Dominant side (way) slower than non-dominant with singles

TMe

Senior Member
My left fingers feel lighter, more free to move. Better independence between the middle and ring fingers too, they're really stuck together on my right side...

Is it possible one hand has just taken more abuse and developed more muscle so the other hand is more flexible, and less musclebound?

I notice I'm more comfortable leading with the ring and pinky, while the middle finger just follows.

That sounds like the grip advocated in Moeller's book. As I get older, my fingers are starting to seize up so I try to use nothing but that grip. I'm hoping it will work well for me when my dexterity is kaput.
 

toddbishop

Platinum Member
I'm just not sure both hands can necessarily be brought to the same level for everyone.

Maybe-- I haven't done a study or anything. In teaching I just haven't seen beginners favoring one hand significantly-- at the stage of development where hand dominance should be the biggest, theoretically. I've also noticed that I often have to be very persistent in getting people to see what their hands are actually doing, and to do the simple thing I'm asking them to do. I think a lot of people are not great at self-teaching, and at observing their own playing. There's always the question of how much time people are really spending with it....
 

Stroman

Platinum Member
Maybe-- I haven't done a study or anything. In teaching I just haven't seen beginners favoring one hand significantly-- at the stage of development where hand dominance should be the biggest, theoretically. I've also noticed that I often have to be very persistent in getting people to see what their hands are actually doing, and to do the simple thing I'm asking them to do. I think a lot of people are not great at self-teaching, and at observing their own playing. There's always the question of how much time people are really spending with it....

I suspect that's a big component, especially for older players coming back in order to correct technique. When I started practicing in a mirror again, it was enlightening.
 

Spreggy

Silver Member
Hey Jassz, I recently started with a great teacher. I've played for 50 years, I should know what I'm doing, but right off the bat he pointed out how uneven my hands were and convinced me that was the first thing to work on. He made me realize my singles and doubles were like a galloping horse. :D So we drill hitting evenly constantly, developing touch and even dynamics. We face each other on cam and I play double, 5, 7, 9, 13, 17 stroke rolls and the whole flam collection for at least 30 minutes of the lesson while he tweaks my technique and demonstrates the right way. Sometimes it's the whole hour, that's how important it is, you've gotta get this done. I'm making serious progress, and of course it bleeds into every facet of playing.
So my recommendation is get a skype lesson set up with Todd Bishop because he sounds like he knows exactly what to do to help you. And then buy into whatever he says a hundred percent and practice a lot every day. You'll be there in no time. I've personally lived through having immovable barriers in my playing changed overnight by a teacher, spend that cash and get your fix!
 

jassz

Member
Thank you for all the tips!

Why are you using fingers on 8th notes at qtr note = 150?



Would you mind sharing some video of your impossible to be improved upon technique? Just eight notes per hand and some different speeds, maybe.

I don't need to use fingers for 8th notes at 150 in real playing, obviously...

I'm not sure a video can be of any use, my technique is standard, although rusty since I kinda gave up on playing drums seriously.
Also in my opinion it comes down to finger tapping speed, hence the Jojo Mayer exercise. The drumstick and drum head are additional parameters. If I can't tap 8th notes at 200 comfortably I don't see the point of trying to achieve that speed with a drumstick.

But I will think about taking a few lessons with a good teacher as suggested.

Since a few days I have added repeated notes exercises to my piano technique routine, it seems easier for me to stay loose when I strike piano keys, and it also benefits my piano playing. I'll see if I can break a wall this way.
 

jassz

Member
Is it possible one hand has just taken more abuse and developed more muscle so the other hand is more flexible, and less musclebound?

Yeah, might be something like that.
And/Or my dominant hand has developed control and complexity of motion at the expense of more simple tasks. My early piano training may have reinforced such tendency...

I just had a practice session on the piano. Pushed the exercise to repeated 16th notes at 90, after a good warmup at lower speeds. I'll stick to this as my max for a while, see if I can get 100% comfortable there. Patience is definitely a big factor.
 

toddbishop

Platinum Member
I'm not sure a video can be of any use, my technique is standard, although rusty since I kinda gave up on playing drums seriously.
Also in my opinion it comes down to finger tapping speed, hence the Jojo Mayer exercise. The drumstick and drum head are additional parameters. If I can't tap 8th notes at 200 comfortably I don't see the point of trying to achieve that speed with a drumstick.

What sort of help were you hoping to get on the forum? Are you just making an announcement about a defective limb, in your judgment, or what.
 

jassz

Member
Well, sorry if I sound stubborn.
My n°1 hope was to get feedback from people who have dealt or are dealing with the same issue, either for themselves of through teaching.
This was not the case, but I'm still getting very valuable tips and opinions.
 

mrfingers

Senior Member
For some people “matched” grip just means not “trad” where one hand plays French grip the other American/German grip. Whatever works.
 
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