Drum myths you heard/believed when you were younger

MrInsanePolack

Platinum Member
I also remember hearing the myth that drummers get all the girls.
Wait, I thought we were supposed to die first. Crazy drummers doing crazy stuff getting themselves dead. Isn't that how it works?

I don't know if this is true or myth, but supposedly Bonham pooped 💩 in a shoe out of anger. I so want this to be true.
 

gish

Senior Member
Yes I remember the Regal Tip graphite thing, but never got the story of it, what is the black dot about?
I believe Regal Tip drills a hole in the butt and inserts a plastic plug. The sticks are then hung by the plug during the lacquering process. They simply cut it off when the stick is fully finished.
 

mikyok

Platinum Member
Another one I heard is the Zildjian Rock Ride and Ping Ride are the same cymbal with different ink.

Because rockers wouldn't be seen dead with a ping ride and vice versa 🤣🤣🤣
 

gdmoore28

Gold Member
In the late sixties, I was told that cymbals were made by laying out one long, molten "rope" of bronze on a rotating anvil while a cymbalsmith hammered the successive rings together - and that's why cymbals have grooves and hammer marks. For some reason, that myth has stuck in my head for all these years and I think about it every time I watch a video on cymbal production. It took some real imagination to come up with that bit of reverse-engineering!

GeeDeeEmm
 

Morrisman

Platinum Member
My teacher said to always tune the top head of toms tighter than the bottom head.
Then I heard a drummer say the exact opposite, and his kit sounded great.
Then I discovered that one is better suited to high jazz tuning, and the other suits low funk or rock tuning, so they were both kind of right.
 

oldskoolsoul

Silver Member
..Here's one:

-- If you use proper technique, you won't ever crack cymbals.

Fact: EVERY cymbal will crack if played long enough, regardless of technique..

Who told you that..?

Or means "played long enough" something like "played for 100+ years non stop", because i myself have several cymbals that i allready use about 30 years with every practice and every gig and no crack..

I thought this thread was meant to 'unmask' myths instead of creating new ones..
 

GetAgrippa

Platinum Member
I remember when everyone thought all drummers were crazy or dopers like Gene Krupa. Which I guess that one isn't a myth??? I know drummers get all the girls-unless you're a singing drummer-then yes LOL.
 

TK-421

Senior Member
Another one I heard is the Zildjian Rock Ride and Ping Ride are the same cymbal with different ink.

Because rockers wouldn't be seen dead with a ping ride and vice versa 🤣🤣🤣
Of course this is supposed to be a myth, but I still don't get the logic behind this one.
BTW, what would be the "vice versa" in this scenario? Pingers wouldn't be seen dead with a rock ride???
 

Rattlin' Bones

Gold Member
In 60's and 70's we made fun of anyone with a kit other than Ludwig. We thought they were of cheaper inferior construction. I was a teenager. I listened to rock not jazz. Forgive me :)

In marching band, we made fun of any drum line that used wooden marching snares. And really made fun of any band with sparkle marching drums any sparkle wrap. The only acceptable (to us) finishes were chrome, natural lacquer, or black. Really. If you had sparkle wrap marching drums it meant your drum line sucked and could not play very well.

We made fun of any snare in a kit with loose snares. Loose snares meant yo didn't know any better or else you had a bad or cheap snare drum. Now in my blues band my snares are always loose on purpose lol.

Take reso head off toms in your kit they sound better that way.
 
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GetAgrippa

Platinum Member
All drummers walk tall and carry a big stick. Hmmm no that one is true isn't it. Gosh drummers are mythic-one day they'll write books about drummers probably filled with half truths and myths :p
 

trickg

Silver Member
Who told you that..?

Or means "played long enough" something like "played for 100+ years non stop", because i myself have several cymbals that i allready use about 30 years with every practice and every gig and no crack..

I thought this thread was meant to 'unmask' myths instead of creating new ones..
Oh, no one special - just a friend of mine who is both a drummer and a mechanical engineer. He explained it once - it has something to do with the crystalline structure of the metal in bronze, and how repeated strikes combined with the vibrations eventually cause fatigue and cracking. This is straight up physics - it is not introducing a new myth.
 

Rattlin' Bones

Gold Member
It's metal fatigue. But unless you have thin cymbals and bend them a lot, that is a myth. I have heavily played cymbals 50+ years old with no cracks.

Oh, no one special - just a friend of mine who is both a drummer and a mechanical engineer. He explained it once - it has something to do with the crystalline structure of the metal in bronze, and how repeated strikes combined with the vibrations eventually cause fatigue and cracking. This is straight up physics - it is not introducing a new myth.
 

mikyok

Platinum Member
Of course this is supposed to be a myth, but I still don't get the logic behind this one.
BTW, what would be the "vice versa" in this scenario? Pingers wouldn't be seen dead with a rock ride???
Jazzers wouldn't be seen dead with a rock ride 😉
 

trickg

Silver Member
It's metal fatigue. But unless you have thin cymbals and bend them a lot, that is a myth. I have heavily played cymbals 50+ years old with no cracks.
We'll have to agree to disagree - I'm not the kind of person who likes to argue with physics.
 

larryace

"Uncle Larry"
I have a slo mo pic of me hitting one of my cymbals and truthfully, I don't know how they don't develop cracks like every week. The amount of flex a cymbal endures with only one strike kind of blows me away. I know I've broken thin sheet metal by bending it on the same bend and it eventually fails. I don't see how cymbals stay together for decades considering all the flex they go through. I would think cracks would develop along the major flex lines, but no. It really must be an awesome process to make a piece of metal able to withstand major bending for 100 years.
 

trickg

Silver Member
I have a slo mo pic of me hitting one of my cymbals and truthfully, I don't know how they don't develop cracks like every week. The amount of flex a cymbal endures with only one strike kind of blows me away. I know I've broken thin sheet metal by bending it on the same bend and it eventually fails. I don't see how cymbals stay together for decades considering all the flex they go through. I would think cracks would develop along the major flex lines, but no. It really must be an awesome process to make a piece of metal able to withstand major bending for 100 years.
This happens every time - do that enough times, and it will crack eventually.


 
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