Drums with 2 vent holes.

mrmike

Silver Member
My new Yamaha Sensitive Series snare has 2 vent holes which must affect the drum in a certain way. I think Noble & Cooley also use 2 holes on their snares. I am not sure of the physics but I do know the Yamaha is the best sounding snare in my collection.

Multiple holes will make the drum louder and drier but I am thinking 2 half inch holes directly across from each other might be the optimum design. Do any other companies use more than one vent hole?
 
C

Crazy8s

Guest
My advice is to not drill holes in drums, except for mounting hardware on it. On the snares that I make, I do not put vents in them. On tom-toms, I hide a very tiny hole behind a tension rod so that environmental air pressure changes are compensated for.

If you drill two more holes in a drum that you already like, you run the risk of negatively impacting the sound and you can't undrill a hole except to plug it with something potentially ugly.

Of course there is nothing wrong with doing it, its just if you don't like it when you are done you are kind of stuck with it. A drum with such modifications has a lesser resale value too.
 

evolving_machine

Silver Member
I have a Gretsch Catalina Club jazz kit. The overhead tom tom has two vent holes. However, I believe they did it so that if the drummer is a right handed or a left handed drummer, the Gretsch logo would be visible to the audience.

Is it possible that these high end snare drums are doing the same thing? Is it to show their logo to a potential customer in the audience, advertising?

With two holes, the air inside the drum can leave faster. But, the amount of air leaving the drum would be equivalent to the amount of volume displaced from hitting the head with the stick. I do not believe the stick moves the head that much to warrant a second vent hole. As far as being louder, I am not too sure of that either. The drum is louder at the vent hole then if there was a solid shell there. Perhaps, the second hole is to make the sound more Omni directional?
 

Average

Senior Member
I picked up a 1975 Slingerland Chrome over Brass snare with the TDR strainer. It took a bit of elbow grease and some scouring the internet for parts but it is now fully restored. One of the interesting thing about this snare is that it has 3 vent holes. They aren't any bigger than the usual vent holes but there are 3, spaced equidistant from each other. I would characterize its sound as very dry. My understanding is it was marketed that way. The snare strands on the TDR (total dynamic response) extend beyond the snare bed. It is a very sensitive and dry snare. Not many overtones to speak of and very little ring. Its a pretty good snare for orchestral playing. The other snare I used to use a lot for orchestral playing was an early 60's Ludwig LM400 with super sensitive snares. Its another extremely sensitive snare but still has the sound characteristics of a typical LM400. Depending on set up it can be very ringy.

I also have a 2010 Noble and Cooley Alloy Classic. It has one normal-sized vent hole which is situated underneath the strainer. I've played a few other Noble and Cooley snares, but I don't remember how many vent holes they had.

Not sure if that information will be useful to you, but I would second the advice given above to not drill any more holes in a snare that is working for you as is.
 

Blk Diamond

Senior Member
The Eric Singer signature snare by Pearl had three, evenly spaced, regular sized vent holes.
The 10 ply maple snare was designed and marketed as being a drier, more penetrating sound.
Despite it being one of the most popular and highly regarded of the signature snares, Pearl recently discontinued the Eric Singer model.
This move stunned me and many other Pearl aficionados.
However, I believe that Pearl has something new in the works with Eric, and needed to "kill off" the older model. Only time will tell.
 

mrmike

Silver Member
Not sure if that information will be useful to you, but I would second the advice given above to not drill any more holes in a snare that is working for you as is.
Oh no! Never drill into any snare that already sounds great or of any collectible value. I am just saying that there might be a desirable affect of having more than one vent hole.

I trust that Yamaha made their latest and greatest snare with 2 holes for some reason other than marketing. For one, their web site says absolutely nothing about multiple vent holes but instead talks about the behring edges and snare beds. The logo is on only one of the holes and the other just has a grommet. I would say this snare definitely chokes less than other snares no matter how tight you tension the snares or at low and high tunings but still has clarity when playing grace notes. I think this might be because of the second vent hole. Forgive me if I sound like a Yamaha employee but I feel Yamaha has hit a home run with this snare.

The HUGE vent holes will make the drum louder and drier. I don't think you can really compare that kind of drum to a drum that has one or two extra small holes. Of course it's a good idea to drill as few holes as possible but when the average wood snare has 25 to 50 holes drilled in it, I really don't think one extra small hole is going to reduce shell resonance by much.

This is from the Noble & Cooley web site. I think it is talking about their kits and not their snares.http://www.noblecooley.com/prod_cdkit.html
 

Otto

Platinum Member
One thing to be aware of when evaluating the sound is that large aperature venting allows greater sound energy to exit from inside the shell...which changes the tambre. When valuing the different tambres, try to compensate for the emotional value of higher amplitude when making your decisions.

I find that greater venting of a shell creates an 'airy' sound...where a smaller vent aperature calls on the shells natural resonance and reduces the amplitude to a greater degree due to absobtion by the shell.

I remeber a snare design from long ago(havent seen one in a while) that had a split shell design - sound was reminicent of a snare out on a football field.
 

larryace

"Uncle Larry"
The Eric Singer signature snare by Pearl had three, evenly spaced, regular sized vent holes.
The 10 ply maple snare was designed and marketed as being a drier, more penetrating sound.
Despite it being one of the most popular and highly regarded of the signature snares, Pearl recently discontinued the Eric Singer model.
This move stunned me and many other Pearl aficionados.
However, I believe that Pearl has something new in the works with Eric, and needed to "kill off" the older model. Only time will tell.
This is my main #1 most fav snare. I'll never understand why they discontinued it since it's so popular and highly regarded. Whatever. I got it free through a GC promotion at the end of 2005. Free! It's a 419.00 drum! I love the sound of that drum. I went in, to buy a set of Pearl Session Customs, then you filled out and sent in this form along with a copy of your drumset receipt. Then 3 weeks later, Pearl sent you your choice of 1 of 2 signature drums, either a Tico Torres or Eric Singer. It was just fortunate timing on my part that I wanted to buy a set of Pearls at the exact time that promotion was going on. I knew nothing about the promotion going in, I just wanted a set of Session Customs. I originally selected the Tico drum, (A free floating aluminum if memory serves) but changed my mind at the last minute. I'm so glad I did, because that thick maple drum just satisfies my soul like nothing else. Now that it's being discontinued, even better!
 

Blk Diamond

Senior Member
Wow Larry,

You lucky dog you!

I wish that I was given that choice when I bought my Masters back in 2006!
Tico's free floater is nice, but I would have made the same choice that you did. I'm sure that you are glad that you did.
Maybe someday I'll be able to get my hands on a used ES signature snare.
I still have my fingers crossed that Eric and Pearl have a new snare in the works. Hope springs eternal. ;-)
 
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