Do you use those low noise cymbals and sound dampening for quiet practice?

beeter

Senior Member
I tried some at a guitar center. Some of these cost more than a real cymbal. Any suggestions what to get?
 

Chunkaway

Silver Member
I tried some at a guitar center. Some of these cost more than a real cymbal. Any suggestions what to get?
I have the Zildjian L80 cymbals. They are not super cheap, but they do the job. I wouldn't use them outside the practice room.
 

beatdat

Senior Member
Yes, they (L80 low-volume cymbals and mesh heads) are the next best thing to real drums and cymbals. Maybe not so much the silent stroke bass drum head, but the rest are great.
 

IBitePrettyHard

Senior Member
I've played a kit with Remo Silentstrokes and Zildjian L80s. The cymbals feel good, pretty close to the real thing. The mesh heads...not so much. They're squishy and lack definition and tactile feedback.

Another complaint I have is that mesh heads are quieter than low-volume cymbals, making for an annoying balance problem. Although you can increase the volume and attack slightly on mesh heads by putting tape or Falam pads on them.
 

Odd-Arne Oseberg

Platinum Member
Yes. I have some L80s.

I really just use the ride and hats along with a snare and BD pad.

After trying out lots I ended up with a Xymox Resere Snare pad and upgraded my ReelFeel BD pad stand by attaching an Aquarian Super-Pad BD pad to it.

It's not a real kit, but it sure opens up a lot more possibilties when at home and needing to be quiet, especially in regards to ride and hi-hat technique.
 

Chunkaway

Silver Member
I should add, I use the Aquarian Super Pads on my drums. They work much better, in my opinion, than the Remo mesh heads.
 

beeter

Senior Member
Pads on snare and toms and bass drum feel and sound like I'm beating on rubber tires. Sounds like it too.

L80 cymbals sound and feel great though. Cymbomute might be the cheaper option though.

I've played a kit with Remo Silentstrokes and Zildjian L80s. The cymbals feel good, pretty close to the real thing. The mesh heads...not so much. They're squishy and lack definition and tactile feedback.

Another complaint I have is that mesh heads are quieter than low-volume cymbals, making for an annoying balance problem. Although you can increase the volume and attack slightly on mesh heads by putting tape or Falam pads on them.
 

beeter

Senior Member
Is this a sound dampening pad or not:

https://rover.ebay.com/rover/0/0/0?mpre=https://www.ebay.com/ulk/itm/401737961459

Yes. I have some L80s.

I really just use the ride and hats along with a snare and BD pad.

After trying out lots I ended up with a Xymox Resere Snare pad and upgraded my ReelFeel BD pad stand by attaching an Aquarian Super-Pad BD pad to it.

It's not a real kit, but it sure opens up a lot more possibilties when at home and needing to be quiet, especially in regards to ride and hi-hat technique.
 

alparrott

Platinum Member
Back in the days I used to use the Abel/Pintech plastic cymbals for silent practice. Not as sonically pleasant but rather quiet and not nearly as expensive. A five piece set is under $50 at Sweetwater.

However, if you have the money go for the low volume cymbals. They make a bit of sound and will be more rewarding to play.
 

beeter

Senior Member
Did Pintech also released a drum or for drum version for practice? Not sure why they'd only release a for cymbals for practice. Kinda weird considering they have a full practice cymbal set that probably all sound the same lol.

Back in the days I used to use the Abel/Pintech plastic cymbals for silent practice. Not as sonically pleasant but rather quiet and not nearly as expensive. A five piece set is under $50 at Sweetwater.

However, if you have the money go for the low volume cymbals. They make a bit of sound and will be more rewarding to play.
 

alparrott

Platinum Member
Did Pintech also released a drum or for drum version for practice? Not sure why they'd only release a for cymbals for practice. Kinda weird considering they have a full practice cymbal set that probably all sound the same lol.
No, Pintech mostly makes electronic drum pads and accessories for them. The plastic cymbals that they sell are the same ones that they put triggers on to make into electronic cymbals. So these are meant to be used with practice pad kits or mesh heads on a real kit. It makes total sense, because they're repurposing an existing part of a product rather than making a new product such as a practice pad.

They have basically no sound. They sound like a frisbee hit by a drumstick. But for someone in a severely sound-limited environment such as an apartment or bedroom in a house, they feel very similar to real cymbals, and that allows you to train your muscles and reflexes.

What you are missing with ANY silent or practice cymbal or drumpad/mesh head is the ability to develop the same sort of touch that you would on your actual instrument. The best way to practice, quite simply, is on your actual kit. But not everyone has that option.
 

Chunkaway

Silver Member
No, Pintech mostly makes electronic drum pads and accessories for them. The plastic cymbals that they sell are the same ones that they put triggers on to make into electronic cymbals. So these are meant to be used with practice pad kits or mesh heads on a real kit. It makes total sense, because they're repurposing an existing part of a product rather than making a new product such as a practice pad.

They have basically no sound. They sound like a frisbee hit by a drumstick. But for someone in a severely sound-limited environment such as an apartment or bedroom in a house, they feel very similar to real cymbals, and that allows you to train your muscles and reflexes.

What you are missing with ANY silent or practice cymbal or drumpad/mesh head is the ability to develop the same sort of touch that you would on your actual instrument. The best way to practice, quite simply, is on your actual kit. But not everyone has that option
.

100% agree with this comment. If I have ANY chance to play my acoustic drums, I will do so. The only reason I have the quiet heads and L80 cymbals is because I live in a high rise in a huge metropolitan city, so going all out on my acoustic kit isn't an option.
 

michaelg

Member
Yes. I have some L80s.

I really just use the ride and hats along with a snare and BD pad.

After trying out lots I ended up with a Xymox Resere Snare pad and upgraded my ReelFeel BD pad stand by attaching an Aquarian Super-Pad BD pad to it.

It's not a real kit, but it sure opens up a lot more possibilties when at home and needing to be quiet, especially in regards to ride and hi-hat technique.
Would love to see your bass drum pad setup and how you attached the superpad.
 

jimb

Member
I can only practise in a partially detached room. I use Gen16 cymbals cause they really sound like quiet real cymbals and L80 hi-hats cause the constant tapping can annoy peeps. I use pads on the drums and the BD pedal planted against the skin....works well and is preferable to not practising at all.
 

Odd-Arne Oseberg

Platinum Member
A couple of pictures of my "quiet" set up.
That's pretty much my home thing, I just put thingds on stands instead of on the drums and a while ago I decided to let the toms go and prefered the Xymox in the snare position when alone. I have pads for my dull kit though. &-piece 14, 10,12,14,16,22 + 12 aux. The 22 is a big thing to use just as a pad though, so I got an additional 18" bass pad just for that.
 
Top