Drum kit components that beginners waste their money on...

Lunar Satellite Brian

Senior Member
Now that I've been playing for a while, I look back on the purchases I made as a beginner, and the purchases other beginning drummers are making, and I realize how pointless they are for a beginner.
For instance, Cowbells, Chinas, mounted tambourines(Really? I'm the only one that did that?....okay....). Beginners often spend there money on this stuff before they even invest in new drumheads to replace their stock ones.


So post what stuff you wasted your money on as a beginner and the stuff you see beginning drummers waste their money on to amuse us, and advise beginning drummers to stay away from.

I'll post the items that are most commonly listed as being "a waste of money for beginners" here, for a easy reading list so beginners know what to stay away from.
1.Double pedals(eh... arguably? )
2.Cowbells
3.Rem-O's or Aquarian Studio-X rings
4.Extra tom drums.(I would personally say a second snare is unnecessary too.)
5.Roto Toms
 
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Metamega

Senior Member
Two beginner splashes Instead of one nice one, drum dial and torque key, cowbell, double pedal( u used it to cheat), stick holder, ahead gloves( they lasted a week before tearing), ahead aluminum sticks(awkward balance and feel), cheap stands. I'm sure theirs other crap I've wasted money on
 

Dr_Watso

Platinum Member
But what if they want to learn metal?
They should learn to play the drums first. Then move on to more specialized things like double kick pedal work.

I've known way too many "drummers" who could really only pound out blast beats and hit their china on quarter notes... Meanwhile, they can't even play something as simple as a good ol' disco beat. That's not drumming, it's a one-trick pony.
 

DrumDoug

Senior Member
Double bass pedal. Single biggest waste of money for a beginner.
I think that might have been accurate in the past, but I'm not so sure anymore. I played for 20 years with a single pedal, and now that I finally have one, I can't get my left leg and foot to do anything. I think if I had started learning how to move my left leg and foot from the beginning it would come more natrually. Double bass is so prevelant in all types of music now, I think it make since for beginners to learn how to do it from the start. It will help the learning curve later on.
 

Liebe zeit

Silver Member
I think if I had started learning how to move my left leg and foot from the beginning it would come more natrually.
You never used your hi hats?

I mean, even disco beat is both feet at 8ths. Getting into funk and soul grooves opens up more syncopated possibilities with the left foot. There are plenty of local level rock drummers that don't really use the hats tho, I'll give you that
 

DrumDoug

Senior Member
You never used your hi hats?
Only to lift my toes up to get a open bark sound. A few years ago I started playing quarter notes a lot with my hi hat foot when going to the ride, but last year I had knee surgery twice and now it hurts too much so I keep my left foot still most of the time.
 

caddywumpus

Platinum Member
Double bass pedal. Single biggest waste of money for a beginner.
+1

I've gotta admit that I bought one with my original setup. It was fun, sure, but distracted me from making music. You start wondering about how/where you're going to fit it in to the music, instead of learning to add what's complementary. It's kinda like a guitar player who solos over everything instead of figuring out how to play a part that fits nicely with the whole ensemble. Also, I've known several double bass pedal players who don't have any scrap of decent single-pedal chops. That's a real bummer!

I'd also add those "O-rings" to the list. *shivers* Learning to tune your drums should be first, THEN learn how to dampen them...
 
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sticks4drums

Guest
I think that might have been accurate in the past, but I'm not so sure anymore. I played for 20 years with a single pedal, and now that I finally have one, I can't get my left leg and foot to do anything. I think if I had started learning how to move my left leg and foot from the beginning it would come more natrually. Double bass is so prevelant in all types of music now, I think it make since for beginners to learn how to do it from the start. It will help the learning curve later on.
I have to agree with you Doug. When people knock double pedals they always refer to the extreme singularely minded blast beat. There is much more to it than that. Almost all the bands I listen to use double bass tastefully. For that style of music it is as important as many of the other components of the kit. I wish I started earlier in life, my double pedal work would be much stronger.
 

Dr_Watso

Platinum Member
I have to agree with you Doug. When people knock double pedals they always refer to the extreme singularely minded blast beat. There is much more to it than that. Almost all the bands I listen to use double bass tastefully. For that style of music it is as important as many of the other components of the kit. I wish I started earlier in life, my double pedal work would be much stronger.
Whatever you spend the most energy/time on, that's what you'll be best at. Especially for beginners, I just don't think that the one sound a second bass pedal can make should be even something to focus on. The hats are far more important, and varied in terms of options.
 

Arky

Platinum Member
Double bass pedal. Single biggest waste of money for a beginner.
In some cases - yes/maybe. In others - no. In my case - hell NO! ;-)

But thanks for the cowbell warning (another poster) - I was considering getting a cowbell indeed, for practice variation. Is it so bad an idea? Hmm... Good thread, might save me some money, haha.
 
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sticks4drums

Guest
Whatever you spend the most energy/time on, that's what you'll be best at. Especially for beginners, I just don't think that the one sound a second bass pedal can make should be even something to focus on. The hats are far more important, and varied in terms of options.
I think the point is practice it all and don't limit yourself to anything.
 
M

mediocrefunkybeat

Guest
Have to add to the 'double pedal' crowd, too. That and multiple splash cymbals, extra toms and dampened heads. Cowbells too, potentially.

What you really should be doing is upgrading incrementally if you're going to spend money. Get yourself a decent pair of hi hats, then a good ride then a good crash, in that order. Snare drum comes next and then a decent pedal or hi hat stand if you haven't already got one. When all of those things are sorted then maybe you should start looking for extras.
 

Dr_Watso

Platinum Member
I think the point is practice it all and don't limit yourself to anything.
I think at some point you have to make a choice. You can't be a master of everything, so you have to choose what's most important to master, then work on adding in other elements, all while maintaining your mastery of your chosen elements. Very few people can do everything at a master level.
 
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sticks4drums

Guest
I think at some point you have to make a choice. You can't be a master of everything, so you have to choose what's most important to master, then work on adding in other elements, all while maintaining your mastery of your chosen elements. Very few people can do everything at a master level.
I can go along with that. Some might want to master a style of music where the double pedal is of utmost importance.
 
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