Drum head choice - riddle me this!

That's equally annoying and cool I'm sure haha. I don't have much experience with that particular drum. I know buying a bunch of heads on a crapshoot can get expensive but maybe try a 5mil reso?
In actual fact, the video I posted of Carter - I think he's using an emperor hazy, which I also think is a 5mil reso?

Edit: I was wrong, it's this : https://remo.com/product/ambassador-clear-snare-side
 
I have to say, I'm genuinely curious what research you did that lead you to using such a beast of a head as an Emperor X on a Supraphonic.

In my experience Ludwig's metal snares are fairly forgiving when it comes to head and tuning choices (in that it's kinda hard to make one sound truly terrible) but they do tend to sound best with straightforward heads. For me that means a basic 1-ply coated head, with or without a dot. I've found that too much built-in muffling tends to mute the tonal nuances that make a Ludwig snare special. Aluminum especially has such a subtle tonal quality that heavy and/or overly muffled heads kill too much of the drum's character.

Ludwig's stock heads used to be looked down upon at one point, but I never really agreed with that feeling. I really like the coated Weathermaster Heavy heads on snares. I believe that both the fairly low collar and the crimp lock construction makes their heads really easy to tune.

I think it's possible that the Emperor X is muting too many of the overtones that help balance out the sound of the drum, which is accentuating only the ones that end up making the drum sound weird.
 
I think one of the reason the 402 is popular is its lively shell. You can leave it wide open or dampen it to taste, which gives it studio versatility.
The stock head should be fine, as long as it's in tune with itself (no QC issue). I'd also try Vintage A, which is softer and warmer but still sensitive, and a bit less ringing.
 
Does it do the sound when you take the snare away from the kit?
It might be one of the toms reacting with the snare head. Press each tom head, top and bottom, to find which drum is doing it, then tune it a bit higher or lower.
 
OK, after much research decided to go for an LM402 supraphonic - rave reviews, every drummer should own one, most recorded snare, versatile, blah blah

Stock batter head is a Ludwig Heavy Weather Master (Remo now?). As per, I had already pre-determined that stock heads are generally garbage and the first thing to do is switch them out. Again, after research, went for an Emperor X to try and tame the ring of the metal snare a little without the need for muffling.

Swapped out the head and, despite the lovely tone to the drum, I was hearing that really annoying post-hit goose honk from the snare wires, that was lasting around a second and a half to 2 seconds!

Tried everything - reseating both heads, loose to tight snare wires and everything in between, various tunings of both heads, and even swapping out the original snare wires for some puresound - but the problem remained.

It seemed to be a resonance issue, and I thought "maybe these snares just need a load of muffling for me to get the sound I want". But then I remembered the Carter Mclean video I'd seen, where he had a beautiful sound at all tunings seemingly without any muffling at all


It can't be the head surely? The emperor x is a 20mil head with a 5mil dot, versus the stock Ludwig that's 10mil.

However, swapped the heads back and it appears to have tamed the drum.

I'd have expected the remo head to really get the vibrations under control? Any ideas? Could it be that the stock reso just doesn't like the remo head? Should I swap the reso for something else and try it with the emperor?
I the ambassador that came on my 80’s bronze.

No mufling needed.

And bronze is less dry than alu.
 
I have to say, I'm genuinely curious what research you did that lead you to using such a beast of a head as an Emperor X on a Supraphonic.
There seemed to be a few folk suggesting it on forums, and it's a head I've used on other drums previously. Being a thicker head, the thinking was that it would reduce resonance without the need for additional muffling.
 
Does it do the sound when you take the snare away from the kit?
It might be one of the toms reacting with the snare head. Press each tom head, top and bottom, to find which drum is doing it, then tune it a bit higher or lower.
Yes, this was away from the kit
 
iainp…I realize you already have this drum, but Ludwig does also offer their “hammered” version of these aluminum supras and the model number will end with KT. LM402KT would be the 14x6.5 vetsion.

I have the LM400KT and I do find it a tad drier than the traditional smooth shell. Certainly not recommending running out and buying one, as i believe what own is one of the most iconic snares ever built…and you will end up loving it I am sure. Just wanted to add that info about the hammered models.
 
iainp…I realize you already have this drum, but Ludwig does also offer their “hammered” version of these aluminum supras and the model number will end with KT. LM402KT would be the 14x6.5 vetsion.

I have the LM400KT and I do find it a tad drier than the traditional smooth shell. Certainly not recommending running out and buying one, as i believe what own is one of the most iconic snares ever built…and you will end up loving it I am sure. Just wanted to add that info about the hammered models.
Thanks @rungeflash - when budget allows I may look into it. And will keep an eye out to see if any fellow drummers local to me use one - it's quite difficult these days to do a "try before buy", unfortunately!
 
Thanks for all of the input and advice everyone!

I'm going to leave the stock heads on there for now as they do seem great - it was my "all stock heads are crap" default :)

I do wonder why the thicker emperor head by remo made things worse though...

I think it's safe to live by this adage on cheaper drums, but I have found that upper-end drums usually come with really good heads.

Also, try a Snareweight M80 on the batter if you want to tame it a little. I love that device.
 
An instrument can sound different at a store than when you take it home. It can take you back for moment-Oh no what have I done with buyers remorse. But each time I had that reaction I just spent time with it and discovered I loved it. I bought my 22 in Zildjian K Constantinople Hi Bell Thin Ride, Low Cymbal just after listening to recordings on their site. When I first received it and started playing it-I was overwhelmed and not in a good way. I was really taken back and worried I spent a hefty sum and should have listened in person because this isn't what I expected. It's my most favorite cymbal I've ever owned.
Snares are just a different beast than any other part of a drum. The damnable wire buzz is just part of a snare-you can tame it but if you really go to extremes to eliminate it (I experimented with it and did so) then it doesn't right either (it sounds choked) LOL. I like to get some ring when I strike off center near edge with a snare. Snare wires easily resonate from harmonic frequencies emanating from your toms or kick no matter pitch and tuning of batter or reso. You just mitigate stuff like that to reduce it as best you can with tuning-muffling.
 
I think it's safe to live by this adage on cheaper drums, but I have found that upper-end drums usually come with really good heads.

Also, try a Snareweight M80 on the batter if you want to tame it a little. I love that device.
I have one on an old Tama metal snare and it works great. Really versatile too, for just throwing on and off between songs at gigs.

...but I'm going to order another now :LOL:
 
Beware if you use the Snareweight in the folded (half-muffling) position, it may deform and not come back totally flat for full muffling in case you need it.
 
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