DW 9000 pedal struggle!!

So at age 48, bought my dream drumkit: DW custom 8 piece, double bass, with DW 9000 pedals. This was after a 15 year hiatus of not playing much due to living in a condo. As a frame of reference, grew up playing my father’s 4 piece green sparkle Rogers kit that I added a few roto-toms, and played with a Ludwig double pedal. Main idol was Al VH, so loved playing DB shuffles. I am certainly an intermediate player but always was able to play most 80’s double bass stuff, and Bonham triplets, etc. reasonably well.

So when I initially got the new kit, I thought my feet were just rusty. It has now been 15 months and the DW 9000 pedals have never felt right. I took one to the local drum store to make sure I understood how to adjust etc. Have attempted to adjust all settings and can’t seem to find a setting that feels good. Actually ran into another drummer who was a touring musician at that store visit. He told me when he switched from 5000 to 9000 he struggled at first but got it adjusted.

As an example, I have been on an Alice in Chain’s kick since this COVID mess started. Love Sean Kinney’s grooves and never appreciated how talented he is. 25 years ago on the Rogers kit I could play “Them Bones” with the 3 bass kicks in a row no problem. Well I have been trying to play the last month at 92 BPM and I am so sloppy!!! Never used to struggle at all with this. Maybe I am in denial, but has anyone had an issue getting a 9000 feel right? I am so tempted to try an Iron Cobra.

Any advice on how to dial in or tweak the settings on these pedals appreciated!!!
 
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C.M. Jones

Well-known member
I doubt the pedal has a mysterious setting you are yet to discover that will revolutionize its performance. One of two conditions, or perhaps some combination thereof, would seem to be at work:

I. You just don't like the pedal.

II. Your technique needs refinement, and you're attributing that shortcoming to the pedal instead. It's common for drummers who have taken over a decade off to recall, either accurately or inaccurately, how easily things once came to them. Memory is sometimes a hazy curtain that poses as a crystal chalice.

I wouldn't replace the pedal yet. I'd practice more. You might find the pedal a lot more obedient in a few months.
 

johnwesley

Silver Member
Gotta tell you, I had Iron Cobra Power Glide and loved it. For some odd reason I decided I needed the new Ludwig Atlas Pro and it took a while to get it dialed in. Even then it didn't feel as good as the Cobra I got rid of. BTW both the Cobra and Ludwig were double pedal. Getting used to that instead of 2 bass drums is another story. Anyway about a year ago I read about the trick driveshaft as replacement and all reviews were positive so I spent the hundred bucks on one and BAM! BIG difference. That's my story, now back to you since you have 2 kicks. I'd give the Iron Cobra Power Glide a try. It really is a nice pedal. As reference I tried the DW 5000 and liked the Cobra more.
 

AzHeat

Platinum Member
Had the 9000 for a while. I just never warmed up to it and just couldn’t stay consistent. Got the much cheaper Yamaha 9500D and it was night and day. The 9000 looks way better, but the Yamaha won. I later got a Mapex Falcon and that’s been awesome as well.

I personally feel the 9000 is just too heavy and complicated and that’s the issue.
 

Bo Eder

Platinum Member
I dunno. I had the 9000 and it didn't feel too different from a 5000, so I stuck with the 5000. But your feet may be used to what you were using before, so it could be just that. You either have to readjust, or go back to what you were playing before. IT's not a requirement to play DW pedals because you have a DW kit, it is a requirement that you enjoy what you're playing.
 

rhumbagirl

Senior Member
I've been using the Pearl Eliminator (black) for the last year or so. Not many complaints. My DW 9000 pedal (single setup) is setup on the 18in Gretsch kick upstairs, and it's been setup as a light-tension Jojo pedal, so I can't really play it immediately after playing the Eliminator, which is setup higher tension. That said, when the 9000 is setup high-tension, it feels and works really well. I bought both pedals used, the 9000 almost 15 yrs ago off ebay - built like a tank.
 

Captain Bash

Silver Member
I own a use a DW 9000 , It has a slightly heavier feel than say a DW 5000 due it’s double chain drive, this translates the energy from your foot into volume. I like a naturally loud bass drum and the DW 9000 helps in this respect. When I need speed or less resistance I use an Axis longboard, but the AL has less power and thus volume (even with the same beater. The 9000 is very roadworthy. I haven’t made a single adjustment since the day of purchase where as many other pedals give up the ghost once they start getting used out of the rehearsal room. Ultimately if you don’t get on with the pedal sell it on and get another. One size does not fit all.
 

Frosticles

Silver Member
Had 9000's for a good few years now (& MDD's) I went from Iron Cobra Powerglides to the 9002's. I spent a long time setting them up to exactly how I wanted them. Little adjustments at a time till I was happy. I then traded my 9002's for the newer versions as I was never happy with how they attached to the BD Hoop. I copied all of the settings over.
Because I spent so long setting them up, I now have them perfect. I even emulated the feel of them when I got the MDD's :)
 

TK-421

Senior Member
Personally, I hate those heavy 2-sided DW beaters that come on the 9000s and most of DW’s pedals. If you think about it, a beater essentially acts as a pendulum. The heavier the beater head, the more it resists changing directions, which makes playing fast singles very difficult. That’s most likely why you’re struggling to play those triples on Them Bones.

i‘d start by trying a lighter beater, and see how that feels.
 
I doubt the pedal has a mysterious setting you are yet to discover that will revolutionize its performance. One of two conditions, or perhaps some combination thereof, would seem to be at work:

I. You just don't like the pedal.

II. Your technique needs refinement, and you're attributing that shortcoming to the pedal instead. It's common for drummers who have taken over a decade off to recall, either accurately or inaccurately, how easily things once came to them. Memory is sometimes a hazy curtain that poses as a crystal chalice.

I wouldn't replace the pedal yet. I'd practice more. You might find the pedal a lot more obedient in a few months.
Thanks for the feedback. No question I can practice more and have many shortcomings. I did go through Todd Sucherman’s 6 month course on Drumeo. He had a great excercise he calls “ The Rosetta Stone” that helps develop the bass drum foot. I’ll put some more time in with that.
 
I dunno. I had the 9000 and it didn't feel too different from a 5000, so I stuck with the 5000. But your feet may be used to what you were using before, so it could be just that. You either have to readjust, or go back to what you were playing before. IT's not a requirement to play DW pedals because you have a DW kit, it is a requirement that you enjoy what you're playing.
Dang, the sales guy said I must buy DW pedals! JK,🤪
 

Ronzo

Junior Member
I use to run dbl 5000s and found that a Trick Driveshaft improved the feel 100%. My main and slave pedals felt nearly identical after installing new driveshaft. Since moved to Yamaha pedals. Hope this helps.
 

SYMBOLIC DEATH

Senior Member
Personally, I hate those heavy 2-sided DW beaters that come on the 9000s and most of DW’s pedals. If you think about it, a beater essentially acts as a pendulum. The heavier the beater head, the more it resists changing directions, which makes playing fast singles very difficult. That’s most likely why you’re struggling to play those triples on Them Bones.

i‘d start by trying a lighter beater, and see how that feels.
That's why I used IC beaters when I had 5000's. Those double sided DW beaters are tanks. I still use IC beaters on my Axis pedals.
 

TK-421

Senior Member
That's why I used IC beaters when I had 5000's. Those double sided DW beaters are tanks. I still use IC beaters on my Axis pedals.
When I needed an extra double pedal but didn’t feel like spending big bucks, I bought a PDP 502, which is actually pretty nice for the price (I bought mine used in like-new condition for like $50). Except for those horrible heavy plastic beaters. I couldn’t even come close to doing quick singles with those tanks. So I got some Iron Cobra beaters for that pedal, and now it feels great! Nearly indistinguishable from my Yamaha Flying Dragon.

So yeah, DW pedals + IC beaters = HUGE improvement
 

PaisteGuy

Well-known member
I had a DW 5000 double pedal, that for the life of me, I just couldn’t get to feel right for me. Bought a 9000 double and it was so much better, and I haven’t changed any factory settings. I did add the Trick driveshaft, what a world of difference, took the lag right out. As mentioned above, try the IC beaters first (less money) and see if that works. Then try the trick driveshaft (more money) second.
 
I had a DW 5000 double pedal, that for the life of me, I just couldn’t get to feel right for me. Bought a 9000 double and it was so much better, and I haven’t changed any factory settings. I did add the Trick driveshaft, what a world of difference, took the lag right out. As mentioned above, try the IC beaters first (less money) and see if that works. Then try the trick driveshaft (more money) second.

Just ordered an IC beater so we’ll see if that helps.
 
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Ronzo

Junior Member
Forgive my ignorance but what is the trick drive shaft and who makes it? Just ordered an IC beater so we’ll see if that helps.
Trick drums makes the drive shaft.
 
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