drums positioning in rooms

opentune

Platinum Member
All other factors the same, if you have rectangular room, all walls/ceiling the same material, rug on floor, do you setup drums along the long wall, or at the end along the short wall?
What's the logic or physics for the better sound result?
And how far for the wall behind you?

I have figured out by now drums don't sound good say angled in corners. I never like the drum sound in that setup, as popular as it is in clubs and practices spaces.
 
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Morrisman

Platinum Member
Is this for recording, or live gigs, or home practice?

I prefer the sound of my drums away from all walls - eg. in the centre of the room. If I must be by a wall, I prefer one with curtains or sound absorbers of some kind. In a smooth room I'd set up in the middle, or on a long wall so that I only have one wall nearby.

My experience with bass amps is that they need to be right against a wall, or at least 6 feet away, or else you get individual notes booming out twice as loud as the rest.
This would probably apply to tom toms and bass drums too - some toms will be amplified by a wall, and others will be cancelled out by that same wall.
Theoretically, a 100Hz floor tom would sound thin 2.5 feet from a wall, and would sound deep and loud 5ft from a wall.
I've never tested this properly. The floor and ceiling will also make a difference, so it gets complex though.
 

opentune

Platinum Member
Ok but 'all factors the same' so no curtains behind you and all surfaces the same except a rug on floor. Let's just say for 'overall sound'..... A gig in a room this dimension, or a practice room this dimension. Am wondering about anything general on drum acoustics in rooms like this.
 
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Ghostnote

Guest
I don't know about general rules, etc, but in my last house my drum room was about 13'x21' with a 7' ceiling and from the drivers seat my kit sounded the best when it was set up in the middle of the long wall. My back was about 6" off the wall when I was sitting behind the kit.
 

No Way Jose

Silver Member
I'm not so concerned about where in the room my drums are but I always want something - table with coats on it, or furniture, in the corner. It reduces the boominess.
 

Drumquake

Junior Member
I think the room is more important than the placement of the drums.

I know this isn't an exact answer to what you asked, but If you want a cheaper but precise fix for a boomy or unreverberated room, this is what I've seen professional acousticians do--at least for smaller rooms:

They cover only one wall and one corner with damping material. The corner should be of thicker material; it's meant to be more like a bass trap. If you also have a carpet on the floor(or damping in the ceiling) then this method alone drastically reduces the amount of "bouncing" the sound can do.
 

bermuda

Drummerworld Pro Drummer - Administrator
Staff member
Facing out from a corner (if you have the available space) helps emphasize low end on the kick & large toms. Same theory as putting your sub-woofer in the corner to maximize the low end.

Bermuda
 

opentune

Platinum Member
Interesting about the corner. Never knew that. I do find the rest of the kit never sounds good in a corner, but that is an opinion from the drivers seat. Maybe sounds better in a mic out in middle of room.
The drums sound excellent along the long wall, and I am wondering what physics is involved. The room is not boomy, for it has a rug and rest is drywall with a nice stuffy couch in there helping matters. I just wondered why the long wall works best.
I also wonder why all rooms I've played in with wood walls are truly excellent for drums, at least to my ears.
 
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Ghostnote

Guest
Wood walls sound much better than drywall. Drywall is pretty crappy really. My last drum room had tongue and groove pine on the walls and it sounded great. I'm building another room in my garage and I'm going to have to live with drywall for a while, but when I can afford it I'm going to finish the walls and ceiling with pine and add wide spaced 1x4's onto the surface. Each wall will have them running in a different direction, ie: one wall horizontal, the wall across from it vertical, the other two walls diagonal in different directions from one another. I'm trying to somewhat copy the drum room in Avatar Studios.
 
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