Drum Rack

Drum4Jesus

Member
Hi DrummerWorld!
I posted this question in another area but I think it was the wrong place.
Who here owns a drum rack for an acoustic drum kit? Is it easier to have more cymbals?
Thanks!
 

bermuda

Drummerworld Pro Drummer - Administrator
Staff member
I use rack on the road because 1) it ensures a consistent, speedy set-up night after night, and 2) it involves far less hardware than the comparable number of cymbal & mic stands that it replaces.

So the answer is, the rack should be considered for its ease of use. If you use a 4pc kit with a kick-mounted tom, 2 or 3 cymbals, and no mics, a rack is probably heavier and more of a hassle than going with the few stands involved.

Bermuda
 

AzHeat

Platinum Member
If the rack is for you, it should make life simpler, when transporting multiple toms and cymbals. What's an absolute nightmare though, is sharing a kit with a rack.
 

lefty2

Platinum Member
I don't have one anymore, but one thing I remember that was cool. When we played with multiple bands. I could set up off stage, and when it was time to go on, we could have my drums up there set up completely in no time.
 

alparrott

Platinum Member
At one point I owned a rack for a very large drumset. I was much younger. Basically I had to appear up to an hour before anyone else to start packing in my drumset. I could scarcely fit everything in my car. It was almost certainly the major contributing factor to my lower back issues.

I have gone down to a four-piece with stands.

If you are never, ever going to move your drumset, or someone is always going to move it for you, great. If you don't fit into either of those categories, I would say that it's just not that practical.
 

Galaxy

Senior Member
I use a Gibraltar double bass rack with a 5-piece. It may seem excessive,and it is, but that it how I like to do things,haha. 12"and 13" rack toms offset in the center. I have 3 crashes,a ride,and splash mounted to the rack but I have 2 chinas and a ride still on stands. I would like to get the side extension to hold the 2 chinas on the right and one day find an 18" floor tom to go next to the 16" and mount those to the side.

For over a year I moved this set to practice and back every Friday and found it to be much easier than separate stands. I am super OCD about locations of things and the rack put an end to constant tweaking and moving of stands. I have more usable floor space with the rack kit than my same size kit with stands.

I had to buy a bag to hold the rack tubes and feet but it does not hold all the boom arms. Those I clamp to a short rack tube and move as one piece.

This is the rack...

http://www.guitarcenter.com/Gibraltar/GRS-850DBL-Road-Series-Curved-Double-Bass-Drum-Rack-1273887992839.gc?cntry=us&source=4WWRWXGP&gclid=CjwKEAjwj6PKBRCAy9-07PeTtGgSJAC1P9xGUmqYYOnjwC6LkkVZPI7zH9OE0Aw0gILHyykCmQARChoCNxfw_wcB&kwid=productads-adid^76729338762-device^c-plaid^182268540987-sku^1273887992839@ADL4GC-adType^PLA
 

PorkPieGuy

Platinum Member
I guess it depends on how big your set is.

I'd personally not suggest it until you are doing at least three rack toms and you have quite a few cymbals.

I don't know a ton of drummers, but every one of them who has used a rack ended up selling it because it was too much of a hassle.

However, if you like the way it looks and/or think it may help, go for it! I suggest buying used.
 

bermuda

Drummerworld Pro Drummer - Administrator
Staff member
Is it easier to have more cymbals?
The answer to that specific question is, yes.

This is my touring kit, and the rack has made it easy to arrange 5 cymbals, a sample pad, 5 mics, and 3 toms, with room for even more clamps/arms as needed. If everything on the rack was on floor stands instead, there'd be a LOT more hardware competing for space, and adding more pieces would be tricky.

Bermuda
 

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resunoiz

Senior Member
bigger the set, easiest to fit cymbals/shells exprecially without the bass drum constraints.

for smaller drumsets is almost useless.

have it from more than 20 years, very useful if I set-up my entire drumset (2 bass drums-3toms-floor tom-6 cymbals). If I use my actual drumset that is 1 bass drum-1 or max 2 tom-floor tom-3cymbal is only more hardware to carry on.

it depends.
 

hippy chip

Silver Member
I'm in the "depends on the kit" group. A rack would be overkill for my basic setup---and I'm getting too old to haul around a bunch of extra hardware that I don't really need! 2 light weight cymbal stands, and a Gibraltar grabber clamp gives me 3 cymbals without breaking my back :)
 

whiteknightx

Silver Member
stealth racks.jpg
stealthrack side view.jpg

Here's my kit with stealth racks. I really like them. They cut down on the footprint, they are stable, and I'm carrying less metal. My side rack has the ride, 2 crashes, and a 14 and 16 suspended toms on it.
 

Macarina

Silver Member
I love the stealth rack solutions. I was really wanting to go the stealth direction for my A2E conversion, but with the massive amount of cables, I need the rack to control the cables.

That looks reaaaaaaaly nice.
 

AzHeat

Platinum Member
Re: Very Curious!

It depends on the rack. If it has wing attachments, then yes, if not then maybe? Depends on the setup. So far the biggest b befits I've seen to racks, is the ability to have one rack tom directly over the BD, and to ease setup, so long as you have the right rack. Round tubes that don't have a memory lock of sorts will not setup as easily as say a Yamaha hex rack. Just the slightest twist and things are way off. Getting a ride cymbal super low can be a pain, if you're rack is in the way of where you want it too, so not necessarily easier.

When buying a rack you have to really think about how you will be setting things up, before you buy. That extra $100 or $200 up from may be the difference between a useable rack and one that gets sold.
 

larryace

"Uncle Larry"
I could never get past the look. That said, the stealth racks are the best looking ones. The rack going across the bass drum kind of ruins what I want to see. Other than that I like the concept, the consistency of setup.

Jon, with Al I am assuming you have roadies who set the kit up all the way, down to the micro adjustments. Is that the way it is, you just show up to soundcheck/play? If so, envious! I'm also curious if you personally have to deal with the union for every different city, or is that taken care of?

(Dream of mine, the roadie thing.)
 

markdrum

Silver Member
On the Pearl and Gibraltar racks you can also use the rack boom attachments that fit over the down tubes. They allow you to mount cymbal or mic arms without having to use the usual clamp(s). It can save you a lot of heavy lifting. I use the RBAs on the two front tubes and the back right one. I've got crashes mounted via Pearl boom arms on the front two tubes and a china on the back right one. That's three clamps that I don't have to pack. That's a great Ayotte kit there! Is that the "DrumSmith" one?
 

sticksnstonesrus

Silver Member
Had a 5 piece on a three-sided PDP/Gibraltar rack with 8 cymbals and no-leg hi-hat stand fitted in. Loved the smaller footprint. Loved the ability to add lots of accessories and when the venues had enough space to pre-setup, all it took was a couple people to pick the whole thing up onto a riser. Quick cymbal toppers make it even faster.

My only complaints were about the awkward size of the tubes - makes it interesting to pack up and transport if you don't have cases... and the fact that you can't you can't exactly back the rack down to a lighter session rig. For instance, if I only wanted to use a snare, bass drum, floor tom, hi-hat and two cymbals...the mounts for everything else are still there unless you buy additional single stands/legs to make it happen without the rack.

My last home move...I went back to single stands and a 2-accessory+double tom stand for the floor toms. Some of the single stands have single-peg mounts now and work great for the up-tom (which I managed to find one used). Same kit. Different hardware and a couple different crashes.

F0F423FD-1207-4F85-B3EB-7C9F1AE1BC83.jpeg

CF63C174-7EFD-49AE-B5A0-1BE789337764.jpeg

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A3F37C8F-4263-48A8-865D-D7599724C150.jpeg
 
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bermuda

Drummerworld Pro Drummer - Administrator
Staff member
Jon, with Al I am assuming you have roadies who set the kit up all the way, down to the micro adjustments. Is that the way it is, you just show up to soundcheck/play? If so, envious! I'm also curious if you personally have to deal with the union for every different city, or is that taken care of?

(Dream of mine, the roadie thing.)
The hardware is completely memory-clamped and marked, and the rug is spiked (marked) so that the few things that touch the floor are positioned consistently. I have also removed all non-essential wing nuts and replaced them with hex nuts, so that nothing can be loosened for convenience, or readjusted (without some effort.) Short of someone's inability to read and match-up numbers, the setup is foolproof.

So, to answer the question, anybody can set-up the kit. Sometimes it's our stage manager, sometimes it's someone on the local crew. They literally need to be able to read numbers, and rotate the hardware so that the memory clamp 'locks' into place.

There are both union and non-union houses. In the bigger cities, the venues tend to be union, and how strict they are depends somewhat on the local crew's age (older hardcore union guys can be tough) and how well our crew interfaces with them at the start of their day. There have been very few issues over the 35 years we've been touring.

But union or not, it's rare that I handle my gear prior to the show, and I do enjoy the luxury of walking away from everything at the end of the show. :)

There is an exception to all of this however, and it points up a huge advantage of using a rack.

When we're playing outside of N America, I use a backline kit with 6 cymbal stands. Every day, I have to set-up the drums and place the stands exactly where they need to be. Even with boom arms, this means crossing their bases. Even with a rug, I still have to set up everything, because the stands are broken down after each gig, and I have to readjust them every day. Sure I mark them with a Sharpie™ and tape, but it still requires my personal touch to make sure every cymbal sits just right.

My involvement also means I need to be at the venue earlier in the day, because the mics can't be set-up until I've finished doing the entire kit. So when I'm asked if I get to do any sightseeing while in Europe or Australia, on a show day, the answer is no.

Hmmm, next time, I'll see if I can get a rack!

Bermuda
 

Up2Speed

Senior Member
The hardware is completely memory-clamped and marked, and the rug is spiked (marked) so that the few things that touch the floor are positioned consistently. I have also removed all non-essential wing nuts and replaced them with hex nuts, so that nothing can be loosened for convenience, or readjusted (without some effort.) Short of someone's inability to read and match-up numbers, the setup is foolproof.

So, to answer the question, anybody can set-up the kit. Sometimes it's our stage manager, sometimes it's someone on the local crew. They literally need to be able to read numbers, and rotate the hardware so that the memory clamp 'locks' into place.

There are both union and non-union houses. In the bigger cities, the venues tend to be union, and how strict they are depends somewhat on the local crew's age (older hardcore union guys can be tough) and how well our crew interfaces with them at the start of their day. There have been very few issues over the 35 years we've been touring.

But union or not, it's rare that I handle my gear prior to the show, and I do enjoy the luxury of walking away from everything at the end of the show. :)

There is an exception to all of this however, and it points up a huge advantage of using a rack.

When we're playing outside of N America, I use a backline kit with 6 cymbal stands. Every day, I have to set-up the drums and place the stands exactly where they need to be. Even with boom arms, this means crossing their bases. Even with a rug, I still have to set up everything, because the stands are broken down after each gig, and I have to readjust them every day. Sure I mark them with a Sharpie™ and tape, but it still requires my personal touch to make sure every cymbal sits just right.

My involvement also means I need to be at the venue earlier in the day, because the mics can't be set-up until I've finished doing the entire kit. So when I'm asked if I get to do any sightseeing while in Europe or Australia, on a show day, the answer is no.

Hmmm, next time, I'll see if I can get a rack!

Bermuda
Why haven't you used a rack in those situations?
 
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