DW buys Slingerland!

dwsabianguy

Senior Member
The originals used hide glue, which isn't used as much. Because it's an organic substance, it bonds differently than the glue used today. Nothing made since the 70's if not a tad earlier will have "that" sound.
Does anyone use hide glue to make drum shells anymore? Craviotto, N&C maybe? I've got an acoustic guitar made with hide glue, and I know some string-instrument luthiers use it, and top-of-the-heap Gibsons, but I can't think of any drums off the top of my head.
 

justadrummer

Junior Member
As soon as they announce that they are taking orders, I will place an order for a new Radio King with a silver glass wrap. I own several Radio Kings of various eras, a DW solid shell, a DW/Craviotto, a Super Solid which I ordered the moment they announced them about ten years ago, and one of the new Super Sonic snares. I am clearly their target audience, and I'm happy with that. I trust that they will get this right.
 

Push pull stroke

Platinum Member
As soon as they announce that they are taking orders, I will place an order for a new Radio King with a silver glass wrap. I own several Radio Kings of various eras, a DW solid shell, a DW/Craviotto, a Super Solid which I ordered the moment they announced them about ten years ago, and one of the new Super Sonic snares. I am clearly their target audience, and I'm happy with that. I trust that they will get this right.
Why do people buy steambent single-ply shells for the sound, then muffle that sound with a wrap?
 

justadrummer

Junior Member
Currently I own ten solid maple shelled drums from various manufacturers, three of the ten have wraps. (Two Slingerland Radio Kings and one DW Super Solid.) I'd say that I have more experience with solid maple snare drums than most, and I do not hear a sonic difference. Your mileage may vary.

In any case, I'm the guy spending the money.
 

Push pull stroke

Platinum Member
Currently I own ten solid maple shelled drums from various manufacturers, three of the ten have wraps. (Two Slingerland Radio Kings and one DW Super Solid.) I'd say that I have more experience with solid maple snare drums than most, and I do not hear a sonic difference. Your mileage may vary.

In any case, I'm the guy spending the money.
I know of a guy who took the wrap off an old Blaemire kit, and he noticed a difference in sound. However, spun fiberglass is way more resonant than wood, and those were toms and kick, much deeper and mostly larger diameter than a snare. Therefore, the difference between wrapped versus non-wrapped is probably far more noticeable than on a much shallower and smaller diameter drum like a snare.

I bet a wrap would remove some noticeable amount of resonance on a much deeper snare, especially if it were a very thin shell.
 

paradiddle pete

Platinum Member
That's good , Vintage ones most likely had good glue. I'm talking modern steambent. I have an old Ludwig wrapped steambent, no issues either.
 
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Andy

Administrator
Staff member
Because the wrap doesn't matter. It's the membranes on the cylinders not the plastic around the circumference.
The affect of adding a wrap, or any mass to a shell, is hugely contextual in terms of how that feeds into the characteristics of the finished instrument. In most cases, any difference is inaudible, but in certain specific constructions, it can contribute to a change. In almost all cases, the hardware, by virtue of it's greater mass, offers a much greater influence, but even then, the change in audible delivery is likely more nuance than night & day.

Most players are familiar with the audible difference between a thin shell & a thick shell. The key influencing elements are mass & rigidity. Change either, or both of those elements, and the instrument delivery changes too. Again, the audible change can be small - non existent in many constructions, but in others, it's definitely noticeable.

This old clip, in itself, proves nothing in terms of finished instrument delivery (it was produced just to disprove a statement on pitch change due to mass), but it does give you an idea of the affect of adding a relatively modest amount of mass to a shell.

 

Push pull stroke

Platinum Member
Andy’s post proves my point. I see no reason to cover up nice-looking wood with a wrap, if the shell is designed primarily for sound quality (stave, segment, steambent, etc.). If it’s a thick multi-ply shell, no big deal.
 

justadrummer

Junior Member
Six of my ten single ply solid maple snare drums have some type of transparent maple finish, I like seeing the natural wood as well. My DW/Craviotto is a beautiful flame maple, my Gretsch USA Stanton Moore signature is a stunning Birdseye maple. I love them. I have a 1980s Noble & Cooley solid maple snare that has a red lacquer finish. I bought the drum used in 2009 for three hundred dollars. It sounds amazing, and I didn't care about the finish. On the other hand I have a couple of vintage Slingerlands that are wrapped, they sound terrific and it's nice having such cool drums in a finish to match a kit. I have one of the first DW Super Solid snare drums made, it is finished in their "Broken Glass" finish ply. It's a great match visually with my DW Collector's Series kit or my Gretsch USA Custom kit in silver glass. That particular drum is one of the 3/4" thick versions, it is a beast.

I'm speculating, but I'll bet that many of the new Radio Kings end up being wrapped in the iconic White Marine Pearl finish that was popular on the originals. If everything else is right, I'll bet that they sound a lot like a Radio King.
 

Push pull stroke

Platinum Member
I imagine the DW SS is so thick that the wrap makes no real difference. I’m still unconvinced that the same is true of the Radio Kings, although I doubt that it makes much of a difference.
 

justadrummer

Junior Member
The DW Super Solid was initially available in three shell thicknesses, 3/8", 1/2", and 3/4". I ordered mine in the 3/4" version, mainly out of curiosity. It does have a very different flavor than my other solid shells. I have a natural finish Super Sonic which is essentially a Super Solid with a snare bridge similar to that of a Rogers Dynasonic. My Supersonic is 3/8" thick, about the same as a vintage Radio King. Down the road I may order a Supersonic with a wrap now that you have me curious.
 

Push pull stroke

Platinum Member
The DW Super Solid was initially available in three shell thicknesses, 3/8", 1/2", and 3/4". I ordered mine in the 3/4" version, mainly out of curiosity. It does have a very different flavor than my other solid shells. I have a natural finish Super Sonic which is essentially a Super Solid with a snare bridge similar to that of a Rogers Dynasonic. My Supersonic is 3/8" thick, about the same as a vintage Radio King. Down the road I may order a Supersonic with a wrap now that you have me curious.
I wish DW would make some stave or segment kits/snares. I’m sure they could come up with some really good marketing. I’ve got a stave walnut that I really love. Maybe they could buy Andy’s brand lol
 
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