DRUM TEACHER! AGH!!!!!

That Guy

Platinum Member
Good point Cory.
I was just thinking, I have been progressing quite fast with my drumming whit the teacher I have now, and I just think, what if I did have a better teacher? Where would I be now?
Sometimes students are forced to be with specific instructors due to geographical location and lack of instructors. You're in an area that is faily dense if I remember correctly. Have you thought about getting another instructor? I would think seriously about it. Your instructors behaviors are not something you have to deal with. It's your money. Use it wisely.
 
L

lewisn27

Guest
Sometimes students are forced to be with specific instructors due to geographical location and lack of instructors. You're in an area that is faily dense if I remember correctly. Have you thought about getting another instructor? I would think seriously about it. Your instructors behaviors are not something you have to deal with. It's your money. Use it wisely.
I am looking for another, I have seen adverts up in the window of the music shop right next to my house and in a newsagents, I was just about to do a search for one actually.
 
L

lewisn27

Guest
I found this Andrew Long guy, £20 for an hour lesson, my current drum teacher charged £17.50, for half an hour (but I got that halfed because I did GCSE music).
This is off Andy's website: "Hello my name is Andrew Long and welcome to my website. I am a professional working musician and drum teacher based in the North East of England. I have just recently graduated from Northumbria University with a BA hons in contemporary music. Prior to this degree I completed a two-year foundation degree in music at Gateshead College, and also a two-year National Diploma course in music practice." His website if you want to check him out for one reason or another: http://www.andrew-long.co.uk/
Seems pretty impressive if you ask me.
 

That Guy

Platinum Member
I am looking for another, I have seen adverts up in the window of the music shop right next to my house and in a newsagents, I was just about to do a search for one actually.

Glad to hear your searching for another one Lewis. If at all possible try to find out about the possible new instructors habits and reputation before setting up an appointment. If you can't get any information just gauge him by his actions. Good luck!
 
L

lewisn27

Guest
Hey this thread fufills one of the pratices or the PEWFLADCC, thread hi-jacking.
 

That Guy

Platinum Member
Hey this thread fufills one of the pratices or the PEWFLADCC, thread hi-jacking.
Technically, we are still on topic. The original poster has recieved answers to his questions and members have added content to the discussion. It's a good thread that should stay on topic and be informative. Of course, we PEWFLADCC members know what type of thread to unleash our fury on.

This one is safe for now :)
 
L

lewisn27

Guest
Technically, we are still on topic. The original poster has recieved answers to his questions and members have added content to the discussion. It's a good thread that should stay on topic and be informative. Of course, we PEWFLADCC members know what type of thread to unleash our fury on.

This one is safe for now :)
Soooooooooo, what about that Neil Peart fella? What do you think of him? lol
 
W

wy yung

Guest
I absoslutly hate my drum teacher He's almost always late and by the time he gets there hes forgotten where weve left off so he pretty much spends half the time get situated and then we have maybe about 10 min. of actually doing something and he ALWAYS goes out of a book!? he has no passion for what he does(that i can see). how important is actually having a drum teacher. is being self taught better anyway?!
This simply is not good enough. There may be other teachers you could seek out. Perhaps call a reputable drum shop in your area.

As for working from a book, I have no problem with that. I use many books in my teaching, from stick control through syncopation to many recent releases.

Good luck with your search. Please do not allow this guy to affect your education and put you off finding a teacher.
 

HeadRush

Senior Member
I don't feel that taking lessons is even really a good idea
maybe to just get you started or teach you technique that won't get you carpal tunnel (like me)
I never took lessons and I feel that has made me a better drummer
I was given a chance to adapt my own style
 

paramac

Member
I don't feel that taking lessons is even really a good idea
maybe to just get you started or teach you technique that won't get you carpal tunnel (like me)
I never took lessons and I feel that has made me a better drummer
I was given a chance to adapt my own style
Maybe if you took lessons you wouldn't of gotten Carpal tunnel.... Taking lessons with a good teacher will only enhance having your own "style" Whether you feel you have your own style is one thing but if other people recognize it's you when hearing you, is probably what determines one having ones own style....Ignorance is bliss
 
Last edited:

That Guy

Platinum Member
I don't feel that taking lessons is even really a good idea
maybe to just get you started or teach you technique that won't get you carpal tunnel (like me)
I never took lessons and I feel that has made me a better drummer
I was given a chance to adapt my own style
Sorry HeadRush but if enough people read that statement you just opened a can of whoop-a** on yourself.

I was self taught for 23 or so years before I took lessons. A year and a half ago I began lessons because I had hit a wall that you eventually will too. Without a solid foundation and understanding of notation you can only go so far. Most self taught drummers will hit a stale point and never progress from there because it's nearly impossible to. In that year and a half that I took those lesssons I learned more about drumming, musicianship, reading, technique and developing style and originality than I ever did in my 23 years flying solo.

Only one who has taken lessons seriously will be able to understand and appreciate the benefits. If you don't, you never will be able to truly appreciate the art.
 

elliotdrummer7227

Senior Member
yes! i aggree with everyone else!
you should look for a better teach!
i have got a really nice teacher! he gives me songs to learn but he also does sight reading !
he does alot of versitilety as well! i like to play hardrock/metal but we are starting reggea and latin!!!!!!!!!!!

by the way if you are in england he teaches in colchester, ipswich and felixstowe!

LINK(look for ashely howard! thats him):http://www.soundattak.co.uk/lounge/tutors.asp
 

Boomka

Platinum Member
Sorry HeadRush but if enough people read that statement you just opened a can of whoop-a** on yourself.

I was self taught for 23 or so years before I took lessons. A year and a half ago I began lessons because I had hit a wall that you eventually will too. Without a solid foundation and understanding of notation you can only go so far. Most self taught drummers will hit a stale point and never progress from there because it's nearly impossible to. In that year and a half that I took those lesssons I learned more about drumming, musicianship, reading, technique and developing style and originality than I ever did in my 23 years flying solo.

Only one who has taken lessons seriously will be able to understand and appreciate the benefits. If you don't, you never will be able to truly appreciate the art.

With a few notable - and impressive - exceptions, the majority of the "greats" and even the "really goods" have studied intensively at some point in their careers, even if it was just to get the foundations of technique and theory down.

Look also at other musical instruments and even other activities like dance, sport, cooking, even art. Think of medicine, piloting, science. More often than not, you'll find those at the top of the game, and among the ranks of working professionals, have had help along the way.
 

Spreggy

Silver Member
Sabian-D, I think the good message here is yes, you should be getting quality product for your cash. Drop him, find another. Part from him in a professional manner, let him know that you're going to try some other teacheers, and you appreciate what he has given you. You may well cross paths again.

Good luck! Teachers are used to having students move around til they find one that clicks.
 
B

Big_Philly

Guest
Well there's no shame in telling him how you feel about his services or lack thereof. He might learn from it. But yeah, definitely get a new teacher.
 

ahriman22

Member
Ugh... I feel your pain. I used to have a teacher like that, he was showing up late, forgetting where we were at and yapping on the phone. Thankfully, my mother (I'm 16), notice how bad I was performing and intially got mad at me, when she noticed that no matter how much I tried, I kept failing she went to the company at complained.

She's a seasoned trombonist who made it to the Montreal conservatory and pretty much knows the who's who in this city (Montreal). Not to mention that she is the one that made my uncles (Drummer and Bassist) slave away on their instruments, which eventually led them to becoming great musicians.

The next class I got a new teacher who was actually good and actually helped me. So far he's been great and I can say I'm a pretty decent drummer at this point.

So what I suggest is that you a) Complain to the company who hired him (If any) or b) Fire him and get a good teacher who will teach you and not leech on your money or time.
 
Top