Drumming issues... need help.

ILK

Junior Member
All right, i´ve been drumming for almost a year, i learned all by myself, with some help from the internet and LOTS of watching Ringo Starr´s technique (He is great !), but theres some things i cant quite learn:

1.- Drum Rolls.- Like the ones Ringo does in "Nowhere Man", i just dont understand, i know its about letting the stick bounce, but i dont get them to sound that good.

2.- Double Kick Bass Drum.- How to make double kicks faster? My foot does not respond when trying to increaase the speed. :)

3.- I get extremely tired after playing consecutively for about 1 hour or 2... any tips or excercises for my arms?

Thanks for answering and sorry my bad english. :)
 

Volentry

Senior Member
Main tip: take it slow. I don't listen to The Beatles, but rolls are developed step by step, they don't come instantly.

If you are trying to develop your rolls, start with a slow speed, probably about 60bpm and work your way up in tempo WITHOUT losing consistency and remaining relaxed. There's no shortcut to develops single strokes and double strokes, it just takes practice and time.

Same thing for double bass. Work your way in speed slowly.

When you reach a threshold in speed which you still can remain relaxed and consistent, continue playing at that tempo nonstop for a few minutes. This will build stamina. Try again the next day and see if you can increase the tempo.

Goodluck.
 

Pocket-full-of-gold

Platinum Member
Main tip: take it slow.

If you are trying to develop your rolls, start with a slow speed,

Same thing for double bass. Work your way in speed slowly.
+1

Play it SLOWLY, CLEANLY and EVENLY. Doesn't matter if it's your hands or feet...or your head, you're working on. If you can't control it when playing slowly, you'll have no hope when you speed it up.

There's no magic secret or quick fix, just time, patience, dedication and practising correctly.

Self taught you say? Good for you, nothing wrong with that at all. However, don't underestimate the value of some lessons with a good teacher though. Having someone stand over you and giving advice, guidance and correcting mistakes as they occur is highly beneficial. Worth consideration.
 

Volentry

Senior Member
Self taught you say? Good for you, nothing wrong with that at all. However, don't underestimate the value of some lessons with a good teacher though. Having someone stand over you and giving advice, guidance and correcting mistakes as they occur is highly beneficial. Worth consideration.
It's also important to have a good technique. With the right technique it's easier to execute faster/cleaner rolls.
 
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