Drum shop

SomeBadDrummer

Well-known member
I’m seriously thinking about opening a drum store in Atlanta. If anyone wants to invest or participate let me know. The empire city of the south is in dire need of a real drum shop and there’s literally zero competition of options for professional drummers with a huge amount of serious musicians.
I can snag several well trained employees who have decades of experience in running a store.
PM if interested
 

belairien

Silver Member
I wish I could work there. I'm stuck all the way in Oregon though. Only "drum shop" around here is guitar center, and I use that term begrudgingly. :(
 

C.M. Jones

Well-known member
Such a venture would carry substantial risks. I'm not saying it can't be done, but the amount of capital required to start it, as well as the monetary cushion necessary to withstand hard times, would be considerable. It's tough to envision that brick-and-mortar drum retail will make a roaring comeback. People are growing more content with (or at least more tolerant of) online purchases by the minute, and nothing about the future suggests that in-person commerce will see much of a revival. That's why so many physical stores are closing their doors and shifting to online formats. They reduce operating expenses by doing so, increasing profits and shaving liabilities. Nothing happens in the business world unless it improves the bottom line.
 

MrInsanePolack

Platinum Member
We had a drum shop a few towns over a couple years ago. The dude was more like a collector though. He had tons of cool gear all packed into this tiny store. His prices were kinda high, and was very "low" on his offerings for used gear. His store was only open like 1 day a week also. I'm not sure exactly when it closed, but I often wonder what happened to all the gear.
 

Zaster

Well-known member
I wish I could work there. I'm stuck all the way in Oregon though. Only "drum shop" around here is guitar center, and I use that term begrudgingly. :(
Isn’t Rhythm Traders in Portland? That’s where I got my snare, via Reverb. (Never been there in person though!)
 

C.M. Jones

Well-known member
We had a drum shop a few towns over a couple years ago. The dude was more like a collector though. He had tons of cool gear all packed into this tiny store. His prices were kinda high, and was very "low" on his offerings for used gear. His store was only open like 1 day a week also. I'm not sure exactly when it closed, but I often wonder what happened to all the gear.
Owning a drum shop would be fun were it not for business-related worries. If I had a net worth of, say, fifty-million dollars, I could open a shop without the slightest concern for generating profits. If I made money, fine. If I didn't, no problem. The shop would be more of a recreational pursuit than anything else. I could host clinics, stage other special events, and basically turn the premises into a hangout for drummers of all categories, offering free coffee and so on to players who just wanted to socialize. I mean, I'd already be sinfully wealthy. I wouldn't need to sell anything.
 
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MrInsanePolack

Platinum Member
Owning a drum shop would be fun were it not for business-related worries. If I had a net worth of, say, fifty-million dollars, I'd could open a shop without the slightest concern for generating profits. If I made money, fine. If I didn't, no problem. The shop would be more of a recreational pursuit than anything else. I could host clinics, stage other special events, and basically turn the premises into a hangout for drummers of all categories, offering free coffee and so on to players who just wanted to socialize. I mean, I'd already be sinfully wealthy. I wouldn't need to sell anything.
Like Barnes & Noble but with drums. That would be a cool shop.
 

Ghede

Active member
Owning a drum shop would be fun were it not for business-related worries. If I had a net worth of, say, fifty-million dollars, I'd could open a shop without the slightest concern for generating profits. If I made money, fine. If I didn't, no problem. The shop would be more of a recreational pursuit than anything else. I could host clinics, stage other special events, and basically turn the premises into a hangout for drummers of all categories, offering free coffee and so on to players who just wanted to socialize. I mean, I'd already be sinfully wealthy. I wouldn't need to sell anything.
If you promise to open it in Europe, I'm willing to donate 100€ to your 50-million cause!
I wonder which brand you are going to recommend you customers! :rolleyes:
 

someguy01

Well-known member
I'd probably try and partner with a large online retailer and use the retail space to house items for demo. When it comes to instruments, almost all of us like to try before we buy.
 

belairien

Silver Member
Isn’t Rhythm Traders in Portland? That’s where I got my snare, via Reverb. (Never been there in person though!)
I try and avoid Portland due in part to some reasons that can't be discussed on dw. Every time I go up north, they are very unfriendly to southern Oregonians. Almost got arrested there once for legally exercising a constitutionally protected right, while following all state, county, and city laws.

It sucks because that's where all the good venues are.
 

Lee-Bro

Senior Member
I’m seriously thinking about opening a drum store in Atlanta. If anyone wants to invest or participate let me know. The empire city of the south is in dire need of a real drum shop and there’s literally zero competition of options for professional drummers with a huge amount of serious musicians.
I can snag several well trained employees who have decades of experience in running a store.
PM if interested
Congrat's on your potential new venture!

I considered opening a drum shop several years ago but decided against it due to other obligations.

Drum, cymbal, and some hardware companies have made it a lot easier by allowing rotating inventories or "touring inventories." Essentially they send you a bundle of gear for a scheduled period of time, whatever doesn't sell, goes back to the distributor. You pay for what you sell or want to keep in-store, and then get fresh new inventory sent out when the unsold gear is returned to the dist./manufacturer. There are credit worthiness requirements, not all companies do this, and each that do will have different procedures for it.

Overhead expenses such as retail space can be reduced by working with a local business incubator that has space available. Extensive and cost-laden leases aren't needed nowadays*

If Badges Drum Shop (Mason, OH) and The Cymbal House (Covington, KY) weren't by me, I'd be giving serious reconsideration to opening an instrument shop now. My perspective is that it's a "buyers market" for those looking to lock-in low cost business operations.


*two REITs I work with aren't accepting new money for their Retail space funds due to a glut of it available now.
 

someguy01

Well-known member
I try and avoid Portland due in part to some reasons that can't be discussed on dw. Every time I go up north, they are very unfriendly to southern Oregonians. Almost got arrested there once for legally exercising a constitutionally protected right, while following all state, county, and city laws.

It sucks because that's where all the good venues are.
Being from Baltimore and then moving to Seattle from Houston, I have a pretty good idea what you're referencing. I can concur, and it is rather unfortunate behaviour.
 

belairien

Silver Member
Being from Baltimore and then moving to Seattle from Houston, I have a pretty good idea what you're referencing. I can concur, and it is rather unfortunate behaviour.
Yeah. I do not partake in any of it, but some ex-friends do, so I can't hit the drum store due to threats :(

Back in topic:
If your store goes online, I will order from ya!
 

SomeBadDrummer

Well-known member
I appreciate all of the input! I’ll be looking into the logistics and let you know if/when there’s a DrumDream open for your browsing pleasure. *no stealing my name!
 

SomeBadDrummer

Well-known member
Congrat's on your potential new venture!

I considered opening a drum shop several years ago but decided against it due to other obligations.

Drum, cymbal, and some hardware companies have made it a lot easier by allowing rotating inventories or "touring inventories." Essentially they send you a bundle of gear for a scheduled period of time, whatever doesn't sell, goes back to the distributor. You pay for what you sell or want to keep in-store, and then get fresh new inventory sent out when the unsold gear is returned to the dist./manufacturer. There are credit worthiness requirements, not all companies do this, and each that do will have different procedures for it.

Overhead expenses such as retail space can be reduced by working with a local business incubator that has space available. Extensive and cost-laden leases aren't needed nowadays*

If Badges Drum Shop (Mason, OH) and The Cymbal House (Covington, KY) weren't by me, I'd be giving serious reconsideration to opening an instrument shop now. My perspective is that it's a "buyers market" for those looking to lock-in low cost business operations.


*two REITs I work with aren't accepting new money for their Retail space funds due to a glut of it available now.
Thanks I know it’s not an easy proposition. As they say “if were easy everyone would do it “. I’m really thinking about doing something because I love it and not because it makes sense from a big corporate standpoint. Atlanta has a big music and movie industry, pinewood studios atlanta is enormous, second only to Hollywood in the us.
EDIT: Pinewood Studios (UK) sold their stake in the Atlanta location, and it is now Trilith: https://thecitizen.com/2020/10/07/fayettevilles-pinewood-atlanta-studios-and-pinewood-forest-have-a-new-name-trilith/
 
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