Dunnett Stainless Steel 2n and Smooth Shell Snare Question

R2112

Silver Member
I've searched a number of times but can't seem to find an answer to my specific question.

What sonic differences (if any) are there between the Dunnett 2n beaded stainless steel shell and the Dunnett smooth stainless steel shell? I've read a few generalized statements about the differences in beaded vs smooth shell constructions but I'd like to know if anyone here has played both those Dunnett drums specifically and if any sonic difference was heard. I've also searched Youtube and found a number of demos of both drums individually but haven't found any side by side comparisons.

Thanks all in advance!
 

mandrew

Gold Member
If I remember correctly, a bead adds strength, but also raises the fundamental pitch. I believe that Adrian Kirchler of AK drums has a short demo of two shells, one with one bead, and one with two beads. You can here a marked difference in pitch.
 
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Ghostnote

Guest
I haven't played or seen a 2N in person, but I do have a Dunnett SS drum. It sounds good in large rooms, but in medium to small rooms it has a weird sort of hollowness going on, like the tone sound and the snare sound are not integrated. I've tried different heads, different snares, different tunings, and that particular characteristic is always present, so it is intrinsic to the drum itself. The only thing I can guess at attributing it to would be the straight bearing edges, since that is the only major difference besides shell material between the Dunnett and my other snare drums. Perhaps the 2N, with its flanged top edge, addresses this issue?
 

jbonzo1

Silver Member
Are the AK shells seamless?
It would be interesting to compare a welded and seamless shell of the same material.
 
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Ghostnote

Guest
They are rolled and welded, as are Dunnett shells. I think it's kind of like the wrapped vs lacquered drums debate- some people claim they can hear a difference, but I doubt many could actually hear a difference blindfolded. There are too many other factors that influence the sound of a drum to a greater extent. That said, I still like the idea of a spun shell just because it's cool to be able to make a tube out of one piece of sheet metal with no seam.
 

R2112

Silver Member
If I remember correctly, a bead adds strength, but also raises the fundamental pitch. I believe that Adrian Kirchler of AK drums has a short demo of two shells, one with one bead, and one with two beads. You can here a marked difference in pitch.
Yes, that's what I've heard too and I have seen that Adrian video showcasing that. The difference between the two shells in that video is clear. However, I read somewhere that Ronn described his 2n beaded stainless shell as being "warmer" than the original smooth shell. Which I thought he would have described it as being "brighter" due to the typical higher pitch from the bead?

I haven't played or seen a 2N in person, but I do have a Dunnett SS drum. It sounds good in large rooms, but in medium to small rooms it has a weird sort of hollowness going on, like the tone sound and the snare sound are not integrated. I've tried different heads, different snares, different tunings, and that particular characteristic is always present, so it is intrinsic to the drum itself. The only thing I can guess at attributing it to would be the straight bearing edges, since that is the only major difference besides shell material between the Dunnett and my other snare drums. Perhaps the 2N, with its flanged top edge, addresses this issue?
That's interesting about your snare. Have you heard of that problem before with any other Dunnett SS owners? Do you think it may have a defect of some sort?
 
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Ghostnote

Guest
That's interesting about your snare. Have you heard of that problem before with any other Dunnett SS owners? Do you think it may have a defect of some sort?
I haven't been able to find any defects. The weld is well done and invisible after the shell was brushed. The drum is in round, and the bearing edges are flat. The strainer locks up at times, but it does tension the snares evenly and flat to the bottom head. The only thing I can think of is the absence of a flange on the top and bottom bearing edges. I haven't heard other Dunnett owners complaining of this, so I don't think it's a common occurrence. I played a 6.5x14 Dunnett SS years and years ago and I don't remember it sounding anything like my drum sounds.
 

Push pull stroke

Platinum Member
Yes, that's what I've heard too and I have seen that Adrian video showcasing that. The difference between the two shells in that video is clear. However, I read somewhere that Ronn described his 2n beaded stainless shell as being "warmer" than the original smooth shell. Which I thought he would have described it as being "brighter" due to the typical higher pitch from the bead.
Any obstruction on the inside of a shell will warm/dry the sound a little. Hammering does the same thing.
 

R2112

Silver Member
That makes sense. A bead adds rigidity. Rigidity raises pitch. I guess that's similar to a rigid hard wood shell having a higher pitch than a less rigid softer wood shell?
 

Andy

Administrator
Staff member
I guess that's similar to a rigid hard wood shell having a higher pitch than a less rigid softer wood shell?
The rigidity element = yes, but more feeds into it than that with a non uniform organic material.
 
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