Double bass

larryace

"Uncle Larry"
This thread is aimed at drummers who never owned a double pedal.

I'm decades late to this party. I never owned a double pedal, still don't.

How many drummers who never owned a double pedal have a 2nd bass drum and pedal?

If you don't have a double pedal, but you do have a 2nd bass drum and a spare pedal, how many drummers have never set a 2nd bass drum up?

This was me until a few weeks ago. The reason I'm going here is that I had no idea how beneficial playing 2 bass drums (or playing a double pedal) is for my basic coordination and timing on a single bass drum kit. I have a pretty good hi hat foot, so I thought double bass wouldn't be as hard as it is. Wrong lol. Hi hat and a 2nd bass drum are two totally different disciplines I found out. Having a good hi hat foot didn't mean a thing when it came to me trying to play double bass drums.

I'm really glad I set one up as it opened up a whole new world of linear coordination exercises for me.

Especially if you are in a rut it's a breath of fresh air and it really exposed some pretty bad timing/coordination issues in me, which I welcome.
 
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KEEF

Senior Member
I used to play double bass drums with single pedals - then I went to double bass drums with a double pedal on one of them - so i didn't have to try and tune them both the same - then i went to double pedal on one and a single pedal on the other and tuned it higher. Now I play double pedal on one bass drum - well...... I don't play it really - I use it on Vegas endings and that's about it.
Times I have tried to master it I too have found it causes issues on other aspects of my playing that are not issues otherwise. 🤷‍♂️
 

GetAgrippa

Platinum Member
Timely Larry. I've been doing coordination exercises with my feet between hats and bass. So I decided to try my double pedal again-since I've been making progress. Well I can't get my slave pedal to feel natural like my hats. I've got a 16X16in Sonor safari and 16X13 Pearl Pod bass drums and I've doing exercises with them. They sounded so different, at first, it was throwing me off so I tuned them and then taped a quarter to each for the click sound so they sound similar. Man it's fun but I miss my hats. When I play fast doubles and triplets with my one dominant foot it sounds better and I can play them coordinated faster with one pedal. Throw the second pedal with a kick and like throwing a wrench in there. I like the exercises with hats but barefoot I can't get fast doubles, triplets, quads with my hat foot-the hats sticks past two-with shoes stomping it works though-but I hate wearing shoes when I play.
 
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Dr_Watso

Platinum Member
I've tried but I really can't get into it. I have a hard time with straight up exercises sometimes and I find my practice time is personally better spent working towards specific musical goals or something I actually need to do on a regular basis.

Since I don't ever "hear" double bass lines in my head for really anything (don't play that kind of metal; being honest I don't like the sound of most DB) it's hard for me to make a line from mindless double bass exercise to something I'll ever use musically.

The world of music is so huge I have no problem coming up with more and more things I actually do like to play that I can improve or work on.

That is not to say there's no value in learning it. Just my own experience. I still have a double on my practice kit but I just don't really practice with it meaningfully.
 

Vintage Old School

Gold Member
Back in my younger days--long before the advent of double pedals--I played double bass with single pedals. It never had much to do with the influence of well known drummers who were playing double bass at the time. It finally dawned on me that my background and training in piano carried over into my early drumming years. Mentally it seemed like having more drum voices was "natural." Who would ever want a keyboard with half of the keys missing? The more drums meant more options sonically.

With age I started thinning down my kit in phases and it it became more and more comfortable with fewer drums, so I stuck with a single bass and single pedal. Wisdom came a knockin' later in life and I realized that all I needed to focus on was the feel and groove.

I've toyed with the notion a couple of times of picking up a double pedal, but have resolved I much prefer the simplicity of single bass, single pedal.

That being said, I've got nothing but respect for everyone who plays double pedals.
 

drumnut87

Well-known member
i learnt on two bass drums and single pedals, then space and the music dictated that i go to a double pedal, just never felt the same since the swap over.
 

beatdat

Senior Member
I had no idea how beneficial playing 2 bass drums (or playing a double pedal) is for my basic coordination and timing on a single bass drum kit. I have a pretty good hi hat foot, so I thought double bass wouldn't be as hard as it is. Wrong lol. Hi hat and a 2nd bass drum are two totally different disciplines I found out. Having a good hi hat foot didn't mean a thing when it came to me trying to play double bass drums.
That's why I do it, too.

My home practice setup is pretty simple: a single practice pad and a double pedal. But, I don't play double bass, and my kit at my rehearsal space doesn't have one.

So, why do I bother?

Too me, it's like you noticed, it has to do with the independence exercises I practice, which evenly split the left side and the ride side of my body. For some reason, I don't seem to benefit as much when I practice them using a single pedal and a hi-hat pedal. To me, the two different tones interfere with me from concentrating on how clean my timing and spacing of both my feet are - in other words, I find it easier to fudge my practice with a single pedal and a hi-hat pedal (maybe because I find it more musical?), whereas a double pedal allows me to focus on just the timing and spacing of my feet and not the tone.

I suppose it's a similar reason as to why, for the most part, we practice on a single pad and not more than one, especially when it comes to basic conditioning exercises.

But then again, this is just practice.

Now, if I were to ever play double bass, I don't think I'd use a double pedal or two identical bass drums - nah, I'd setup and play a 24" and 20" side-by-side.
 
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larryace

"Uncle Larry"
The hi hat gets in the way otherwise it would be good thing!
I'm able to have one of the 3 HH legs going over the footboard. I can get my hi hat in fairly close and miraculously, it all works. My beater rod comes this close to the HH leg but there's no contact lol.

But right now I have my hands full trying to drill myself on linear stuff with the other bass drum so the hi hat doesn't get used really.
 

paradiddle pete

Platinum Member
yes a hi hat mounted on a stand would work so it's not on the the floor I guess. I just bought an Orphan 18' bass drum I might put it with a 22" set see what happens..
 
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RickP

Gold Member
I won't use double bass or pedal at my gigs. But I'm digging it in the practice room.
I am the same as Larry - I have one on my practice e-kit, I really have no reason to gif with it . The Music I play really doesn’t call for one . I do have fun with it on my e-kit . I like to go through Colin Bailey’s excellent Bass Drum Control book .
 

jornthedrummer

Silver Member
I’m 54. For me, double bass drum is like gospel chops - nice to know, but not used in the music I like or play.
I do have a couple of double pedals. But they are not used.
 

moneydog59

Junior Member
One bass drum, double pedal guy here...American Band was one of the songs that one of the bands I'm in asked me to do for my audition 3 years ago. I had been only back playing 6 months or so at the time and there was no way I was going to be able to get the double in the opening rif, so I grabbed a used Iron Cobra double. played it well enough to get the gig...I don't use it much otherwise. Lord knows I have a million other things to get sorted before I master double bass. The bands I'm in luckily do not require it, except of course American Band...
 

larryace

"Uncle Larry"
One bass drum, double pedal guy here...American Band was one of the songs that one of the bands I'm in asked me to do for my audition 3 years ago. I had been only back playing 6 months or so at the time and there was no way I was going to be able to get the double in the opening rif, so I grabbed a used Iron Cobra double. played it well enough to get the gig...I don't use it much otherwise. Lord knows I have a million other things to get sorted before I master double bass. The bands I'm in luckily do not require it, except of course American Band...
I always just assumed that Don used single bass on the intro, ala Bonham.

When I heard Deep Purple's "Fireball" I wasn't aware of double bass drumming yet, so I naturally thought Ian was using one pedal.

I learned both songs on a single pedal. "Fireball" sounds OK but it sounds much smoother with a double but "American Band" works fine with a single.

I'm not entirely convinced that "AB" is a double.
 
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moneydog59

Junior Member
I would assume he does. I asked my drum teacher about it, he smiled and just ripped through it one pedal. I needed to use a double pedal, my doubles just aren't fast enough.
 

acsunda

Junior Member
I recently bought a double pedal for the first time, spent a few days trying to get it positioned comfortably, and just couldn't. Hi-hats always end up too far away or at a weird angle. Ended up selling it.
 

MntnMan62

Junior Member
I bought a double pedal several years ago. Well, probably at least 10 years ago. But I wasn't playing all that regularly. My reason for buying one was that I was wanting to be able to do some of the more basic double bass things that I would hear being done and liked the effect they have on the music. So I bought a DW7000. It's a single chain design and I find it to be real smooth. Sometimes I wonder if I should have gotten the 9000 with the double chains but I'm not doing metal or goth music so that would be overkill. But I can't even handle doing straight 8th notes while trying to do a simple quarter notes on the ride and 2 and 4 on the snare. Obviously I need to spend more time working on that but I'm finding it to be counter to what my brain wants my limbs to do. I am motivated to get a handle on it, at least at a basic level. It would be nice to be able to do the straight 8th notes like Steve Smith does on Jean Luc Ponty's Enigmatic Ocean. Mirage. But when I go jam with my weekly jam I leave the double home and take a single. I won't start using it with other people until I can actually play it.
 
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