DRUM TECHNIQUE

GOOSE72

Well-known member
After much consideration I ordered some books to help me. Stick control, Jim Chapin's book, International Drum Rudiments, The New Breed, SYNCOPATION. I'm confused not all drummers agree on how to drum. The number one thing I got out of all these books is they are selling books. Can't even agree on how to hold a stick. To me playing the drums is being free to play how YOU want to play. Some may disagree.
 

C.M. Jones

Well-known member
Technique is as varied as human height. Treat all you observe in the world of drumming as an option, not as a law. Exposing yourself to different methodologies doesn't mean you have to make use of them. Take the best of what you encounter and incorporate it in your own playing, realizing that "best" is a matter of bias.
 

beatdat

Senior Member
What did you think those books would help you with? If you're looking to figure out how to hold the sticks, there are probably better suited resources.

You seem frustrated. Care to let us know what the issue is, specifically?
 

MrInsanePolack

Platinum Member
After much consideration I ordered some books to help me. Stick control, Jim Chapin's book, International Drum Rudiments, The New Breed, SYNCOPATION. I'm confused not all drummers agree on how to drum. The number one thing I got out of all these books is they are selling books. Can't even agree on how to hold a stick. To me playing the drums is being free to play how YOU want to play. Some may disagree.
I think you are misinterpreting the point of the books. None of these are going to give you a definitive answer about anything. They present to you new ideas, you can use them or not.

Rudiments for example, they allow you to develop freedom between the hands. You dont have to learn them. They arent like scales and chords, they are just exercises that free up the hands. That's it.

There is no magic button, the answer does not exist. It's just like the old expression, theres more than one way to skin a cat. Well, theres more than one way to hit a drum also.
 

Odd-Arne Oseberg

Platinum Member
Those are universal books for several different things.

Choice of technique is pretty irrelevant as those books have no real prefernce.


Stick control: Beginning collection of exercise, stickings and rudiments

Jim Chapin's book: Jazz independence

International Drum Rudiments: Speaks for itself

The New Breed: 8th 16th note base pop/rock independence,

SYNCOPATION: Beginner reading and versatile reading pages popular to use for independence, accents etc..

Why would they be the same?

Did you know what you were getting?

Most of those books offer limited value without some guidance.

If you talk bit about what you know and what you're looking to be able to do, some appropriate recommendations for materials would be easier to suggest.
 

nolibos

Well-known member
I can't imagine learning technique from a book; that is what a teacher is for.
Stick Control and Ted Reed's Syncopation are two books for the desert island. I have been using both for thirty plus years. Always hearing about new application(especially on this forum).
Don't Goodwill the books, take them to your local middle or high school.
 

AzHeat

Platinum Member
The problem I have with learning out of books is the disconnect between the author and our reality. I could read about moeller method all day long, but transferring that to a pad was not that easy. Watched YouTube videos on the method. Tough to tell who's got the right technique, so not totally cut and dry. Still, you then ask why the heck can I not go faster than 60bpm.....I must suck! The reality is, it's just not that easy. I've been working on getting my left had triplets up to my right hand speed for over a year. I'm finally getting to a useable speed on the left. It finally sounds sorta fluid. It's finally showing up in my playing. You can't get that out of a book necessarily.

Same with my foot technique. Anyone who tries to follow my knee, when watching from the front is quickly confused. I use a combination of heel up and down technique which works for me, but I suck at slide technique. What I do works and my right foot is way faster than I need most of the time. My technique likely won't work for far too many others.

I say take what you read in books and videos, realize it's coming from an expert, slow it way down and sit there till it begins to sound natural. Then add bpm's till you get to where you want to be, but also realize, there's a limit to speed usefulness. If you're not playing speed metal, there's no need to practice to 1000bpm. Mostly, don't forget the fun factor. No fun just sitting at 50bpm on an exercise all day, when the book says play to 150. I give most of my exercises 5 to 10 minutes a day max for a total of around 30 minutes. I then move to the kit and have fun for the next 40 minutes. The fun just drains otherwise.
 

GOOSE72

Well-known member
I'm not a troll and I'm not frustrated. I decided to keep the books and take everyones advice and study and try new things. I appreciate all the input this is a great website full of knowledge. Thanks to everyone.
 

nolibos

Well-known member
remember, you may only take tid bits from each book. You don't need to work them cover to cover. For example I have only ever used the two pages of stickings at the beginning ofStick Control and i only use the melody pages in Syncopation.
 

beyondbetrayal

Platinum Member
There are many ways to accomplish things, but some work better than others. Some work better for some people than others. Take traditional, french, German, american grips for example. There is no wrong grip. I can see guys who shred in every one. I'll tell you that one works best for me, but I do think TRYING all 4 would be good, but learning 4 at 25% would be a mistake. Pick your favorite and go with it. I feel this way for most "technique" topics. Try them, but go either all in, or try something else.

When it comes to things like syncopation, rudiments, and such, there is only one way to play them as written, but you can do a million things with a para diddle. so learning the repetition should be the same for everyone, but then you make it your own at some point.

There isn't enough time to learn it ALL, but get the basics down and tailor it for your playing. D
 

C.M. Jones

Well-known member
That’s something I’ve been considering recently
Furthermore, there's no need to learn it all. Every field has specialists. Doctors, engineers, and scientists all choose concentrations and devote their careers to them. Why should drummers be any different? Multitasking, even when it's intradisciplinary, usually leads to ADD, not to excellence. Do what you do well and be proud of it. That's always been my approach.
 
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beyondbetrayal

Platinum Member
It's true. Even some of the best drummers of all time would not be the "best" in specific areas where others spend thousands of hours practicing. That is why we have guys who can groove the heaviest pocket, and guys who can blaze chops fast enough to make your head spin.

I do think it is good to get a good foundation, and try a bit of everything at first, if you take the above Dr. analogy, it would be like going to medical school and learning a a bit of everything. Most guys could go out and work at this point. This would be your join a band, play covers at bars etc.

Then you have the Dr.'s that put in the time and become specialists, Thomas Lang didn't get that independence by not putting in THOUSANDS of hours (with a bit of natural gift i'm sure. He might actually be a robot). Eric Moore didn't get those fast linear chops playing slow grooves all day, (This just 2 examples of guys who have specific skill sets and are masters)

The fact is, you CAN'T learn it all. You can become pretty darn good at MOST of it, but you will never be a master in all of it. Once you realize this, you can choose your practice time wisely and work on stuff that fits YOUR goals.

For me, I'll often start off with a few warm ups, then start to mess around with a few beats/grooves/fills and turn it into a bit of a solo.. I'll find something lacking and that will be the beginning of my "practice" I usually practice the things that A- need work, and B- fit what i want and need to learn. Learning some crazy technique, pattern, exercise that is not related to what I intend on playing in the near future is pointless.

Another thing to consider is if you don't play it, you lose it....temporarily. Sure muscle memory is great and you can practice and get it back faster, but stick to techniques and things you use so you can keep it up and you will do much better also.
 
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