Drumming Patterns: The Components of Rhythm & Technique

beet

Well-known member
Here is a proposed application by combining ideas from two books. One is the Drumming Patterns of this thread (DP).

An interesting book that I have only seen the free introduction is Drumming in All Directions (DID). It is an independence book that you can read about yourself.

An interesting concept in DID is to use a transition from let’s say R->Lr. This is one of his examples. Right hand changes to (simultaneous) Left hand and right foot. There are supposedly 50 combinations in the book and lots of exercises.

So, I was thinking of applying the two states as RL combinations in Drumming Patterns. So the DP “R” is a DID “R”. The DP “L” is the DID “Lr”. (These would change as different DID combinations are selected). RLRLL becomes R, Lr, R, Lr, Lr. And some combos like L->Rrl would be L, Rrl, L, Rrl, Rrl.

This may not be the most “complete” way but may get me a quick run-through by running the concepts of two books. The DID book has their own systems that seem useful. But, Drumming Patterns simple RLRLL style is easy to go through and is supposedly all the useful patterns.

I’m playing around with this. As a practical matter, running through all the patterns in DP may get the body exposed to the useful patterns with less brain energy.

It may make sense to start with patterns starting with all L’s and loop them until I’m used to them. Then, go to all those starting with R’s. Anyway, this is an experiment using multiple limb combinations from DID and applying them using DP. I think when the physical right or left hand comes up, any surface such as snare, tom or cymbal could be used. Whatever I feel like at the moment.

I don’t know all the limb combinations in the DiD book as I’ve just seen the preview pages. In any case, I’m looking at a simplified way to apply the concepts of the two books. I probably need to get the DID book later.

This is a fun “thinking” post.
 
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beet

Well-known member
Just to explain some math for the DID. If we describe the system as A -> B, if a limb is in A, then it is not in B for a 50 combination system. The 50 combinations are for non-repeating limbs. A more realistic version IMO would be to let limbs carry over, as long as A and B are not identical. This results in (I think) about 100 combinations. I haven’t seen the book yet but based on the 50 combinations mentioned, it seems to not allow the carry over or “overlap.” So, I think a sequence such as Llr->LR is not listed in DID since the L carries over. I think realistically carry over happens in drumming and I will experiment with that.

In any case, I experimented and found the l->LRr was weak for me and used the Drumming Patterns 8A sticking pattern with it. It seems helpful to me anyway.

Edit - Math following:
The DID book mentions 50 patterns. This includes both a sequence and its reverse. So, both L->R and R->L would be counted. If you remove the reverse sequences, there would be 25 of them. I think if overlap/carry-over is allowed, 210 sequences would be made. If the reverse sequences are removed, 105 would remain.
 
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toddbishop

Platinum Member
That Drumming In All Directions looks like an interesting book. Looking at the sample pages, it's all normal stuff he's doing there, but he's kind of made it needlessly difficult-- to me. I'm writing some comments on it on my site. I'll post a link when that's done.
 

beet

Well-known member
That Drumming In All Directions looks like an interesting book. Looking at the sample pages, it's all normal stuff he's doing there, but he's kind of made it needlessly difficult-- to me. I'm writing some comments on it on my site. I'll post a link when that's done.
I thought the DID implementation wasn’t that “simple” so I proposed using the Drumming Patterns book’s patterns to “move through” the limb changes. Also, I think a limb should be allowed to carry-over which increases the combinations. I can’t say if that is for the better. Maybe actual experimentation will indicate if the extra carry-over combinations are useful.
 
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beet

Well-known member
So I’m glancing at the DID book from the library. It does have a lot more stuff than the preview download. There are some ostinatos involved as well. The patterns are laid out by categories. After I go through a DP-style run-through, I may consider going through the DID book. It seems like a lot of work.

DID does not use a sequence that carries any limbs over or Overlap. Here is an example of the different versions. I am trying both using the DP 8A.

DP R: Rr
DP L (no overlap choices): L, l, or Ll
DP L (Overlap choices): RLr, RL, Lr, Rrl, Rl, rl, RLrl, RLl, Lrl, R, r

IMO, the overlap sequences are more difficult and some are probably more realistic as well.

edit: the 50 DID sequences are probably enough for most people. That would take a lot of time as it is. Increasing the number to a total of 210 could make the book unmanageable.
 
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beet

Well-known member
I made a thread to discuss applying the DP pattern concepts to analyze the 36 examples in the Ted Reed book Combination of Syncopation and Rolls. More to follow the initial post as I write it up.

 
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