drummer sues to keep his place in the band

DrumEatDrum

Platinum Member
Even if he sues and wins, that's lame. Nothing good can come out of it. It would be like me suing my wife because I don't wanna watch TMZ anymore. I might win, but I'd also be wifeless. Pointless.
Exactly.

I don't see how suing helps. All it does is create more animosity. It seems very counterproductive.
 

DrumEatDrum

Platinum Member
I thought Lombardo was always a hired gun technically. I didn't think he had an equity stake in Slayer as Kramer does w/ Aerosmith (as I understand it).
I'm not sure if Lombardo was always a hired gun, but whatever stake in the band he had (if any) was severed when he and the band separated the 1st time. So when he came back some 10 years later, he likely would have just been a hired gun at that point.
 

MntnMan62

Junior Member
Obviously so much more to this story than was in that article. How did he injure his shoulder? Was he being drunk and stupid and could the entire thing have been avoided, especially in the middle of a major tour? They invited him to rehearse. Why would he decline? The only way the band could possibly demand that he pay for his replacement is if he was somehow responsible for his injury. And adding the word "emotionally" suggests that this is far from just a physical issue. Discord is common in most bands. I'd love to hear what the full story here is. Given the popularity of the band, I'm sure the rest of it will come out.
 

Peedy

Senior Member
Wow, there are SO many examples in this thread of guys who SHOULD have been named Richard.
 

Xstr8edgtnrdrmrX

Well-known member
I have always sort of thought of them as the ultimate "Dad Rock Band"...

this just proves my point (to myself) that it has not really been about the music with these guys since 1976...

...and who really cares...
 

Frank

Gold Member
There's got to be a lot more to this story than what we are seeing. This is nuts.
Absolutely. There Has to be significant backstory to make sense of all of this.

Having said that, I'll throw a stone because I feel like: Aerosmith is irrelevant.
 

Peedy

Senior Member
Absolutely. There Has to be significant backstory to make sense of all of this.

Having said that, I'll throw a stone because I feel like: Aerosmith is irrelevant.
Yeah, while I certainly listened to their early stuff during my HS years (81-85), all they’re later stuff just got shoved into my “poser” category.
Pete
 

ron s

Senior Member
It’s possible that Joey Kramer just got old. Bands know that with a few notable exceptions, drummers are replaceable without losing any ticket sales. Steven Tyler and Joe Perry are the only members that most Aerosmith “fans” can name anyway. Kind of like a quarterback on a football team. Next time you see someone with an NFL team jersey, ask them who plays left guard for the team.

Let’s face it there is technology to cover up a singers lost talent, but drummers need to actually play.

Let’s hear it for bands like Def Leppard and Led Zepplin who opted not to replace the drummer.
Don’t get me going on these old bands touring under the original name- kiss is basically a tribute band lipsyncing with vocal tracks, Grand Funk Railroad threw out Mark Farner and is touring with former Kiss guitarist Bruce Kulick, The Who is half the original band, and on and on. Money to be made, so integrity and camaraderie go right out the window.
 

ron s

Senior Member
I was bummed when Black Sabbath fired Bill Ward, but I’m not crying over this tiff.
Amen to that- I saw Ward play with them around 1996 at the old Boston Garden and he was playing very well. I refused to see Sabbath ( my favorite band) playing with Ozzie’s drummer.
 

cbphoto

Gold Member
Money to be made, so integrity and camaraderie go right out the window.
This is a common behavior in a high-paying gig economy (e.g., Hollywood), which is how many (most?) "pro" musicians live now that royalties are a fraction of what they used to be (does anyone have that data?).
Amen to that- I saw Ward play with them around 1996 at the old Boston Garden and he was playing very well. I refused to see Sabbath ( my favorite band) playing with Ozzie’s drummer.
Yeah, on their album 13, Rick Rubin didn't like Ozzie's go-to guy and managed to get Brad Will in there (who nailed it, IMO), but I guess he doesn't tour with them all the time.
 

DaleClark

Senior Member
Here's another guess. Joey was asked to play to a click (many drummers from that era may find a click quite difficult) to re-audition for the band. Now just think about this. Could some of Stevens vocal be pre recorded and "flown" in at certain times? Maybe the Vegas shows will feature some synced effects, videos, etc. A drummer not great with a click would probably make things a big messy in this situation. Just saying this could be one reason.
 

opentune

Platinum Member
Could some of Stevens vocal be pre recorded and "flown" in at certain times? Maybe the Vegas shows will feature some synced effects, videos, etc.
No doubt, going the route of Kiss and many other legacy acts who cannot cut it anymore (not that Kiss ever could).
As soon as I read or hear about 'tracks' thats it for me. You're not live, not authentic, no interest. I'd rather hear you not hit your high note than hear 'tracks'.
 

ron s

Senior Member
This is a common behavior in a high-paying gig economy (e.g., Hollywood), which is how many (most?) "pro" musicians live now that royalties are a fraction of what they used to be (does anyone have that data?).

Yeah, on their album 13, Rick Rubin didn't like Ozzie's go-to guy and managed to get Brad Will in there (who nailed it, IMO), but I guess he doesn't tour with them all the time.
Tommy Clufetos. Played on the tour. The studio drumming on 13 was very good, but I just didn’t want to see them without Bill Ward. As with Kramer, drummers seem to decline faster then strong instrument players. Or maybe it was about money??
 

cbphoto

Gold Member
Tommy Clufetos. Played on the tour. The studio drumming on 13 was very good, but I just didn’t want to see them without Bill Ward. As with Kramer, drummers seem to decline faster then strong instrument players. Or maybe it was about money??
The removal of Bill Ward really surprised me, and he was treated like any other outside entity: he was given a contract to sign and he declined. We'll never know why he declined, but let's just say it was "creative differences and undervaluing Bill's assets". More info here.
 
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