Double pedals? Double bass drums?

Bo Eder

Platinum Member
I was on YouTube getting some double bass education (I know - weird since I don't normally do that) and I'm a little perturbed that players aren't sold on the idea that you can do this with TWO BASS DRUMS as opposed to a double pedal. Most of them start off with, "hey you got that shiny new double pedal, and you don't know where to start?" There needs to be a guy who talks about the advantages of having two bass drums as opposed to automatically assuming you like saving floor space with a double pedal. It's kinda' like pushing the idea of double bass into the background because it's hidden within a single bass set up, so it doesn't have to exist if you don't need it, whereas, if you have two bass drums, it's pretty obvious we're gonna hear some bass drum licks at some point during the show.

So many of my double bass heroes used two bass drums; Bellson, Shaughnessy, Cobham, Aldridge, Appice, Brian Downey., etc.,... I just think kids should be sold on that idea instead of assuming "they won't have room on stage", or "there's not enough room in the car". That's not very rock n roll, is it? Bellson brought two bass drums everywhere. I saw him play a trio with Pearl Bailey and he had two bass drums!

I'm sure that I will be in a losing argument on this, but I'm determined to bring two bass drums everywhere I go. I just got a hard case for my 24" bass drum, and I found a cool carpeted doormat measuring 4'x6' at the Home Depot for $41! I may only have a 12" rack tom, and a 16" floor tom, but there will be two bass drums shown off. I'll record the audiences reaction when they see a guy with two bass drums - maybe I'll get a better reaction than what I normally get now.
 

bud7h4

Silver Member
I play double pedal and would much prefer two kicks, or more specifically, two single pedals. I just don't want to spend a grand on a second bass drum. Maybe if I was a working drummer I could rationalize and say it's paying for itself . . . . somehow.

Practically speaking there certainly isn't a need for a second kick if you're not playing 16th notes north of 250 bpm. Mine are perfectly clear on a single kick up to 220, no triggers.
 

MrInsanePolack

Platinum Member
I prefer the double pedal. I gigged with two kicks. One kick with a double pedal is easier to set up, to tune, to carry, to position, and to afford. It's easier in the studio also.

I started with 2 kicks. I then went to a double pedal. I went back to 2 22x22 kicks for the look, and then returned to the double pedal.

I'll take convenience over looks every day. They both play the same so it doesnt really matter.
 

rocker261

Junior Member
When you play them frequently, you definitely notice the difference between a double pedal and two single pedals. Some of it may be psychological, but it still counts. Sound wise and physics, you get a wider sound using two kicks since they produce sound waves that don't interfere and cancel frequencies. When playing a single kick, the 2nd hit largely stops further vibration and sound waves of the first hit and starts over, essentially resetting the drum on each hit. Double kicks avoid that, or at least halve that occurrence, allowing each lit to vibrate further to completion. And yes looks matter, even if subconsciously to the audience. If you have the same drummer, but playing a single kick set, and then a double kick set, the audience will perceive a difference (and my opinion better perception) playing the two kicks.
 

Bo Eder

Platinum Member
I play double pedal and would much prefer two kicks, or more specifically, two single pedals. I just don't want to spend a grand on a second bass drum. Maybe if I was a working drummer I could rationalize and say it's paying for itself . . . . somehow.

Practically speaking there certainly isn't a need for a second kick if you're not playing 16th notes north of 250 bpm. Mine are perfectly clear on a single kick up to 220, no triggers.
I'm not even approaching that level of foot proficiency. Right now I'm just happy to stick some 16th notes into certain grooves just so you know the second bass drum is being hit, or doing the occasional rolling thunder on the ends of songs. I'm no speed metal guy yet.
 
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Justinhub2003

Silver Member
Personally think any drummer showing up to a gig with a 2nd kick drum, they better be a bad mother lover on the double kick. Like if you roll up to a gig with a double kick set up and then turn around and Play Mustang Sally or some butt rock then your going to look pretty silly.

Danny Carey plays two kick drums but he’s a bad mother lover. He can pull it off. Regular joe playing the classics just looks like they want attention.

In my opinion of course.
 

AzHeat

Platinum Member
And here I still sit trying to do everything I used to listen to back in HS on a single pedal. I guess I’ll never be able to hang with the cool kids! All seriousness, I’m not sure there’s all that much negativity against two BDs as much as it just isn’t the latest thing. Back in the 80s, it was a thing. Every rock band seemingly had them and sets were sold that way. Today’s, outside of a few manufacturers, everything is sing,e BD and it costs a fortune to get the second unless you can get two low or midrange kits to put together. Generally tough to sell off the extra Tom’s if everyone has the same size. I think that has a ton to do with it too.
 

iCe

Silver Member
I was lucky enough to spot a b-stock 22x18 bass drum for like half the price of a new one. So i immediately bought it and even drove for 1 1/2 hours just to pick it up (was too afraid something might happen during transport). Did take me quite some time before i actually started using it. Was content with my single bass and double pedal, but in December 2018 i decided it was time...

Soundwise the difference is huge; because the beater slave pedal doesn't mute the vibrations of the main beater, i notice(d) a much more clear sound when playing double bass. Also when playing faster tempo's or on fills it's more articulate. Speaking of sound; i don't tune them the exact same way. I love that there is a difference in sound and that you can hear 2 distinct bass drums. It doesn't bother me at all that they sound a bit different. We play a song where for a good part of the double bass section i'm leading with my left foot and i just like that it sounds a bit different than when leading with my right foot.

I do use double bass quite a bit and that 'justifies' using it, besides reason number one; just always wanting a 2nd bass drum because it looked cool hehe. If i ever join a band or cover band which hardly uses double bass, i'd just use a double pedal. A pet peeve of mine; seeing a double bass set with just one mic in the main bassdrum and using a double pedal. Ok, it looks cool, but i'd just drop the 2nd bass drum then. You're not fooling me :p
 

JimmyM

Platinum Member
I'm not seeing double pedals as much of a compromise. Two bass drums is very enjoyable, but as far as I'm concerned, it's 99% looking for 100%. And I've already frightened two BL's I work with on bass and guitar with telling them that I have a double pedal set. I show up with two bass drums and they would have a breakdown.

But I fully support your right to commit to it, then bail after a couple gigs :D
 

Super Phil

Senior Member
I love the look of two bass drums, but I rarely take out the 2nd bass drum for gigs. I call it the 'special occasion' kit. It's a lot more work, and I can't fit it in the car. I think the last time I used two kicks was at the Mississippi Moon Bar in Dubuque, Iowa. They have a wonderfully huge stage, and there is plenty of room in our band trailer for things like an extra kick. But I always get excited when I see someone put in the effort to rock that 2nd kick. 🤘
 

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BonsaiMagpie

Junior Member
One thing that irks me about double pedals is the horizontal positioning of the beaters. It seems they are made so that the primary beater is on centre and the secondary is a couple of inches off. I'd rather that they were equally off-centre.
I understand there are double pedals which do this, but as I've already paid a huge sum for my Yamaha DFP9 pedals and they are very good, I don't think I'll be buying any more.
 

KEEF

Senior Member
Depends where/what you're playing imo - metal gigs - have at it. Covers in a wedding band? Nah......
The beauty of double pedals is you can do 99% of the licks with none of the hassle. Tuning, heads, two mics, transport, stage space etc etc
Back in the day I had two kicks and never even put a pedal on the 2nd one - all for the look - I am older and wiser now.
 

JimmyM

Platinum Member
One thing that irks me about double pedals is the horizontal positioning of the beaters. It seems they are made so that the primary beater is on centre and the secondary is a couple of inches off. I'd rather that they were equally off-centre.
I understand there are double pedals which do this, but as I've already paid a huge sum for my Yamaha DFP9 pedals and they are very good, I don't think I'll be buying any more.
I've gotten mine fairly close to an even position, but I don't quite center my main beater anyway. I think if I were more into double bass rather than only having an occasional need for it, I might be more concerned about having two bass drums than I am. Sure have seen a lot of players rip a million times faster than I'll ever need with one bass drum and sound great with them, though.
 

Frosticles

Silver Member
I played two bass drums for many years. When I was younger it was fine & didn't bother me. I got my first double pedal in 1996 & that was it. Sold the second bass drum & never looked back.
Yes, double bass drums look great but are a pain in the arse to lug around etc. At 55, I am looking everywhere to save weight & aggro :ROFLMAO:
 

iCe

Silver Member
Yes, double bass drums look great but are a pain in the arse to lug around etc. At 55, I am looking everywhere to save weight & aggro :ROFLMAO:

Luckily these days Pancake bassdrums are a thing, soooooo... 😜
 

Bo Eder

Platinum Member
I played two bass drums for many years. When I was younger it was fine & didn't bother me. I got my first double pedal in 1996 & that was it. Sold the second bass drum & never looked back.
Yes, double bass drums look great but are a pain in the arse to lug around etc. At 55, I am looking everywhere to save weight & aggro :ROFLMAO:
Funny I’m 55 now and am going bigger.
 
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