Drum kit components that beginners waste their money on...

topgun2021

Gold Member
I think it is mostly the use of the trinkets, like drum dials, stick holders that clip on stands, glow in the dark drum sticks your aunt gives you, etc.
 

Dr_Watso

Platinum Member
I can go along with that. Some might want to master a style of music where the double pedal is of utmost importance.
I'm sure that's the case for a lot of folks. However, I still think if your goal is to be a "great drummer" the core elements of the kit should receive a lot more focus than peripherals and extras. Sure it will take a lot longer to get to the double pedaling, but when you've got a good foundation and the ability to separate your limbs on a basic kit, you'll be more rounded as a drummer, and sound better overall when you do decide to focus on the next thing.
 

Fuo

Platinum Member
I think when you're starting out IS the time for a Drum Dial. I see them as training wheels, they help get you up and running so you can focus on learning to PLAY the drums. Tuning takes a lot of time and experience to learn (with or without a DD), and shouldn't be the focus early on (but shouldn't be ignored either). I have one, but now I rarely ever use it, I'm slowly weening myself off it (not intentionally), but it WAS a useful training and convenience tool.

Same for o-rings and other muffling. Early on, I didn't want to spend 3 hours tuning my drums, I wanted to play them (and tuning time = playing time for me, I have to choose one or the other). They helped get the drums in a playable state so I could focus on playing.

Plus, if you're just practicing alone in your basement with a metronome and/or drumless tracks then who cares about "resonance" and "out front sound" and "cutting through the mix"? The sound from the driver's seat is all that really matters... That said, like the DD, I am slowly weening myself off of muffling...
 

Andy

Administrator
Staff member
Biggest waste of money for the beginner, by far, is multiple head changes in an attempt to get a certain (often uber processed) recorded sound, rather than learning how to tune.

Next on the list = premature kit upgrades.
 
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sticks4drums

Guest
Biggest waste of money for the beginner, by far, is multiple head changes in an attempt to get a certain (often uber processed) recorded sound, rather than learning how to tune.

Next on the list = premature kit upgrades.
You had me worried when you started with premature! :eek:
 

Coldhardsteel

Gold Member
If a double bass pedal is a necessity in a particular genre of music a beginner plays, then there's absolutely nothing wrong with buying one. In fact, this is probably one of the few issues I'd ever say is subjective in drum set drumming. Heck, if you need a cowbell, then get a cowbell. If you need a tambourine, get one. China? Go ahead. Let each buy according to his need.
 
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sticks4drums

Guest
I think when you're starting out IS the time for a Drum Dial. I see them as training wheels, they help get you up and running so you can focus on learning to PLAY the drums. Tuning takes a lot of time and experience to learn (with or without a DD), and shouldn't be the focus early on (but shouldn't be ignored either). I have one, but now I rarely ever use it, I'm slowly weening myself off it (not intentionally), but it WAS a useful training and convenience tool.

Same for o-rings and other muffling. Early on, I didn't want to spend 3 hours tuning my drums, I wanted to play them (and tuning time = playing time for me, I have to choose one or the other). They helped get the drums in a playable state so I could focus on playing.

Plus, if you're just practicing alone in your basement with a metronome and/or drumless tracks then who cares about "resonance" and "out front sound" and "cutting through the mix"? The sound from the driver's seat is all that really matters... That said, like the DD, I am slowly weening myself off of muffling...
Well said! I Don't understand all this hatred toward the drum dial. I love mine. Guess I am not a tuning GURU yet!
 

BradGunnerSGT

Silver Member
I think it is mostly the use of the trinkets, like drum dials, stick holders that clip on stands, glow in the dark drum sticks your aunt gives you, etc.
Why the hate for stick holders? I have one that mounts to my hi-hat and I've used it for 20 years now. It comes in handy for recovering from dropped sticks.
 
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sticks4drums

Guest
Why the hate for stick holders? I have one that mounts to my hi-hat and I've used it for 20 years now. It comes in handy for recovering from dropped sticks.
I think we should start a "Save the extras" group. They are not safe around here. :(
 
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sticks4drums

Guest
If anyone ever came up with a new piece of drum equipment that was as importand as the hi-hat, cymbal, single bass, or snare, I could just hear the chant's, "Crucify him"! :(
 

DrumEatDrum

Platinum Member
Have to disagree with many things mentioned;

Double pedal? On more than one audition, being able to play some double bass was a requirement. In one band, our "hit" song that got (some college) radio play had one short fill that used double pedal, and it was the song writers idea for me to use a double pedal on that fill.

Mounted Tambourine? Yup, used it a lot on stage. Came in handy on more than one song.

Cowbell? Yup, when the bass player said, "hey, can you use a cowbell on this song?" I said sure, I have one in my bag, let me get it.

Drum Dial? oddly enough the only reason I bought on was the producer my band was working with insisted I have one. It's usefulness is limited I agree, but I have used it in the studio. If nothing else, it kept everyone else happy.

All these items were used in my career.

About the only thing I do agree belongs on this is o-rings. And Pearl Wild cymbals. Wow, those were awful.
 

topgun2021

Gold Member
OUCH! I resemble that remark. Guess you never break sticks either! :)
All the time actually. My tendency is to chip the tips in half (or darn close near half the tip chips off at once). I desperately want to fix the severity of this. Either the stick has a nice long life and gets "normal" wear until I just buy a new stick, or half the tip breaks off at the same time.
 
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sticks4drums

Guest
All the time actually. My tendency is to chip the tips in half (or darn close near half the tip chips off at once). I desperately want to fix the severity of this. Either the stick has a nice long life and gets "normal" wear until I just buy a new stick, or half the tip breaks off at the same time.
I hear a lot of guys split stick tips. I think I have only had this happen to me once in the two years back at the acoustic kit. All my sticks just get thin on the taper from the hats. Not sure what splits the tips.
 

DrumDoug

Senior Member
All the time actually. My tendency is to chip the tips in half (or darn close near half the tip chips off at once). I desperately want to fix the severity of this. Either the stick has a nice long life and gets "normal" wear until I just buy a new stick, or half the tip breaks off at the same time.
I took a new pair of VF 5a's to church a couple of weeks ago and three songs into rehearsal, half the tip flew off. Rest of the stick looks new. I get about 2 weeks or so out of the tips of a pair of sticks before they are so chipped up I have to stop using them. I get tired of replacing sticks just for the tips, but I don't care for standard nylon tips, and the Regal Tip E series doesn't make a model that I really like.
 

AndyMC

Senior Member
The things I've found that split tips are your lower hi hat cymbal sticking out or improperly place crashes. Plus sometimes you just get bad sticks that break, I've had a stick break in 30 mins and other last 6 months, its wood so there can be a lot of variation.
 

rogue_drummer

Gold Member
Cheap stands.

One thing is an absolute MUST for a beginner (or any drummer) is a good metronome. I can't tell you how many kids or adults start drumming without a good metronome to practice with. And they and others wonder why their beat is so aweful.
 
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