Drumming Philosophy...

lilerm8302

Junior Member
As a teacher in the public school system, I am required to share my teaching philosophy with my colleagues, administrators and parents. So, it got me thinking about drums.

So, my question to you is: What is your drumming philosophy? I'll leave it open-ended...interpret "philosophy" subjectively.

Thanks for sharing in advance!
 

Davo-London

Gold Member
Really tricky question.

I guess it would be to create a performance that grooves but also creates interest for the listener.

These are often counter and so the balance of the two is a good philosophy.

Davo
 

lilerm8302

Junior Member
Really tricky question.

I guess it would be to create a performance that grooves but also creates interest for the listener.

These are often counter and so the balance of the two is a good philosophy.

Davo
I know! Can you tell that I am used to posting "journal prompts" to my students.
 
A

Anthony Amodeo

Guest
be creative and express myself appropriately within the musical situation

let emotions drive the bus, but dont let them crash the bus or drive too slowly in the left lane

appropriate expression is what every musician should strive for
 

bruin21

Member
Within a band? I am the engine that moves the bus. Be reliable and never get in the way of the music.

Teaching? that is a two way street. If a student is not willing to put in the same time and effort and dedication to learn the craft as I did, then the results will only be, at best, mixed. (I used to teach all maner of chemistry at the university level).
 

NUTHA JASON

Senior Administrator
My philosophy is to have as much fun drumming as possible and hope that my fun is palpable and contageous in performance. i play therefore i am.
j
 

Shedboyxx

Silver Member
"Have a Good time, All the time...that's my philosophy, Marty" - Viv Savage, Spinal Tap


Someone had to say it..:)

But seriously..
It can be very contextual. I think the nature of most of my work would be groove centered. Trying to provide a musical atmosphere with an infrastructure that flows and supports the other players in general.

However.

Someone just forwarded me a local L.A. performance at a club called the Baked Potato with Terry Bozzio and Alex Acuna. That's it. No other musicians.

Anyone familiar with Terry's work knows he is doing quite a bit of solo drumming or pieces he's written with drum set as the solo instrument. That hasn't always been his focus but these days it is.

This context would have at least more "philosophies" at work. I don't get involved with this but others especially in the jazz world do.

Jim
 

dmacc_2

Well-known member
- Be a lifelong learner
- Share openly and willingly
- Give free lessons to at least one person who can’t afford lessons otherwise
- Give 100% of your best musical self to each and every musical setting you are in
- Be fun to work with and hardworking
- Realize that opinions and approaches differ and no one is right 100% of the time
 
Last edited by a moderator:

MaryO

Platinum Member
Practice hard, learn my craft, live my passion, create a joyful noise and a happy heart.

Don't always live up to it but it's what I strive for behind my kit.
 

Dr_Watso

Platinum Member
I just want to be exactly like Travis Barker. I even refuse to wear a shirt in nice restaurants.

...

My drumming philosophy is to make good music and remember that the music comes first way ahead of fancy fills, "blast beats", tons of kit pieces, or any kind of showing off.

It can be summed up like so:
Listen. Use your ears and compliment the music. Don't listen for a place to put in your cool new move, listen for a place you can make the music itself sound better.
 

Midnite Zephyr

Platinum Member
Drum today for tomorrow we may die. I'm a yes man when it comes to drumming.

Live to drum, drum to live. It's like Tai-chi. Does a drum set have Feng Shui?

"It's like some kind of psychedelic experience"
 

Mad About Drums

Pollyanna's Agent
This quote from Brian Blade define it much better than I can...

"You need to take risks, you never know if the end results will be beautiful or strange, you need to be instantaneous, listening to every moments, without missing a scrap of the music, even if you play a rest!" - Brian Blade


...yeah, this and also, having fun doing it :)
 

Anon La Ply

Renegade
I have so many drumming philosophies that I can't remember any of them, in which case I have none. Ideally, I'd like to have a clear mind every time I play and just react naturally as my ears decide. Ideally.
 

wesporter

Member
When I was in college, my jazz professor said, "It's not the drummers job to keep time, that's EVERYONE's job, its the drummers job to make time interesting"

I have lived by that philosophy ever since. My job as a drummer is to make the music dance, it whatever context that may be. All music dances, whether its pop, r&b, funk, country, hip hop, rock, metal, latin, classic, polka, bluegrass, etc... I strive to make the music feel good. Even when I solo, I try to make it feel good and "dance" musically. As far as soloing I live by a quote from Gene Krupa who said, "I was taught to play dance drums, so even in the wildest solo I could possibly play, if I felt that the beat wasn't there and people couldn't dance to it, I'd feel that I was failing in the solo".

I've gotten a lot of compliments over the years from other drummers on things like my single stroke speed, my application of rudiments into fills, my twirling ability lol......but the greatest compliments I ever receive are from other non-drummer musicians or non-musicians who tell me I bring new life and energy to the music. My bassists girlfriend who is not a musician but a huge music fan once said that I was "one of the most musical drummers" she'd ever heard. That was one of the best compliments I ever got and I still remember that.
When I see girls (and guys for that matter) on the dance floor, shakin their booty, and getting lost in the groove that I'm laying down, that's the greatest high in the world.
 

drstrangefunk

Senior Member
1. Smack That Snare HARD.
2. Put Foot In It.
3. Drop It Like It's Hot.
4. Do What The Song Calls For* (it's There, If You Listen).
 

Drumolator

Platinum Member
I usually play for the song, but I also seem to "amp it up" once in a while. Technique is the means to play what is in your head. Peace and goodwill.
 

larryace

"Uncle Larry"
1. Smack That Snare HARD.
2. Put Foot In It.
3. Drop It Like It's Hot.
4. Do What The Song Calls For* (it's There, If You Listen).
What if the song calls for a snare that is played lightly? You smack the snare hard no matter what? Of course you don't. Right?
 
Top