Don't buy a boat...er uh, I mean a venue.

C.M. Jones

Well-known member
Here on my clump of dirt, the closest town (pop. 200) is 5.5 miles away. The closest city (pop. 60,000) is 15 miles away. The cops don’t come, the county sheriff does, and it takes 20 minutes if he breaks the speed limits on the way. What’s weird is my property taxes pay for a school district in the adjoining county, not the one I live in, but taxes for other "services" (sheriff, road maintenance, etc.) go to entities in my county.

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Lovely spot. I live in a farming community, though not on a farm.

The first rule of comprehending tax allocations is to give up on attempting to comprehend tax allocations. Accept them in the way you would a tornado, an earthquake, or the flu. And know that, like the aforementioned undesirables, they'll be right back to haunt you next year.
 
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Andy

Administrator
Staff member
In the UK a city is a very large town*.
Usually yes, but not in terms of designation. A town is given city status by the monarch. In the UK, it's not uncommon for a city to be substantially smaller than many towns. My nearest town sized settlement, Hereford (18 miles), has city status, yet only has a population of circa 65,000, but it is in one of the most sparsely populated areas of the UK.

It may surprise you to know that the city of London has a population of less than 9,000, and the UK's smallest city has a population of around 1,800.
 

Yamaha Rider

Well-known member
Usually yes, but not in terms of designation. A town is given city status by the monarch. In the UK, it's not uncommon for a city to be substantially smaller than many towns. My nearest town sized settlement, Hereford (18 miles), has city status, yet only has a population of circa 65,000, but it is in one of the most sparsely populated areas of the UK.

It may surprise you to know that the city of London has a population of less than 9,000, and the UK's smallest city has a population of around 1,800.
Like I said - there are small Cathedral towns called cities.
 

wraub

Well-known member
I live in the largest county in my state, in fact, one of the the largest counties in the US. In that county are many cities and towns.
Some have their own councils, governments, fire, police, etc, while some rely on the county to provide those, and some places actually overlap and get some of both.
All in the county pay sales and property taxes, unless they don't. But this gets political really quick.
Also, there's a lot of alcohol here.

You can imagine the shouting, I'm sure.
 

wraub

Well-known member
I used to live in what is (was) a very small town here, and it had about 9-10,000 people. I had no idea London was so similar. :D


Usually yes, but not in terms of designation. A town is given city status by the monarch. In the UK, it's not uncommon for a city to be substantially smaller than many towns. My nearest town sized settlement, Hereford (18 miles), has city status, yet only has a population of circa 65,000, but it is in one of the most sparsely populated areas of the UK.

It may surprise you to know that the city of London has a population of less than 9,000, and the UK's smallest city has a population of around 1,800.
 

TMe

Senior Member
From everything I've heard, owning a music bar is very political. A person needs to establish connections first. One way is to establish credibility. That usually comes from working a long time in hospitality and really knowing who's who in the industry, in regulatory bodies, and in municipal government.

If someone buys a music bar with no industry experience and no contacts, they're facing a major uphill battle. You pretty much need to be a member of the club before you start.

You could see that as corruption, but in some jurisdictions it's all very clearly defined and up-front. You can't even get a liquor licence without producing some serious bona fides. It helps to have endorsements from some of the officials you'll need to work with.

More briefly, hospitality is not an industry where you can start at the top. You really need to pay your dues first. Otherwise, you're seen as an interloper and you become a target.

Even if you hire a top notch manager to run the business for you, officials will still be scrutinizing your personal credibility.
 

No Way Jose

Silver Member
I remember talking to a bar owner. The bar owner said, when she and her husband were looking for a bar to buy, many bars were for sale, but only two bars would give 3 month accounting statements. Most of the bars gave only one month accounting reports. My guess is lots of small businesses don't have formal accounting procedures in place.
 

KamaK

Platinum Member
I remember talking to a bar owner. The bar owner said, when she and her husband were looking for a bar to buy, many bars were for sale, but only two bars would give 3 month accounting statements. Most of the bars gave only one month accounting reports. My guess is lots of small businesses don't have formal accounting procedures in place.
I highly recommend using Dinerware, or some other similar POS. Taxes, Payroll, Reporting, Inventory, Shift/Schedule, Age Verification, and Accounting are things that should be documented and reconciled automatically. Your accountant simply imports into quickbooks and checks for sanity once a month.

Possible legitimate reasons not to use (something like) Dinerware..... You are the owner and only employee... Can't think of any others actually.
 
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