DRUM SHELLS: Ply/Solid/Stave

Push pull stroke

Platinum Member
I asked that this thread was re-opened so that we could hear balanced views that were not biased towards Guru.

To be fair to this thread, I think it would do better if you didn't chime in on this one because your opinions are the ones that are everywhere.

We need some opinions that are not from someone using this forum to sell his drums.

But you've just gone and sh@t all over it, thanks for that *rolleyes*
Is something really bad happening in your life? Andy is one of the nicest and most knowledgeable people on this forum. His kits sound amazing. His isolation mounts are genius. You have absolutely no excuse to act this way.
 

mmulcahy1

Platinum Member
1. JohnoWorld, pull your foot out of your mouth.
2. Andy, respond away... you're the largest font of knowledge this joint has.
3. Everyone else, carry on.
 

Captain Bash

Silver Member
I own and regularly interchange my set up between a maple ply kit (Yamaha, MCA) and a maple stave (Gary Noonan) depending on gig. I use the ply kit if I want a neutral sound and require a tone that is broad but rather undefined.

Conversely the stave kit excells where tonal character is required and clarity is desired. The stave kit has a shorter note length as compared to the ply,
But for me this shorter note is an advantage as I don’t have to apply dampening tape or moon gels to toms.

One important thing is that the stave kit has a much broader tuning range and sounds good to me and others at every tension. In contrast every ply kit I have ever played (Ludwig, Gretsch, DW, Premier, Pearl etc ) all have just one, two or if you are lucky three tuning sweet spots.

There is no better or worse just different. In most situations I take the stave kit simply because it’s more fun to play.
 

R2112

Silver Member
I own and regularly interchange my set up between a maple ply kit (Yamaha, MCA) and a maple stave (Gary Noonan) depending on gig. I use the ply kit if I want a neutral sound and require a tone that is broad but rather undefined.

Conversely the stave kit excells where tonal character is required and clarity is desired. The stave kit has a shorter note length as compared to the ply,
But for me this shorter note is an advantage as I don’t have to apply dampening tape or moon gels to toms.

One important thing is that the stave kit has a much broader tuning range and sounds good to me and others at every tension. In contrast every ply kit I have ever played (Ludwig, Gretsch, DW, Premier, Pearl etc ) all have just one, two or if you are lucky three tuning sweet spots.

There is no better or worse just different. In most situations I take the stave kit simply because it’s more fun to play.
These have been my observations as well with the difference between stave and ply. Those are two nice kits you mentioned. I've always wanted to play a Noonan kit. Not very many around my neck of the woods. I've seen videos of Ash Soan playing his 12x7 Purpleheart Noonan snare. That snare always sounds amazing!
 

PHIL2016

Senior Member
Well, judging from the responses, i got a good idea of what to expect, I have an old oak stave shell snare drum coming my way shortly, the snares that Chris Brady used to make gives me sort of an idea as to how it will sound as well, thanks for the input, the responses have been both entertaining and informative, this will be my first experience in owing such a drum!
 

Jeff Almeyda

Senior Consultant
I asked that this thread was re-opened so that we could hear balanced views that were not biased towards Guru.

To be fair to this thread, I think it would do better if you didn't chime in on this one because your opinions are the ones that are everywhere.

We need some opinions that are not from someone using this forum to sell his drums.

But you've just gone and sh@t all over it, thanks for that *rolleyes*
From this post alone, i can tell that you're a second or third rate drummer. Andy is one of the reasons I still visit this place.

Andy's opinions are everywhere? I've been playing drums in NY on a pro level for 25 years. Andy has done more actual time studying the factors that affect drum sound than anyone at the big name companies. The fact that he shares the info with us is one of the reasons that I still visit this forum and also convinced me to buy a Guru kit.

You sound like a dumb kid or a miserable 40 year old.
 

steadypocket

Gold Member
I asked that this thread was re-opened so that we could hear balanced views that were not biased towards Guru.

To be fair to this thread, I think it would do better if you didn't chime in on this one because your opinions are the ones that are everywhere.

We need some opinions that are not from someone using this forum to sell his drums.

But you've just gone and sh@t all over it, thanks for that *rolleyes*
Next time you accuse a DW member for using the forum to sell drums, at least choose a post that can be viewed as one that would at least support your claim. I reviewed Andy’s post and it wasn’t anything close to marketing.
 

Groov-E

Silver Member
Thank you Andy for sharing your knowledge on this forum.

This one opinion everyone has shut down is but one miserable comment in a sea of peace and goodwill (as so often expressed here).

I know you have the faculty to do this exercice on your own seeing all the respect you get from others on this very thread, but I just wanted to say it out loud one more time.

Thanks.
 

BertTheDrummer

Gold Member
Modern drummer recently did a couple things on this subject an article by Russ Miller and a podcast episode (117) touched on this subject. Worth a look and listen if your interested.

Disclaimer: I'm not at all affiliated with them, just recently listened to the episode.
 
Top