Does anyone know the weight of a....

C.M. Jones

Well-known member
The Memphis Drum Shop site usually lists cymbal weights, but they have only one of these crashes in stock right now, and its weight isn't included. If you can find the weight for one 14", chances are high that yours will be very close. Paiste's specs are incredibly consistent.

Alternative: Place it on a postal scale.
 

davor

Senior Member
I don't own the cymbal, I was just wondering how the weight would compare to it's hi-hat Top counterpart (which is 800, and the bottom is 1350)
 

johnjssmith

Junior Member
PST7 14" thin crash??
There's a spreadsheet you can find online pretty easily with the weights of (mostly) every Paiste cymbal.
The PST7 14" thin crash is listed as 573g, much too thin even for a top hat if you ask me, you'll lose a lot of volume, which might be a concern because the chick could become too quiet, and you'll lose a lot of definition because of the light weight and the thinner edge profile.
That said, definitely go ahead and find a light cymbal to use as a top hat, experimenting is good and you might like the end result!
 

C.M. Jones

Well-known member
The PST7 14" thin crash is listed as 573g . . .

That's extremely light for a 14" diameter and, I would agree, too light for a hi-hat top, though I'm speaking only for myself in this case. I've noticed that many Paiste profiles are lighter than those of Zildjian and so on. Perhaps B8, by its very nature, is a lighter alloy than B20? I've never come across a discussion on that topic.
 

MrInsanePolack

Platinum Member
That's extremely light for a 14" diameter and, I would agree, too light for a hi-hat top, though I'm speaking only for myself in this case. I've noticed that many Paiste profiles are lighter than those of Zildjian and so on. Perhaps B8, by its very nature, is a lighter alloy than B20? I've never come across a discussion on that topic.
That's a nice new can of worms you have there! You should open it...
 

Winston_Wolf

Platinum Member
That's extremely light for a 14" diameter and, I would agree, too light for a hi-hat top, though I'm speaking only for myself in this case. I've noticed that many Paiste profiles are lighter than those of Zildjian and so on. Perhaps B8, by its very nature, is a lighter alloy than B20? I've never come across a discussion on that topic.
Copper is a little heavier than tin, so bronze would get lighter as the tin content increases. When dealing with objects in the range of cymbal weight I'd bet the difference is pretty negligible though.
 

C.M. Jones

Well-known member
Copper is a little heavier than tin, so bronze would get lighter as the tin content increases. When dealing with objects in the range of cymbal weight I'd bet the difference is pretty negligible though.

Got it. I haven't looked at a periodic table of the elements since high-school chemistry. :)

For whatever reason, Paiste seems fond of lightweight specs in certain lines. Another theory: Perhaps they offset B8's intrinsic brightness by dropping cymbal weights somewhat, thus promoting a lower tonal voice. I really don't know. Just speculating.
 
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opentune

Platinum Member
Copper has a higher density (8 g/cc) than pure tin (7.3 g/cc). But metal alloys are mixtures, with different formulae (B8 vs B20) and the crystal structure of the alloy has a different density. So the density versus compositon change (copper to tin) is not necessarily linear.

No matter ...1486 grams is way too damn heavy a 14 inch crash cymbal (more akin to an 18 actually)

A 16 inch Paiste PST3 full crash (same B8 alloy) weighs 1000 grams, a 14 is less than that.
 

MrInsanePolack

Platinum Member
Ha! I hope the can stays sealed this time around. You know I don't have it in for a given alloy. You can make a great cymbal out of B8, B12, B20 or any combination thereof. It's all about craftsmanship.
Oh yeah, I was just hoping to see some ensued nonsense. Unfortunately (<--I jest) this place is full of smart people, and already have taken the proper routes to correctly solve the question.
 
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