Drumming Rudiments Technique Help?

Hi Everyone,


I'm a pretty new drummer. Over Christmas I really want to perfect my technique playing rudiments singles/doubles/paradidles etc. I'm not interested necessarily in speed but just improving my overall technique. I know speed comes with slow practice I get that so there's no need to rush right. I was taking lessons once a week but due to covid at the moment it's been a struggle. The problem is I've been finding is when seeing other instructors explaining the rudiments they're all explaining them differently which leaves me confused thinking what's the correct technique.
My question is just say I'm practicing single stroke rolls at different subdivisions with a metronome set at 50BPM. How does someone know when to move on with the tempo because I'm always second guessing myself thinking is that good enough. I want to feel like I'm making progress with my drumming not staying in the same place. I don't want to create bad habits in my drumming Be nice to know how people practice there technique and making progress with their drumming?

Cheers guys hope someone could help

Merry Christmas
 
Last edited:

larryace

"Uncle Larry"
I always thought hand technique should come before rudiments.

Not all teachers teach technique. It's a sticky subject. (hey that's a pun!)

FWIW, IMO, one goal of technique is to not use the elbows to move the sticks. Wrists and opening of the hand FTW.

My teacher taught me a method that is basically a one handed clap. (Matched) Except with a drumstick in your hand
 

Push pull stroke

Platinum Member
You never move on from playing warmups with big, slow motions. I spend the first 15-20 minutes of practice playing super, super slow, mostly hand technique, but also some foot technique and whatever grooves I’m working on. The only question is how fast you can push it before it sounds uneven and uncontrolled. THAT’S what changes over time. Recording yourself really helps you know how you’re really sounding.
 

MrInsanePolack

Platinum Member
My question is just say I'm practicing single stroke rolls at different subdivisions with a metronome set at 50BPM. How does someone know when to move on with the tempo because I'm always second guessing myself thinking is that good enough.
Since you brought up subdivisions, here is some food for thought:
1/4 notes @ 50bpm starting point
1/8th notes @ 50bpm = 1/4 notes @ 100bpm
1/16th notes @ 50bpm = 1/8th notes @ 100bpm = 1/4 notes @ 200bpm

By subdividing you are already playing different tempos if you just shift the meter (if that makes sense). If you want to gauge your progress, give yourself a time goal. When you can consistently hit that goal, you can either extend the time or up the tempo like 5bpm. If you want to be really specific about it, keep a log of your progress so you can actually see how you have improved.

And keep subdividing. It will make life much easier in the long run.
 

Odd-Arne Oseberg

Platinum Member
Technique is quite personal. There really is no one way.

Maybe if you can give an example of what's confusing between two different resources.
 
Information and knowledge is not everything - you'll eventually want a feel for the sticks and reflexes that you develop by playing and practicing different exercises. I try not to look at e.g. the Moeller Stroke as a technique that is executed 100% like on youtube (I never play that loudly with sticks starting vertically!) but as an exercise that requires different motions that you might not even be completely aware of while playing.
You won't perfect your technique over the holidays and if you let things sink in, keep an open mind and evaluate what you're doing, you'll get there. Just don't hurt yourself and play too much at too high tempos. :)
 

Al Strange

Well-known member
Some great advice above. I recommend concentrating on your singles, doubles and flams leading with both hands. Get these right and the rudiments will look after themselves...keep smashing it!! (y) :)
 

brentcn

Platinum Member
How does someone know when to move on with the tempo because I'm always second guessing myself thinking is that good enough.
Increase the tempo. If your technique doesn't get crappy, stay at that tempo. Set up a mirror so you can be a good judge of your technique.

Double strokes are super important, because they exist by themselves, and also in roll rudiments and paradiddle rudiments. Practice along with this video every day. Use a mirror so you can be a good judge of your own technique. Use a practice pad and a metronome, obviously.


One more time: Use a mirror. And a metronome.
 

TMe

Senior Member
How does someone know when to move on with the tempo...

I don't think you'll ever get a definitive answer to that question.

If you're unsure, I'd suggest you practice everything at three tempos. Start four clicks (four standard metronome settings, not 4 bpm) below your comfortable tempo and play with exaggerated motion. Then play at your comfortable tempo. Then spend a bit of time (not too much) pushing for speed.

Some people suggest starting at 50% of your comfortable tempo, but I think you'd need to be a saint to have that kind of patience.
 
I think get the great hands for a lifetime by Tommy Igoe
Thanks man I'll check it out
I don't think you'll ever get a definitive answer to that question.

If you're unsure, I'd suggest you practice everything at three tempos. Start four clicks (four standard metronome settings, not 4 bpm) below your comfortable tempo and play with exaggerated motion. Then play at your comfortable tempo. Then spend a bit of time (not too much) pushing for speed.

Some people suggest starting at 50% of your comfortable tempo, but I think you'd need to be a saint to have that kind of patience.
Thanks I'll give that a shot and tell you how I get on
 
Increase the tempo. If your technique doesn't get crappy, stay at that tempo. Set up a mirror so you can be a good judge of your technique.

Double strokes are super important, because they exist by themselves, and also in roll rudiments and paradiddle rudiments. Practice along with this video every day. Use a mirror so you can be a good judge of your own technique. Use a practice pad and a metronome, obviously.


One more time: Use a mirror. And a metronome.
So I've started practicing this every day with my practice sessions, I'll tell you how I get on thanks for the advise.
 
Some great advice above. I recommend concentrating on your singles, doubles and flams leading with both hands. Get these right and the rudiments will look after themselves...keep smashing it!! (y) :)
Thanks yeah my goals these couple of months is focusing on these rudiments I'll let you know how I get on thanks
 
Since you brought up subdivisions, here is some food for thought:
1/4 notes @ 50bpm starting point
1/8th notes @ 50bpm = 1/4 notes @ 100bpm
1/16th notes @ 50bpm = 1/8th notes @ 100bpm = 1/4 notes @ 200bpm

By subdividing you are already playing different tempos if you just shift the meter (if that makes sense). If you want to gauge your progress, give yourself a time goal. When you can consistently hit that goal, you can either extend the time or up the tempo like 5bpm. If you want to be really specific about it, keep a log of your progress so you can actually see how you have improved.

And keep subdividing. It will make life much easier in the long run.
Thsnks for the advise. I've been logging my progress every practice session. increasing the BPM in slight increments, so I'm knowing that I'm progressing I'll let you know how I getting on cheers
 

Xstr8edgtnrdrmrX

Well-known member
Hi Everyone,


I'm a pretty new drummer. Over Christmas I really want to perfect my technique playing rudiments singles/doubles/paradidles etc. I'm not interested necessarily in speed but just improving my overall technique. I know speed comes with slow practice I get that so there's no need to rush right. I was taking lessons once a week but due to covid at the moment it's been a struggle. The problem is I've been finding is when seeing other instructors explaining the rudiments they're all explaining them differently which leaves me confused thinking what's the correct technique.
My question is just say I'm practicing single stroke rolls at different subdivisions with a metronome set at 50BPM. How does someone know when to move on with the tempo because I'm always second guessing myself thinking is that good enough. I want to feel like I'm making progress with my drumming not staying in the same place. I don't want to create bad habits in my drumming Be nice to know how people practice there technique and making progress with their drumming?

Cheers guys hope someone could help

Merry Christmas

with my students, we do the rudiments using two different steps, and they feed off of each other:

1. Slow > Fast > Slow : in this step, you play the rudiment starting real slow, and then you slowly speed up. As you do this, you will encounter a speed/tempo where you either start "stumbling" the sticking, or where you start feeling tension, which means you have reached the upper threshold of where your muscles will take you; once you reach this tempo, note what it is**, and then start slowing back down to the original real slow tempo you started at

** - you can note this tempo by stopping, tapping it out with a metronome, and then writing it down. This is called the Trouble Tempo

2. step 2: set the metronome for 10 beats slower than the Trouble Tempo, and then run the rudiment at this slower tempo for about 1-2 minutes. Stop, then move the met up 5 beats, and do that again for 1-2 minutes; stop, go up 5 more beats, run it for 1-2 minutes etc. etc.

I have been using this system for 30+ years, and for me, it is the most effective, as long as you don't "outplay" your technique, and fall to bad habits (fingers sticking off the stick; pumping from elbows; not suing wrists etc.)

here is a great video by Dr. John Wooten doing this with the paradiddle. I did some master classes him waaaayyyyy back in the 90's when he was workign with Phantom Regiment and it. changed the way I played and taught the rudiments


in fact, this whole page on the rudiments on the Vic Firth website is technically a "Bible" of sorts for learning the rudiment
 

jazzerooty

Junior Member
As you can see in the postings above there are tons of "methods" that offer rudimental mastery. They each offer tons of confusing exercises that resemble an obstacle course. And then you have the rudiment gurus--Bruce Becker, etc.--who offer THE BIG SECRETS that will supposedly give you the proverbial "keys to the kingdom." Why not turn up that metronome? Everyone says the key to speed is to play slow. No. You need to push past your limits. I don't know a marathoner who practices for a race by walking. Don't be afraid. Good drummers all seem to have one thing in common: They throw out the rules if they don't serve their purpose. Watch the drummers you love as they perform. Learn your singles, doubles, flams and paradiddles and you'll be okay. And, yeah--push yourself. Don't be afraid.
 

mrfingers

Senior Member
As jazzerooty said,”Learn your singles, doubles, flams and paradiddles and you'll be okay. And, yeah--push yourself. Don't be afraid.”
 
I learned it all at once in balance. Technique, rudiments etc. Just focus each day's practice session on the area you need to improve.

Playing music you like to listen to as a metronome also keeps the session enjoyable. Doubles are boring and 10 minutes of metronome clicks feel like an hour, throw some of your favorite songs on and play in time with that. Helps to relax too, everyone gets all stiff.

Once I had the rudiment down, I used to throw on Hip/hop or if I wanted to push my speed, some junk like blink-182 helped. Also helps with your mind while you play, no one ever performed with a metronome click alone ... so much more to it all, focus on dynamics as the music crescendos or tapers, play harder or lighter, try out each of your instructors techniques. No reason you can't be musical while practicing basics.
 
Last edited:

MrInsanePolack

Platinum Member
Doubles are boring and 10 minutes of metronome clicks feel like an hour, [...] everyone gets all stiff with rudiments lol.
I love turning on the click and running rudiments on the pad. I'm not alone in this. Sometimes 2 hours only feels like 10 minutes. It can be enjoyable if you allow it.
no one ever performed with a metronome click
Anyone who plays to backing tracks is performing with a click. Its not unusual at all.
 
I love turning on the click and running rudiments on the pad. I'm not alone in this. Sometimes 2 hours only feels like 10 minutes. It can be enjoyable if you allow it.

Anyone who plays to backing tracks is performing with a click. Its not unusual at all.

I revised that post for more clarity. My fault haha.

Absolutely you perform with a click, a conductor, gestures or breathing with other musicians. My whole point was aimed at making practice fun for the basics, and that's what did it for me. There's also definitely catharsis with just a metronome, you're not alone.
 
Top