Drum Slang and Acronyms

JustJames

Platinum Member
Camcoman, if I gave the impression that I was having a dig at you (or that anything was in any way a personal jibe), I apologise. That was not my intention.

I think that this is an interesting idea for a thread, and I was merely intending to narrow (or re-narrow) its focus to drum-specific terminology.
 

camcoman

Senior Member
Camcoman, if I gave the impression that I was having a dig at you (or that anything was in any way a personal jibe), I apologise. That was not my intention.

I think that this is an interesting idea for a thread, and I was merely intending to narrow (or re-narrow) its focus to drum-specific terminology.

No harm, no foul. You might want to re-read my comment prior to that response, which was extremely narrow in its focus on drum specific terminology, specifically drum finishes. There were plenty of comments prior to mine you cold have pointed out. Just sayin'
 

drummaman1

Senior Member
Toms...When I learned to play,they were called mounted or floor toms(because,thats what drum companys called them) ...not rack toms,flying toms,ride toms,high/low toms,tenor toms,timbale toms,bass toms,kick drum toms, or any other name.

Rack tom,was starting to be used because of toms being mounted on drum racks.

To me,a bass drum will ALWAYS be called a bass drum,because that's what it is,and it was NEVER kicked,and always played with a beater.

PFOG is 100% correct....kick drum was a term applied by sound engineers in the 70's,and not by drummers,to the bass drum.

Steve B

Amen about bass drums!! I bristle when they call it a kick...I play the bass drum, if I have to kick it so you can hear it, something is wrong!

We named our cymbals after our slang:

Crash

Splash - not big like a crash, so...a splash

Ride - "riding" rhythms on a cymbal

Pang

Swish

China - because they were brought to the USA by Chinese immigrants who built the railroad 160 or so years ago.

Tubs - one of those slag words for drums used generations ago. I think it was because the drums sounded "tubby"

Being "In the pocket" is not only just keeping steady time. It involves feel just as much as tempo.

There's brand slang: Luddies, Dee-dubs, Yammies, Slingys,

I've heard Hi-hat "barks" by some being called "scoops" a Hi-Hat scoop. Maybe they wanted ice cream or something.

"Bucket of Fish" - telling the drummer what fill you want without mouthing it or writing it out... say it phonetically, it's a four-stroke ruff played snare-tom-floor bass with cymbal

Back in the day, my little brother started on drums before I picked up sticks. I used to watch him practice his lesson. His music reading lessons included words associated with the note groupings:

Mud - quarter note
Hot Dog - eighth notes
Mississippi - sixteenth notes

so, his lessons had phrases of written out music, associating the words with each rhythm:
Mississippi Hot Dog Mississippi Mud Hot Dog Hot Dog Mud
etc etc

27 years later and I still remember that stuff!!!
 

lsits

Gold Member
Doog Doog Doc, Dooga Dooga Dooga Doc Doc.
 

Jeremy Bender

Platinum Member
Amen break - Oversampled drum fill/beat
BB- Black Beauty
BB - Baseball Bat edges
Wrap seam - A problem for drummer's but not audiences
Silver Sealer - Gretsch paint.
CLTF - Cross Laminated Tension Free (Sonor)
P85- Object of scorn.
XVLT - Creative marketing hype.
Monster- An incredibly skilled player on their instrument.
Neighbor- Person who knows my practice schedule.
Girlfriend - Provider of place to play drums or live.
 
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PlayTheSong

Senior Member
Trap set comes from contraption?

I always figured it differently.

Snare drums are called snare drums because they had snare wire strung across the bottom, and a trap is just another word for a snare, so I always thought a trap set came to mean a set of drums that included a snare drum.

Anyone know for sure?
 

drummer-russ

Gold Member
I never heard a snare referred to as a trap. I have heard the contraption origin before.
 

pgm554

Platinum Member
Heard one guy refer to his snare as a fat pillow.
Adjective fits quite well as it felt and sounded like a pillow when played.
 

Yamaha Rider

Gold Member
Toms...When I learned to play,they were called mounted or floor toms(because,thats what drum companys called them) ...not rack toms,flying toms,ride toms,high/low toms,tenor toms,timbale toms,bass toms,kick drum toms, or any other name.

Rack tom,was starting to be used because of toms being mounted on drum racks.

To me,a bass drum will ALWAYS be called a bass drum,because that's what it is,and it was NEVER kicked,and always played with a beater.

PFOG is 100% correct....kick drum was a term applied by sound engineers in the 70's,and not by drummers,to the bass drum.

Steve B
I was always very irritated by 'kick' drum - till I found out (here) that a long long time ago - after marching the bass drum was infact sometimes put on the ground and kicked with the toe so the drummer was free to use his hands elsewhere. (New Orleans funeral bands IIRC...)
 
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Stroman

Platinum Member
Chrome plated wood???
Yeah, Slingerland and Ludwig, and possibly others, used a metal wrap over wood shells. Ludwig even used a chrome wrap over Vistalites.

Crazy, eh?

Hers a pic of some Slingerland in COW, along with copper-over-wood concert toms. Neil Peart's first kit with Rush.
 

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Bozozoid

Gold Member
Jam...whats your favorite?..no..we were JAMMING..what were you jamming?..playing music!. Eating jam while playing music?..honey..nevermind. I'm going to GC to check out some new pies..at GC!?that's not a bakery!.
 
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