Drummers who prefer 8 lug snare drums

alparrott

Platinum Member
I will play a snare that sounds good and is easy to tune and keep in tune. I feel like those qualities don't hinge on number of lugs but more on quality of construction overall.
 

beatdat

Senior Member
I like 8 lug snares just for the look of them.

I like the look of them on 20” kicks, too.
 

bongoman

Junior Member
I prefer 8 lugs because I can tune lower with less chance of any of the rods getting too loose. More tension distributed per rod.

I understand the idea of a more “open” sound vs focus from 10 lugs, but I am not yet convinced that is verifiably true. Might just be expectation bias.

People compare eg Acros to Supras, but the chrome plating might make the difference instead. Or maybe it’s both cumulatively.
 

dwsabianguy

Senior Member
The snares I have in my collection, I have because I love the way they sound and feel. The number of lugs is just one of those factors.

My two Dunnetts, my one George Way, my Radio King... they all have eight lugs, and I wouldn't change that for the world.

My Ludwigs, DWs, Sonors... they have ten, and I wouldn't change them either.

An 8-lug Black Beauty is more open and toneful than a 10 lugger, but the 10 lugger is more defined and simply has "that" sound.
 

TK-421

Senior Member
I find 8-lug snares easier to tune evenly all the way around the head. I always strive for perfectly even tension all the way around, yet with 10-lug snares there always seem to be 2 lugs (usually directly across from each other) that just won’t get in tune. Eventually when the head fully seats after a few days, I can get it perfectly tuned. But I’ve never had this problem on my 8-lug snares.
 

Iristone

Regular Poster
I like the ease of tuning of the 8-luggers too, but ultimately it depends on the price to get the same sound for me. Also on vintage 8-lug drums with bent hoops, there's a chance that, at some tuning ranges, two pairs of the lugs have to be tuned way up with the other two pairs all the way loose, in order to get uniform tension across the head. I've got that happening on both of my vintage 8-luggers, but they sound just fine tuned rightly so I'm just leaving them as is.
 

mikyok

Platinum Member
I only have 1 8 lugger and it's my Acrolite Prototype. It's perfect if I want a a bit of dirt in my snare sound at high or low tunings. really comes to life when recording.
 

bongoman

Junior Member
To the tone question, what about 8 high mass lugs vs 10 low mass lugs? That is, if we compare apples to apples as we should, then judging 8 vs 10 makes sense; but not everyone reading a discussion like this will have “apples”.
 
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What qualities make you prefer 8 lug snares ? Feel ? , Sound ? Tuning ?

Thanks

It's just so happens that my favorite snares that I've owned... happened to be less than 10 lugs. That would be: Tama SLP Fat Spruce, '61 Ludwig Acrolite, and early 60s Ludwig Pioneer. That last one only had 6 lugs, it had limited tuning range but it also sounded amazingly open.

Somehow, I've always struggled more with keeping 10 luggers in tune (mostly that one lug when rim shotting). Prevailing theory is that more lugs = less tension on each.
 

pocket player

Junior Member
It's just so happens that my favorite snares that I've owned... happened to be less than 10 lugs. That would be: Tama SLP Fat Spruce, '61 Ludwig Acrolite, and early 60s Ludwig Pioneer. That last one only had 6 lugs, it had limited tuning range but it also sounded amazingly open.

Somehow, I've always struggled more with keeping 10 luggers in tune (mostly that one lug when rim shotting). Prevailing theory is that more lugs = less tension on each.
good info, thanks for your feed back Snick . I do notice the 8 luggers hold their tunning longer than 10 luggers and sound good
 
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