Drum Pad & Drum Lessons (How much is too much!)

DrumNut!

Well-known member
Hi Everyone,
I’m confused…Been playing roughly 4-5 years some lessons, more self taught….I haven’t found the right teacher for a variety of reasons…but I’ve been currently working with someone (about 3-4 months)…My problem is I’m getting bored.
He mostly works out of Stick Control and Syncopation, no problem with me but he spends 90% on the pad.
I spoke up and we now work out of Jim Chapins Techique Book, Carmines book for a rock brush up… but this is 10% of the lesson. He sits behind me when I play and will jump in and play when I screw up something.
He really doesn’t do much drum set- no new beats, fills, copy cat, playing to music. He only has one drum set…
I like him, but he’s got some issues…
I notice my hand technique is better, but no work yet on foot technique, etc. He showed me on the pad many key rudiments,then he would play them back to me on his drum set to show me applications.. but he doesn’t let me do it on the set? Is this just old school? I respect him because he has worked with a couple of renowned teachers. He mostly teaches high school students snare drum.. but he does teach drum set.
I’m confused, I’m not really having fun, he’s patient but doesn’t give you a road map. He just tells me to Slow Down, drumming is a process… Id like to hear your thoughts or advice!
Thanks guys and girls!
I’m new. I’m sure drum lesson threads are common. My apologies if this was not the right discussion thread!
 
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Odd-Arne Oseberg

Platinum Member
Sounds like he has a very shallow base to teach from.

The teacher's mentality IMO should definetly be to get the basics in, but it should be done holistically and in a way that works for the student and fills in all types of holes at the same time.

There should be a pretty good reason to not teach kit and styles along with everything else. Those reasons would really only be things like the student doesn't have a kit or he/she themself wants to only focus on pad stuff.

If there's a need to change a students perspective it's incredibly important to explain why that's done and share the philosophy.
 
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DrumNut!

Well-known member
Wow. I appreciate your insight. I’m with you. It’s strange. I don’t feel like I’m getting an honest drum lesson…perhaps he is working from a shallow base. It’s hard to find a good teacher. But that’s the journey of learning.
Thanks again. Good luck to you!
 

No Way Jose

Silver Member
He does not sound like a good match for you.

You might imagine what you want to accomplish, then figure out how you are going to make that happen.
 

DrumNut!

Well-known member
I agree Amigo. He’s not a good fit…he means well, my hand technique improved and I read better, but there’s no musicality here. And yes!
I should think more of what I want to accomplish and take the right steps. Thanks for the advice!
 

Super Phil

Senior Member
Sounds like he would be a good teacher for someone who wanted to get into drum line, etc, but that's probably not you. Drums are a musical instrument, so I would imagine most people who decide to play them want to do just that...make music. I try to get students playing along to songs as soon as possible. That way instead of tapping on a pad they are playing music right away and excited about it.
Of course there is a time and place for pad practice/study to work on technique, practice quietly, etc, but I know I wouldn't be interested in doing that 90% of the time... and neither are you. I would probably look into finding a new teacher who fits better with what you're looking to do.
 

DrumNut!

Well-known member
Sounds like he would be a good teacher for someone who wanted to get into drum line, etc, but that's probably not you. Drums are a musical instrument, so I would imagine most people who decide to play them want to do just that...make music. I try to get students playing along to songs as soon as possible. That way instead of tapping on a pad they are playing music right away and excited about it.
Of course there is a time and place for pad practice/study to work on technique, practice quietly, etc, but I know I wouldn't be interested in doing that 90% of the time... and neither are you. I would probably look into finding a new teacher who fits better with what you're looking to do.
Ha. Yeah, The Drum
Sounds like he would be a good teacher for someone who wanted to get into drum line, etc, but that's probably not you. Drums are a musical instrument, so I would imagine most people who decide to play them want to do just that...make music. I try to get students playing along to songs as soon as possible. That way instead of tapping on a pad they are playing music right away and excited about it.
Of course there is a time and place for pad practice/study to work on technique, practice quietly, etc, but I know I wouldn't be interested in doing that 90% of the time... and neither are you. I would probably look into finding a new teacher who fits better with what you're looking to do.
Simply put…that’s what I thought. We weren’t making any music, strange. At our last lesson I caught him checking his messages while I was playing a jazz exercise. Lol! He’s got issues, for sure. I know his personal life isn’t going well because he told me…but, I’m paying him to learn and enjoy myself and that’s not happening!
Appreciate your input!
 
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JDFaulky

Well-known member
This guy sounds very similar to the previous drum teacher I worked with. I worked with him for 5 months and he did a lot of similar things. I felt like I didn’t even really learn anything from him in those 5 months and it was a massive waste of time and money.

I fired him and changed teachers and now I’m working with a teacher who’s excellent. I’ve only been working with the new teacher for a month and he already corrected my poor double stroke roll, my crappy left foot independence on the hi-hats, and my improper closed hi-hat sticking. All things I brought up to my old teacher which he just ignored for 5 months and the new guy helped me correct in one month.

If there are red flags then drop him. Don’t be like me and waste your time and money on a teacher who’s teaching style isn’t working for you or giving you the results you need. Just imagine how much better I would be now if I spent those 5 months with the teacher I’m working with now?
 

DrumNut!

Well-known member
This guy sounds very similar to the previous drum teacher I worked with. I worked with him for 5 months and he did a lot of similar things. I felt like I didn’t even really learn anything from him in those 5 months and it was a massive waste of time and money.

I fired him and changed teachers and now I’m working with a teacher who’s excellent. I’ve only been working with the new teacher for a month and he already corrected my poor double stroke roll, my crappy left foot independence on the hi-hats, and my improper closed hi-hat sticking. All things I brought up to my old teacher which he just ignored for 5 months and the new guy helped me correct in one month.

If there are red flags then drop him. Don’t be like me and waste your time and money on a teacher who’s teaching style isn’t working for you or giving you the results you need. Just imagine how much better I would be now if I spent those 5 months
This guy sounds very similar to the previous drum teacher I worked with. I worked with him for 5 months and he did a lot of similar things. I felt like I didn’t even really learn anything from him in those 5 months and it was a massive waste of time and money.

I fired him and changed teachers and now I’m working with a teacher who’s excellent. I’ve only been working with the new teacher for a month and he already corrected my poor double stroke roll, my crappy left foot independence on the hi-hats, and my improper closed hi-hat sticking. All things I brought up to my old teacher which he just ignored for 5 months and the new guy helped me correct in one month.

If there are red flags then drop him. Don’t be like me and waste your time and money on a teacher who’s teaching style isn’t working for you or giving you the results you need. Just imagine how much better I would be now if I spent those 5 months with the teacher I’m working with now?
That’s great you moved on and found a teacher you like, it’s all part of the game. It good to know that you had a similar experience…It’s just the way some people teach I guess. I like working with a teacher who has two drum sets, and a comfortable setting. You know, I did learn some things from this teacher…It ironic but when we met last, he played a rock groove that I was working on…After he finished I realized that I play way too fast…and it doesn’t come out smooth…that’s one of my biggest problems. He taught me to read drum notation better also, and I was happy to learn new rudiments. But, my time has come to move on. You need to be on that drum set to learn how to play! I believe in pad work, but not the whole lesson. He meant well, but he liked to talk a lot and it wasted time…I wish you great success…appreciate your insight and thoughts!
 
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JDFaulky

Well-known member
That’s great you moved on and found a teacher you like, it’s all part of the game. It good to know that you had a similar experience…It’s just the way some people teach I guess. I like working with a teacher who has two drum sets, and a comfortable setting. You know, I did learn some things from this teacher…It ironic but when he played something on the drums I realized that I play too fast…and it doesn’t come out smooth…that’s one of my biggest problems. He taught me to read drum notation better also, and I was happy to learn new rudiments. But, my time has come to move on. You need to be on that drum set to learn how to play! I believe in pad work, but not the whole lesson. He meant well, but he liked to talk a lot and it wasted time…I wish you great success…appreciate your insight and thoughts!
Yep my old drum teacher was incredibly chatty and wasted a lot of the session talking about his upcoming gigs. I even had one session with him where he literally talked about himself for the entire session and we did nothing. That was the moment when I started to consider dropping him.

My new teacher has two kits. He sits on one and I sit on the other. He’ll play something and try to get me to copy him. Once we’re both playing totally in sync and in time then we move on to the next song. It’s extremely helpful. The other teacher made me stick strictly to sheet music and I learn better by ear.

It almost sounds like we had the same teacher!
 
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Odd-Arne Oseberg

Platinum Member
Oh, I definetly force everyone to learn how to read, but it's not a one size fits all thing and I try to be a bit clever about it.
 

brentcn

Platinum Member
Wow. I appreciate your insight. I’m with you. It’s strange. I don’t feel like I’m getting an honest drum lesson…perhaps he is working from a shallow base. It’s hard to find a good teacher. But that’s the journey of learning.
Thanks again. Good luck to you!

It’s never been easier to find a good teacher.
 

brentcn

Platinum Member
Oh, I definetly force everyone to learn how to read, but it's not a one size fits all thing and I try to be a bit clever about it.

Me too. But there’s no reason you can’t work on more than one thing (foot technique, independence, rudiments) at the same time. In fact, finding ways to practice more than one thing at a time is great way to improve faster. It takes a bit of imagination to find those ways.
 

DrumNut!

Well-known member
That’s what
Me too. But there’s no reason you can’t work on more than one thing (foot technique, independence, rudiments) at the same time. In fact, finding ways to practice more than one thing at a time is great way to improve faster. It takes a bit of imagination to find
 
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Odd-Arne Oseberg

Platinum Member
Me too. But there’s no reason you can’t work on more than one thing (foot technique, independence, rudiments) at the same time. In fact, finding ways to practice more than one thing at a time is great way to improve faster. It takes a bit of imagination to find those ways.

A whole routine with all the elements which can be done on any level if the teacher knows what he/she is doing.
 

drummom

Member
Find a new instructor. He sounds terrible. Its ok to move on for new skill. My child has been through three drum instructors, all great, for different reasons and none were like that. Most school band instructors don't specialize in percussion/kit. My son has never been on a pad. They all worked on how to read music/music theory/technique, foundation and fun stuff in each session.
 

DrumNut!

Well-known member
I appreciate your advice. He had personal issues, I shouldn’t have stayed with him for so long…
I agree, you have to have fun! I wasn’t…
I wish your son great success! It’s a great instrument.
 
No need for any hard feelings - it was only 4 months and you still learned a bunch of things. Just turned out it wasn't perfect. Move on and try to get the most out of your remaining lessons before the contract ends. :)
 
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