Drum Features You Miss

dwsabianguy

Senior Member
T-rods get in the way of my kick drum pedals. All my kicks have T-rods, but I still need to change out one or two at the bottom of the batter side to get the pedal to mount flush. Maybe it's time to do some converting...

Honestly, I've got everything I want out the kits I own, but I do wish someone would bring back a Hokkaido birch kit... it doesn't seem likely that the new Sakae is going to hit the mark with the Taiwanese kits. Hopefully I'm wrong about that.

I do wish high-end drums would get rid of plastic parts completely, with few exceptions. I picked up an old Yamaha snare, and the entire throwoff was easily disassembled, cleaned, and reassembled needing nothing more than a Phillips head screwdriver; everything is metal, and it works spectacularly. Feels like everything now is riveted, and has integral plastic pieces, and it's impossible to fix those things when they break. Just gotta buy a new one.
 

dboomer

Senior Member
And that's why I mentioned the Yamaha YESS system in my last post. Yamaha licensed the patent for the "nodal point" system (from Nobel and Cooley) because it was proven to work (http://www.noblecooley.com/solid-shell-classics) in canceling out the damping properties of the tom mount and allowing the tom to ring uninhibited.
Not to go completely off topic ... but ... the nodal point primarily only occurs at only a single frequency. So if you don’t tune to that frequency it doesn’t really matter whether it’s there or not. Most have probably experienced this with bass rigs. They might ring out uncontrollably on a certain note. But if you don’t play that note then there is no ringing. Same thing with a drum. Wavelengths and multiples are set by dimensions of the shell but tuning is set by tension on the heads. So to maximize shell contributions to the overall drum sound you can tune for it or tune it out
 

Jeremy Bender

Platinum Member
There's a glaring feature or two that I wish would someday become available, but I don't want to derail this thread.
 
Last edited:

CompactDrums

Silver Member
I miss direct tom mounts I've never liked so called tom isolation systems from the past 20 odd years. So much cleaner and classic looking, no pointless chunks of metal, less wobble or movement and I honestly don't there's any major discernible difference. I wish I had the balls to get the drills out but I just know I'd screw it up!
I totally agree. I routinely remove them from my drums and install the mounting bracket on the shell.
 

Groov-E

Silver Member
T-rods are great when you need to quickly tighten or loosen bd heads.

How often do you drop a key trying to fiddle horizontally on those bd tension rods abandoning halfway and ending up with a head not in tune with itself ?

The alternative is unconscionable - taking off the tom and arm, moving cymbal stands, disengaging the pedal clamp, putting the bd on its side and then turning it all the way over, replacing muffling and putting everything back in place just right.... I get anxious just writing about it. Add mics and you have yourself a mortal enemy in the sound booth.

I secretely wish they found an elegant way to put T-rods on every drum.

;-)
 

Mustion

Senior Member
How often do you drop a key trying to fiddle horizontally on those bd tension rods abandoning halfway and ending up with a head not in tune with itself ?
Never, or at least fewer times than I've fought with those things snagging cases and car seats in transit, getting a cable stuck in it, or gashing a bare leg (Slingerland...)
I get that a regular drum key gets kind of awkward with the tension rods closest to the floor as one has to sort of lift the drum to fit the key, but then again you see the same problem with T-handles. Anyway, I have a Tama IC pedal which has the hammer-shaped drum key which solves that problem.
 

Rattlin' Bones

Gold Member
Exactly. You gotta lift the kick drum up even higher to adjust T-handles. I just have to lift a smidgeon to get drum key in. Then with T-handles you gotta adjust at least a half-turn cause you always gotta have those two on floor on batter side parallel to floor. Give me square rods any day for practical gigging.

QUOTE="Mustion, post: 1652283, member: 344158"]
Never, or at least fewer times than I've fought with those things snagging cases and car seats in transit, getting a cable stuck in it, or gashing a bare leg (Slingerland...)
I get that a regular drum key gets kind of awkward with the tension rods closest to the floor as one has to sort of lift the drum to fit the key, but then again you see the same problem with T-handles. Anyway, I have a Tama IC pedal which has the hammer-shaped drum key which solves that problem.
[/QUOTE]
 

Groov-E

Silver Member
Never, or at least fewer times than I've fought with those things snagging cases and car seats in transit, getting a cable stuck in it, or gashing a bare leg (Slingerland...)
I get that a regular drum key gets kind of awkward with the tension rods closest to the floor as one has to sort of lift the drum to fit the key, but then again you see the same problem with T-handles. Anyway, I have a Tama IC pedal which has the hammer-shaped drum key which solves that problem.
T-rods came standard on my kits, except the two rods closest to the floor which are regular squared tension rods.

Those are the two I actually wished were T-rods, as they are the worse to deal with a drum key.

I would argue that when using an Emad with muffling rings, you can get away with a quarter turn on one side or the other, that is if and only if Bob Gatzen has his back turned.
 
Last edited:
Top