Does anyone gig with hybrid drums?

Vandalay

Member
The guitarist with a new band I'm joining asked my thoughts about electronic drums onstage. He said we'll most likely be playing small rooms, and is concerned with stage volume. I see his point, and I can convert my kit with triggers, mesh heads, and an old Yamaha dtx3 module, anyone else doing this?
 

williamsbclontz

Silver Member
The guitarist with a new band I'm joining asked my thoughts about electronic drums onstage. He said we'll most likely be playing small rooms, and is concerned with stage volume. I see his point, and I can convert my kit with triggers, mesh heads, and an old Yamaha dtx3 module, anyone else doing this?
That’s not a hybrid setup, that’s just a full electronic setup. Hybrid drums would be using both acoustic and electronic elements in one kit

Nothing wrong with converting an acoustic kit to an electric kit though. Lots of people do it
 

mikyok

Platinum Member
That’s not a hybrid setup, that’s just a full electronic setup. Hybrid drums would be using both acoustic and electronic elements in one kit

Nothing wrong with converting an acoustic kit to an electric kit though. Lots of people do it
If you can do the conversion cool.

There's way too many places that are booking bands but are way too small to accommodate them and will blame the inevitable volume on you.

Playing a piece of music that's got a bit of oomph to it softly and with feel is bloody hard. The amount of times I wish I just had a volume knob when I'm spending a gig eyeballing a noise limiter isn't even funny!

Failing the electronic route a suitcase kit would do the job just as well.
 

brentcn

Platinum Member
If you can do the conversion cool.

There's way too many places that are booking bands but are way too small to accommodate them and will blame the inevitable volume on you.

Playing a piece of music that's got a bit of oomph to it softly and with feel is bloody hard. The amount of times I wish I just had a volume knob when I'm spending a gig eyeballing a noise limiter isn't even funny!

Failing the electronic route a suitcase kit would do the job just as well.
Lots of truth here. Playing quietly is not easy -- BUT it's also a skill worth developing!

The worst parts of e-kits are the hi-hat and snare. The misfires, lack of a good cross-stick sound, unreliable opening/closing of hi-hats -- these are deal-breakers. Also, the cables and input jacks, after a few weeks of plugging and unplugging, are going to start shorting out. If you're just bashing simple rock beats for a gig or two, it's fine, but in the long run, and for the quality of ghost notes and snare/hi-hat work? Nope.

If you're planning on spending that kind of money to convert your acoustic kit, you might instead consider buying a shell pack with bop sizes, and some darker, thinner cymbals. Sonor Safari and Ludwig Breakbeats are among the more affordable options.

Now, if you want an e-kit for home use, that's a different animal entirely.
 

larryace

"Uncle Larry"
I would focus on the more valuable skill of volume control.

A drummers volume control seems to be the biggest complaint coming from everyone else. And I agree.

If a drummer focuses on it, or better yet is forced to tame themselves or lose the gig....volume can absolutely be tamed, with the energy remaining intact.

I always felt that you don't need volume to convey energy.

"Energy" is a mindset. It's the purpose...and force of will...confidence if you wish...with what you play on the drums. It's being completely sure of what you are playing. "Energy" is what you impart to your drums through your personality, for better or for worse. Volume to me is unrelated to that. Volume and energy can be mutually exclusive IMO.

It's not a popular notion.
 

New Tricks

Platinum Member
I would focus on the more valuable skill of volume control.

A drummers volume control seems to be the biggest complaint coming from everyone else. And I agree.

I certainly could not disagree with that.

I rarely see a drummer that knows what volume they need to be playing to fit into the mix. I know it can be done but I know it's a difficult task. You are sitting in the worst possible position, behind all the sounds.

I will see drummers totally dominating on the snare, just making a racket. Same with crash cymbals. It seems like the only way to train yourself on the proper force necessary would be thru countless hours of playing with other instruments and having someone with a good ear giving you feedback. Maybe playing facing the amps/PA would help???

I didn't want to be that overbearing drummer so I took the easy way out and went electronic. :)

The other 2 things that factored in were:

1) we are able to rehearse with a great mix at a reasonable volume, keeping the vocals on top and eliminating ears ringing.

2) I am always in search of a good/great mix. I listen to the mix more than I listen to the notes the bands are playing. I realized tha,t with no stage volume, I could control the mix and keep it consistent.

Those were the things that sent me in the direction I took and I am please with the results.
 

rikguy33

Junior Member
The band that I'm playing with also had stage volume concerns. Everyone plays thru the PA. I started with my ekit and after a couple of gigs decided to convert a kit that I had sitting around. The PDP EZ shells were light and easy to transport. A local guys had a set of mesh heads for sale and I bought a set of Ddrum redshot triggers. Using my Yamaha DTXpress module, I was ready to go. The only double trigger issues that I'm having are with my bass drum and occasional mis-trigger from a crash cymbal. I'm also using my Yamaha E-cymbals. IMO these drums look an feel better than the ekit but it does take some work to get the trigger settings right. The mesh heads do not feel like "real" drum heads but they are different than the rubber pads that I was playing. Most people don't realize that I'm playing electronics and we get lots of compliments on the sound.
 

Vandalay

Member
My apologies for not knowing the diffrence between a hybrid & electronic kit,

I do agree the electronic kits sit better in a mix, and don't overpower the band, I am going to try to use my regular cymbals, I'm not a hard hitter, and they shouldn't be overly loud..

I have a Tama SSC kit, 20/12/14 that I'm looking to convert, I'm guessing a powered stage monitor is what I'll be needing onstage?
 

New Tricks

Platinum Member
My apologies for not knowing the diffrence between a hybrid & electronic kit,

I do agree the electronic kits sit better in a mix, and don't overpower the band, I am going to try to use my regular cymbals, I'm not a hard hitter, and they shouldn't be overly loud..

I have a Tama SSC kit, 20/12/14 that I'm looking to convert, I'm guessing a powered stage monitor is what I'll be needing onstage?
If you use A cymbals, it a hybrid.

As long as you don't smash the crashes, they can blend in. One plus on the E kit is that you can bring up your toms and bass, which often need to be mic'd on an A kit.

For a monitor, it won't sound great without at least a 15" (bi amped) cabinet and some EQ adjustments to get some low end.. The better/bigger the monitor, the better it will sound. Obviously, the PA will also have to be adequate.
 

mikyok

Platinum Member
I would focus on the more valuable skill of volume control.

A drummers volume control seems to be the biggest complaint coming from everyone else. And I agree.

If a drummer focuses on it, or better yet is forced to tame themselves or lose the gig....volume can absolutely be tamed, with the energy remaining intact.
Totally agree. Tickling with dynamics gets you out of some sticky situations. Stately homes and castles spring to mind!

I've had to do tracks like Mr Brightside at just above talking volume. It's an incredibly useful tool to have in the locker.
 

Mike mackin

Junior Member
Hi. I play using a hybrid set up. Trigger bass and snare using tm 6 pro and fire loops. Use x2 Roland pad8’s to left and right and monitor through Roland pm200. The triggered sounds run through front house and the bass end is fantastic. The kit I use is a dw collectors. We do mix the kit as well on occasions when the size of the gig calls for it. The on stage balance is fantastic and the live sound and balance between hybrid and live kit works well. I get the feel and sound of the real kit while the front house gets the clarity of the hybrid sounds.
 

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rikguy33

Junior Member
Mike mackin : Do you both trigger and mic your bass drum? In the pic, I wasn't sure if that is a mic cable going into the port or if your have an internal trigger. Thanks!
 
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