Drum Dial or Tune Bot?

yammyfan

Senior Member
Great video for this thread.
Not bad but Jared doesn't use the Tune-Bot correctly and criticizes it for lacking a supporting app when it actually includes one. Ironically, he gets his snare drum sounding great with it even though he's winging it the whole time.
 

ronyd

Silver Member
Sounds like an Apple app? See, I have a super cheap Android smartphone, so I could buy three Tunebots and a couple smartphones for the price of an IPhone and a $5 app. ;)
android also ?
 

basset52

Senior Member
I usually like Jared's stuff - but his assessment of the tune bot was lightweight. Always helps to read the instructions !- you also don't come to grips with using it in 5 mins.
 

Stroman

Platinum Member
android also ?
That's cool. I have to say, I tried a free tuning app of some sort a while back, and it didn't work well at all. I figured it was my cheap phone, but maybe a better app would help.

Still, I'd rather have the dedicated device.

Thanks for the info.
 

wraub

Gold Member
Got a Drum Dial recently in a local sale, finally got around to trying it.

Using the guideline settings from DD, I found that I had tuned by ear to exactly the DD suggested range. Not sure if this speaks better for me or for the DD :D but I definitely found it useful to be sure all the lugs were set to the same tension.
I could see how the TuneBot would offer even more precision, but the Drum Dial seems to work well enough for my needs. As still a relative noob I appreciate tools that also educate, and the DD seems to be a great way to learn what different tensions do in relation to tuning, and how great a difference a quarter turn of a tension rod can make.

I like it.
 

Jeremy Crockett

Well-known Member
Got a Drum Dial recently in a local sale, finally got around to trying it.

Using the guideline settings from DD, I found that I had tuned by ear to exactly the DD suggested range. Not sure if this speaks better for me or for the DD :D but I definitely found it useful to be sure all the lugs were set to the same tension.
I could see how the TuneBot would offer even more precision, but the Drum Dial seems to work well enough for my needs. As still a relative noob I appreciate tools that also educate, and the DD seems to be a great way to learn what different tensions do in relation to tuning, and how great a difference a quarter turn of a tension rod can make.

I like it.

I am excessively afeard of over-tightening my snare heads and the Drum Dial is something that I am looking at. But I have a question: How does one "zero out" the dial? How does it get a baseline from which to measure tension?

Glad to hear that it is working for you. (y)
 

C. Dave Run

Gold Member
I am excessively afeard of over-tightening my snare heads and the Drum Dial is something that I am looking at. But I have a question: How does one "zero out" the dial? How does it get a baseline from which to measure tension?

Glad to hear that it is working for you. (y)
Wouldnt setting it on a table yield a reading of 0? Or some other hard, non moving surface. Should at least tell you what the deviation is.
 

wraub

Gold Member
I am excessively afeard of over-tightening my snare heads and the Drum Dial is something that I am looking at. But I have a question: How does one "zero out" the dial? How does it get a baseline from which to measure tension?

Glad to hear that it is working for you. (y)
The resting state is at zero, the pin at the bottom sticks out-
000000117608431-00-720x720.jpg

When placed on a drum the pin is pushed in, and that generates the tension number on the dial. In use it's very sensitive to changes, and it's easy to set in place near a tension rod and adjust the tension rod in slight increments and see the changes on the dial. I usually will lift and replace it a couple times to verify results match.

 

wraub

Gold Member
So what does happen if you set it on a table or some other hard, non moving surface?
The needle goes all the way around and stops at 99.
 

wraub

Gold Member
Cool. It works completely backwards from how I thought it works.
I was a bit unsure too until I actually used it and it became very clear. The video I linked above was also useful.

With the Drum Dial I was able to make a drum I have had no luck with over several tuning attempts actually sound pretty good- or, at least, less like a birch hat box.
 

wraub

Gold Member
.
 

Jeremy Crockett

Well-known Member
For comparison; I have DrumTune PRO for Android. It was about $12 on Google Play Store. Here are the four results I received within seconds of each other on my 14x6.5 snare:


DTP_01.jpgDtP_02.jpgDTP_03.jpgDTP_04.jpg

It's a bit less wildly inconsistent with the toms, but I am less than happy with its performance.
 

wraub

Gold Member
For comparison; I have DrumTune PRO for Android. It was about $12 on Google Play Store. Here are the four results I received within seconds of each other on my 14x6.5 snare:


View attachment 117771View attachment 117772View attachment 117773View attachment 117774

It's a bit less wildly inconsistent with the toms, but I am less than happy with its performance.

Using the Drum Dial on my snare drums, I set the batters at 89 and the resos between 80 and 83 depending on the drum. Consistent readings, and I know what that setting sounds like. I may mess with it a bit, find something I like better, and use the DD to determine how the drum is set and save those numbers to repeat.
 

cbphoto

Diamond Member
I didn’t like how the Drum Dial performed with 2-ply heads, especially after they’ve stretched out a bit. I find the TuneBot to be faster & more accurate.
 

C.M. Jones

Diamond Member
I think a drum dial would be fun to fiddle around with, just to see the numbers my normal tunings render. I wouldn't allow the device's recommended settings to dictate my tunings, however. My ears are the judge and jury in that courtroom, always and forever.
 

GetAgrippa

Diamond Member
There are technically 4 methods: by ear, drum dial, tune bot and of course the Rob Brown. There’s something for everyone- how wonderful.
 
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