Drum Pads

cbphoto

Gold Member
What drum pads are members using, and what do they like or dislike about them?

I have an HQ Real Feel and don’t like the bouncy rubber nor the hard rubber as all I do is work on ergonomics, not chops.

I bought a Remo silent pad but it’s bouncy feel made me stash it in the pile going to Goodwill.

Before I spend another dollar, I’d like to read what others like and dislike about their pads.
 

vtran711

Active member
I don't think you need to purchase anything else. I too have a Real Feel and often times I'll place a blanket or small pillow on it for less bounce to work my hands and wrist. The thicker and softer the material the more of a workout. No matter what I use I always practice with a metronome.
 

Xstr8edgtnrdrmrX

Well-known member
my main pad is an Off World Invader V3, (from when he was making them in his garage) but I also use a Vic Firth Slimpad in my back pack because it is so light.

I probably own one of every kind of pad ever made since 1976ish except anything from Xymox
 

beatdat

Senior Member
I was using various pads (eg. Remo, Vic Firth, RTOM, etc.) for awhile.

Six months ago, on beyondbetrayal's recommendation, I picked up a Prologix Blue Lightning pad - and there's been no looking back.

It's a moderate workout (less bounce than any other pad except for the RTOM), but has an absolutely great feel and sound. On the occasion that I have lessons at my home and not at my rehearsal space, the first thing my teacher does when he comes in is sit behind it and start playing - it puts a smile on his face every time.

One quibble, though, is that it is not as quiet as I was hoping; sure, it's quieter than the Remo and Vic Firth pads, but not as quiet as the RTOm pad (which I could play anytime of night and not disturb anyone who was sleeping).

And, this pad will highlight poor technique, especially if you grip the sticks too tightly - it will, in fact, hurt a bit, so I imagine it could cause some damage over time if your technique is not up to par - it's definitely not for beginners. But, if you know what you're doing and want something that will make your wrists and fingers work just a bit harder than most pads (and not have the pad do the work for you), I can't recommend it enough.
 

cbphoto

Gold Member
I’m not clear on differences between the Prologix models. Isn’t “red” supposed to be the least bouncy?
 
A few years ago, I've bought a second hand Sabian Quiet Tone to try it and I like it - they come up on ebay every once in a while. I had a two-sided Real Feel before. Pros and Cons compared to the Real Feel:
+ Feels close to a snare with the adjustable tension, so you practice what you'll eventually want to do on the set. Some people might like more extreme surfaces to develop different motions but to me it's a plus that it's rather realistic
+ Brushes
+ You can put it on your snare and it sounds alright
+ There's a rim (another benefit: you have a place where you can put your sticks after practicing without having them roll away ;))
- Pretty loud when hit hard
- Large and bulky
- Expensive when bought new
 

Xstr8edgtnrdrmrX

Well-known member
A few years ago, I've bought a second hand Sabian Quiet Tone to try it and I like it - they come up on ebay every once in a while. I had a two-sided Real Feel before. Pros and Cons compared to the Real Feel:
+ Feels close to a snare with the adjustable tension, so you practice what you'll eventually want to do on the set. Some people might like more extreme surfaces to develop different motions but to me it's a plus that it's rather realistic
+ Brushes
+ You can put it on your snare and it sounds alright
+ There's a rim (another benefit: you have a place where you can put your sticks after practicing without having them roll away ;))
- Pretty loud when hit hard
- Large and bulky
- Expensive when bought new
my step son just got one of these, and it feels great!! But the cons you mentioned would prevent me from getting one...

I just use his when he is at "real dads" house
 

Juniper

Gold Member
I use an Evans Real Feel.

Yet to find a completely realistic pad in all my years but I'm happy enough with it. It does it's job well enough.
 

beyondbetrayal

Platinum Member
Evens Real Feel is like playing on a coffee table. (I own one), as is the billy Hyde.

I have WAY to many pads, but as someone who likes to work on fingers, wrists, chops, rudiments, speed, control I really like to play on multiple surfaces.

My 2 favorites are the Prologix Blue lightning. It is the most all around pad I have used. Feels like playing on a racktom almost. there is a BIT of rebound, but you really have to work for speed and consistency. I can feel the burn using this, and I don't jar my wrists and fingers. It feels great and it is QUIET!!!!

My other favorite is the Moongel workout pad. The thing is darn near silent. Quietest pad I have played. I personally LOVE it as it has made my control and consistency much better. The only thing is there is ZERO rebound. A lot of people don't like this pad as it feels SO dead. It is like playing on a huge floor tom that is tuned as low as possible. Doubles are a challenge when you start with this pad. If I only play on it my speed tends to drop, but my double strokes have improved and so has my technique.

I tend to alternate between those 2 the most. Once in a while a harder surface isn't the worst. I'd say keep the real feel and grab one of those based on your needs. I like to set up 2 or 3 beside each other when I practice as cymbals, toms, snare all feel much different than each other. It's nice to be able to do consistent rolls around the kit.
 

Odd-Arne Oseberg

Platinum Member
I have more pads than I want to admit. Many of them are rubber and I'm not really a fan of any of those either.

I definetly think your pad matters, especially if you're using it a lot. It's worth the investment.

My main pad for the last few years has been a Xymox laminate pad. Not by any means as loud as the old Remos, but it's not quiet either.

For less rebound I have the newer 7" RTOMs. With their own small Evans pad stand they're easy to transport and easy to quickly position anywhere you want on a practice kit. I have 4 of those.

For brush work I have the Remo Brush-Up pad. Easy to make something like that yourself, but it probably won't be as light weight.

I have the Reflexx pad as well. The best thing about that one to me is really how quiet it is and serves well as a warm-up surface at a gig etc... It works as intended to be a middle of the road thing, but I'm not really sure how useful I find that to be.
 
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