hey guys, thank god I found this thread, I'm in the same boat right now, for me the Pro-1Vs and DW DD cost the same money here so I'm kinda curious to which one to get. How are your experiences regarding footboard length, because it seems to me that the Trick footboard is substantially longer than the DW.
 

NackAttack

Well-known member
Hey guys, thank god I found this thread, I'm in the same boat right now, for me the Pro-1Vs and DW DD cost the same money here so I'm kinda curious to which one to get. How are your experiences regarding footboard length, because it seems to me that the Trick footboard is substantially longer than the DW.
I don’t have the DW to compare but I would assume the trick is about as long as the DW through the heel-plate.
 
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